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June 02, 1912 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1912-06-02

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

1

IchI an

D4rw-t l

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SUNDAY, JUNE 2, 1912.

ma

ctted that the
ik in severa
d jump in
ailed to qual-
n which Sar-
nile in which
is true form.
d that 'Bond
ce in the fin-

t, however, should be pleas-
showing her track athletes
nst the colleges of the east.
maries of the finals.
dash-'Thomas, Princeton,
bs, Columbia, second; Rob-
racuse, third; Olson, Dart-
rth. Time :10 1-5.
dash-Reidpath, Syracuse,
:er, Penn, second; Olson,
, third; Degozzia, Harvard,

WOMEN'S LEAGUE
TAKES OVER W.A.A
Woinen's Athletic Association Can't
Get Money From Blanket Tax
So Will Disband,
WILL CONTINUE ALL ACTiVITIES.
Joining the ranks with the Student's
Lecture Association, with the passing
of the present school year the Worn-
en's Athletic Association will no long-
er be listed among the number of cam-
pus organizations. Penury on the part
of the University Athletic Association
in not giving over to the women a part
of the blanket tax is assigned as the
reason for the official downfall of the
women's organization, and for a time
it looked as though all feminine ath-
!etic activities would have to be abol-
ished, but the Women's League came
to the rescue, and will take over the
duties of the defunct body at the be-
ginning of the next school year.
According to the plans of the league,
the affairs at present conducted by
the Women's Athletic Association will
be placed entirely in the hands of a
:oimittee of the league, presumably
with Miss Catherine Bigelow, director
of Barbour gymnasium at its head.
The Annual Field Day will not be
abolished, nor will the present system
of contests among the women be done
away with, but these activities will be
continued under the direction of the
committee, all the expenses being
borne by the league. Numerals, as us-
al will be awarded.
As yet it is not known whether or
not this extra expense added to the
league will have the result of increas-
ing the membership fees, but the mat-
ter is expected to be settled at an ear-
ly meeting of the board which con-
trols actions of the league.
VEREIN LOSES ON DETROIT
PiRESENTATION OF PLAY.

