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May 24, 1912 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1912-05-24

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Michigan

Daily

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, FRIDAY, MAY 24, 1912

THREE MANAGERS

an-Democrat
n room B of
liately after
ring. Several
ers will ad-

NAMED BY BOARD
Jos. Fouchard to Guide the Business
Destinies of Michigan Daily
Next Year.

EXAM SCHEDULES
ARE ANNOUNCED
"Blue Book" Program for Lits and En-
gineers Practically Same
As Last Semester.

(GRANDRAPIDS MEN MEET TO
DISCUSS NEXT YEAR'S tA

l__~

.g men will take part:
t, temporary chairman;
iairman of the national
e; Arthur Otto, perma-
; John H. Payne, Re-
er; and Charles E. Mis-
c speaker.

Students from Grand Rapids held a
dinner at the Union last evening, un-
der the auspices of the Grand Rapids
club. Plans and suggestions for the
work of the club next year were dis-
cussed.
It is the intention of the society to
join with , the Grand Rapids alumni
and hold a picnic sometime during the
summer, in order to interest prospect-
ive college students in the University
of Michigan.

SCHOEFFEL AND CLARK CHOSEN. SECOND WEEK LIST IS LARGE.

At a meeting of the Board in Con-
trol of Student Publications, held yes-

LITS

FUNDS

UNION

)R UNION LIFE MEM-
IS GREAT SUCCESS.
IMEN WILL AP.
L SENIORS.

terday afternoon in West hall, three
men were elected to manage the bus-
iness 'affairs of three 1912-13 student
publications. Joseph :v. Fouchard, '12,
'14 L, of Munising, was chosen bus-
iness manager of The Michigan Daily;
Carl G. Schoeffel, '13, '15 L, of Free-
port, Ill., was elected to take charge
of the finances of the 1913 Michigan-
ensian; and William E. Clark, '12, '14
L, of Munising, was selected as busi-
ness manager of next fall's Students'
Directory.
Fouchard will take full charge of
the accounts of The Michigan Daily
next fall, succeeding "Rom." Dilley,
the present manager. The former has
worked on the business staff of the
paper for two years, and during the
current year acted as assistant to the
business manager.
Schoeffel will commence his duties
immediately toward making prepara-
tions for the publication of the 1913
Michiganensian. He has served on
the year-book staff for two years. Dur-
ing the illness of Frank E.Shaw,Jr.,the
present manager,Schoeffel took charge
of the business affairs of this year's
Michiganensian. Clark succeeds Glen
Alcorn who was business manager of
the 1911 Students' Directory.

Schedules of examinations for the
literary and engineering departments
for this semester were announced yes-
terday. The program differs only
slightly from that of last semester.
The schedule of examinations is as
follows:
Courses with first recitation of the
week on

Af

SORF-THROAT

kY FEES

NEXT FALLI

I,

wuin U11l l ! I AW
CLAIMS MANY..

Monday or Wednesday.
At 8--First Wednesday morning.
At 9-Second Wednesday afternoon.
At 10-First Monday morning.
At 1-First Thursday afternoon.
At 2-First Thursday morning.
At 3-Second Tuesday morning.
First recitation on
Monday.
At 11-Second Tuesday afternoon.
First recitation on
Wednesday.
At 11-First Tuesday morn-ing.
First recitation on
Tuesday or Thursday.
At 8-First Monday afternoon.
At 9-Second Monday morning.
At 10-First Tuesday afternoon.
At 11-First Friday morning.
At 1-Second Thursday afternoon.
At 2-First Wednesday afternoon.
At 3-First Saturday morning.
First recitation on
Friday.
Any hour-Second Wednesday morn-

Look With
the

VICTIMS HERE
HOSPITALS AND DOCTORS BUSY
CIRING FOR THOSE AFFECTED
WITH PECULIAR DISEASE OF
T lE TIIR()AT,

MALADY IS NOT DANGEROUS
Disease, Said to Be Angina, Prevalent
Recently in Several Large
Eastern Cities.

stander.
The ti
lishment
and the
associati
the butt

to the number of thirty-
Lready pledged their life
e Michigan Union, in the
A has been instituted to
erships. The twenty com-
ho are conducting the
Iging by the partial re-
rere received yesterday,
g memberships from
ery three men approach-
lie majority of the class
canvassed, but every sen-
proached within the next