path, Syracuse,
'cond; Cozzens,
aey, Harvard,
(Breaks Inter-

on page 2.)
A KE S

OF

HN MEDIC

FRESH TRACKMEN.
WIN EASY MEET
First Year Athletes Defeat Ann Arbor
Ixigh in Contest by Score
of 90-27.
COLE AND GREEN STAR FOR 191,
90 to 27 with the Michigan freshmen
on the heavy side of the score, tells
nearly all there is to be told concern-
ing the clash between the athletes
from Ann Arbor high and the All-
Fresh, at Ferry field yesterday after-
noon. With the weather ideal for
track contests and a fair sized body of
spectators present, the youngsters put
up a fairly' good exhibition although
it was slow and inclined to drag at
some stages, so much so in fact that
the biggest part of the crowd gladly
deserted the track for the baseball di-
amond when the band began to play.
The Ann Arborites succeeded in
capturing but one blue ribbon during
the afternoon and that was made pos-
sible through the agility of Wickliffe
who jumped the bar at five feet five
and one half inches, which was more
than his opponents were able to ac-
complish. Smith contributed his share
to the points of the vanquished by
placing in three events and securing
three seconds. Cole and Green were
the two particular stars of the 1915
men, the former taking first honors in
the shot put, hammer throw, and dis-
cus, while the latter placed in four
events and got two firsts. The point
gainers for both teams were present-
ed ribbons by the Athletic Association
at the close of the meet.
Summary:
120 high hurdles-Green (F) first;
Bruce (F) second; Hildner (F) third.
Tinie 16 2-5 seconds.
.100 yard dash-Robers (F) first;
Smith (A.A.H.) second; Felton (F)
third. Time 10 2-5 seconds.
1 mile run-Gray (F) first; Kirby
(F) second; Abbot (F) third. Time
4 minutes 47 3-5 seconds.
440 yard dash-Tuttle (F) first;
Bushjohn (F) second; Rudeman, (F)
third. Time 55 1-5 seconds.
220 yard dash-Roberts (F) first;
Smith (AA.H.) second; Felton (F)
third. Time 22 3-5 seconds.
Half mile run-McKinney (F) first;
McKinsey (F) second; Field (F) third.
Time 2 minutes 8 2-5 seconds.
Shot put-Cole (F) first; Edwards
(A.A.H.) second; Sweet (A.A.H. third.
Distance 48 feet, (12 pound shot.)
22 low hurdles-Green (F) first;
Smith (A.A.H.) second; Wickliffe
(A.A.H.) third. Time 27 2-5 seconds.
High jump-Wickliffe (A.A.H.) first;
Perkins (F) and Green (F) tied for
second. Height 5 feet 5 1-2 inches.
Discus throw-Cole (F) first; Ed-
wards (A.A.H.) second; Bevens (F)
third. Distance 120 feet.
Hammer throw-Cole (F) first;
Hodge (A.A.H.) second; Bevens (F)
third. Distance 128 feet.
Pole vault-Kendricks (F) first;
Begole (F) second; Fisher (A.A.H.).
third. Height 9 feet 3 inches.
Broad jump-Ferris (F) first; Green
(F) second; Wickliffe (A.A.H.) third.
Distance 21 feet 5 1-2 inches.
Total points, Freshmen 90; Ann Ar-
bor high, 27.
Prof. Scott to Lecture at Columbia
Prof. F. N. Scott is in New York
City where he is to deliver a series of
lectures this week before the school of
journalism of Columbia University.
He will return the latter part of the
week.

PLAY FAST IN

strumnents-.
INDI1ANS SAY
B USINESS 1M1EN

for son
up a gr
that wo
the outi
have br
their sl

Varsit itenis Tournament to Begin LIt
, conld Iound Tomorrow.
The first rcbund of the V1arsity tennis
tournament was completed yesterday
and 1)lay will start on the second
round tomorrow, weather permitting.
Probably the best match of the first
round was that between Hilker and
Royon, which went three sets, Royon
winning by steady playing. The match
between Pinnell and Montgomery was
also hard fought and fast. The sched- - ,
ule 'for the second round of the play
is posted on the Varsity courts and all
players are urged to play their match--UTL.
es as soon as possible, as the time is
growing short. Six Va
The results of the first round are:
Miller defeated Morse 6-1, 6-1;
Holmboc defeated Oliver, 6-0, 6-1;
Royon defeated Hilker, 7-5, 2-6, They
6--4; Finnell defeated Montgomery
6-4, 4-5, 6-2; Hall defeated Taggart ways 0
6-0, 6-2; Shafroth defeated Rankin result
6-i, 6-I; Hunter defeated Lo 6-2, yeste'd
4-6, 6-4. Blanchard, Slaymaker, Wil- content
son, Bartlett, Reindel and Dunn won much I
their matches by default. it was'
freshm
Hold Last Senior Li Sing Tomorrow. Varsity
What will probably prove to be the bes, ar
last senior lit sing of the year will be slugger
held Monday evening at 7 o'clock at striplin
T'appan Oak. All senior lits are urged to noth
to be present, especially those mem- It wa
bers of the class who play stringed in- best th

s
DISCRIMINATE a
c
DD I N DI' SCLA Id T HAT A BARBER H
SITOL IN A N ARBOR AND RES- e
TAURtAN.TS IN IIETROIT RtEFUSE o
THIRil PNJ~'B.NAGd

FIRST ,ROUND. I

u ,

OF ALBION '

lurenalistn" Falls to lteee
Support of Orga niza .
tions.

s Buried
and She

ARE TAKEN FOR
Indians Are JPhanning
More Men Here
Fall.

Ecx to

ter a short illness followilng an
ation for appendicitis, biss Mabel
on, twenty-three years of age, a
uate of Albion, died yesterday
ling at eight o'clock at the home
r. and Mrs. Walter A. Morris, 434
hard street. Miss Orrison xlas the
ee of Chas. G. Morris, '14 M, at
liome of - whose parents she. was
ng at the time of being taken ill. .
ming here from Albion last Sat-
y, iMiss Orrison was attacked with
app enldicitis on londay. Her
ition was so critical that attend-
physicians thought it inadvisable
emove her to her home, and onl
day she underwent an operatiol
Miss Orriso rallied well from
>rdeal, and on- Wednesday every
was held out for her recovery,
condition became worse: on the
wing day, however, and she rapid-
clined until the time of her death.
was only two weeks ago that Miss
on's father was buried, and her
here was at the suggestion of
ds who believed that the change
t serve to cheer her up. Mrs. Or-
, mother of the deceased, is over-
by the double blow.
e body of the unfortunate young
an was taken to Albion yesterdayj
noon, where interment will prob-j
take place tomorrow.j

For the second time this year, a
university production failed to make
money in Detroit, when the Deutscher
Verein played "Die Journalisten" to a
small audience Friday evening. While
no estimate has been made of the ex-
penses as yet, it is understood that the
sale in Detroit failed to pay them. This
is a blow to the Verein, which made
mncney on the Ann Arbor performances
and expected to add a little to the
treasury.
The failure of the Germans of De-
troit to turn out, came as a complete
surprise to the local thespians. When
the trip was first planned, it was un-
derstood that several societies would
-take blocks of seats but they failed to
take them. The Verein has enough
money in the treasury to make up the
deficit, even if it runs larger than is
now anticipated. However, an attempt
may be made to have the Detroiters
donate some funds, by way of keeping
their promises.
As far as the play was concerned, it
was a success. The audience though
small, was most appreciative and the
cast played even better than at the
initial perforimance. During the day
the players were entertained by the
Verein and after the play, the Harmo-
nie Club gave them a reception.
Senio:' Lit to Teach in Los Angeles,
Ethel Duebell, '12, has received an
appointment to teach German in The
Girl's School at Los Angeles, Cal.

Unfriendly discriminations against inc
the Hindu students in attendance at obc
the university by a certain local bar- the
ber shop, and a number of Detroit eat- 1
ing places have aroused the ire of the Va
East Indians. They protest that the ch,
attitude shown them by many attend- pla
ants in public places is disrespectful, a g
even insulting at times, and the wait- in
ers in certain prominent Detroit res- Th
taurants persist in mistaking the Hin- ma
dus for negroes. Especially severe is cat
the denunciation of the Indian stu- Ja
dents aigainst certain firms in Detroit th(
who refuse them employment, seem- hit
ingly prejudiced against their dark tal
complexion. The consensus of opin- pr<
ion among the Hindus is that Detroit ter
is more prejudiced against them than '
is Ann Arbor, and they declare that tw
conditions in the City of the Straits fou
seems to have grown more inimical to- an
wards them with the last year than ov- the
er before. Sis
"Discrimination against us seems to w-
prevail to a greater extent in Detroit clE
than it does in Ann Arbor," said B. K. pr(
Bose. "We have more instances of '
prejudice shown us in Detroit than we Fe
care to stand. Only one case can be wh
recalled when one of our people was ser
refused attention in a local barber tea
shop, and that was a few weeks ago. sh
(Continued on page 4.)

ke'

hen
ries.
am v
iould

MU

>sitions

for

Teachers

and

Physician

Teacher--New Mexico,

Instructor in carpentry in Hilo, Hawaii

Physician--I

Teacher--Inhambane, Africa

Manual Training Teacher--Sitka, Alaska

For further particilars inquire at the University Y.M.C.A., the employment secretary.

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