I

I )

mnlent

and December of this year. The cam-
paign will be continued until' May 31
among all the departments. The fol-
lowing is a list of the senior literary
students who had taken out the life
memberships up to last night:
Max Howell, Warren Crane, Harry
Folz, Paul Schick, Joseph Fouchard,
T Clarence Dean, John L. Cox, Earl
d Wightman, Leslie Bell, Morris Houser,
D Arnold Houser, Lorenzo Wood, Robert
t Shaw, Rowland Fixel, Sylvan Grosner,
George Beis, David Vesey, Emmett
- Taylor, Arthur Moehlman, Herbert
t Watkins, Mark Finley, Edward Kemp,
t Louis Stern, Walter Pritz, Kenneth
Osborn, William Restrick, Frank Pen-
nell, Reginald Collins, Clair Hughes,
t Mack Ryan, Lawrence ,Abrams, Will-
iam McCormick, Maurice Toulme. Er-
win Bosworth, '13, and Leonard Reis-
er, '14, have also taken out member-
ships.
TEN JUNIOR LAWS INITIATED
INTO FOLD OF BARRISTERS
Senior Law Society Holds Initiation
Banquet at Mack's
Tea-Room.

GAME WILL DECIDE CHAMPS
OF INTER-CLASS DIAMOND.
Fresh Engineers and '13 Laws Will
Probably Struggle for Final
Honors Tomorrow.
The final game in the inter-class se-
ries will be played tomorrow after-
noon on the Varsity diamond, and the
result' will determine the champion-
ship of the campus for this season. It
is now an assured fact that the fresh
engineers will be one of the partici-
pants, and according to the showings
of the other runners-up, the J-laws
will probably be the team to cross
bats with them.
The class of ball displayed by the
fresh engineers this spring has been
of an exceptional order for a class
team, and the fact that the junior
laws were able to overcome last year's
champs, the senior lits, speaks for
their strength. The game is expected
to be the closest and most exciting of
the inter-class season and the fact that
Sisler, the freshman phenom, and Lan-
igan, whom the laws have been saving
especially for this game, are slated to
do the twirling for their respective
teams, makes the contest of interest to
all.
A charge of twenty-five cents will
be made in order to help defray the
expense of the sweaters that will be
given to the new champs.
Editor of Joy Book Visits Ann Arbor.
Donald Kahn, former Michigan man,
and now editor of the Joy Book, of
South Bend, Indiana, was an Ann Ar-
bor visitor yesterday, leaving last
night for Detroit on business.
Alumnus Gets Responsible Position.,
According to a report from Illinois,
,received by the Alumni association,
Robert McMurdy, '80 L, has been elect-
ed vice-president of the Illinois State
Bar Association.

ing.
First recitation on
Saturday.
Any hour-Second Thursday after-
noon.
First recitation on
Any Day
At 4-6-Second Thursday morning. .

I

Drawing 4, 4a, 5a.
First Wednesday afternoon.
Irregular Courses.
First Friday afternoon.
First Saturday afternoon.
Second Monday afternoon.

The sore-throat epidemic is still given
pushing its way through Ann Arbor. ation
Despite the efforts of the medical au- noni
to ha
thorities to check the spread of this an al
peculiar malady, many have come in The
contact with the disease. The Uni- ciatio
versity hospital and local- physicians issuir
received many patients for treatment sertir
yesterday and many were so severe in izatio
character that confinement was rec- claim
ommended. that I
The sore-throat has been diagnosed rectic
as angina, and is the same disease that betto:
visited New York, Baltimore, Chicago, years
and other large cities a few weeks ago. The
As has been previously reported, the ent t:
sore-throat is so contagious that it af- to ha
fects all who come in contact with the A
those already afflicted with it. For this organi
reason, the authorities advise that ev- to th
eryone should use precaution and keep scrib
away from those already affected. memi
The disease, however, is not serious, The
and will not develop into diphtheria or discu:
any other malady commonly inciden- at its
tal to sore-throat. Cultures of the next
germs have been prepared in the bac- letic1
teriological laboratory, and, the hos- favor
pital authorities are in a position to grant
give proper treatment. hand,

ose
0 to

.A

,Despite the protestations of the
counselors that there were none in
the 1913 law class fit to become Bar-
risters, ten juniors were admitted to
the senior legal organization yester-
day afternoon. This decision was
reached only after those seeking., ad
mission had been marched about the
campus, and told of the evils of the
dents, engineers, medics and lits,whose
dens were pointed out, to them.
Those who were admitted after hear-
ing the warnings, and promising to
respect nothing but the law, follow:
Burke Shartel, Dion Birney, Stanfield
Wells, John Gutknecht, Hector Young,
Peter Balkema, James Cleary, George
Burgess, Robert Mayall, GeorgQ Thom-

MICIIIGAMUA WIGWAMS OPEN
FOR NINE MORE PALEFACES.
Senior Society of Lit and Engineer-
ing Departments Holds
Second Initiation.
With the setting of the sun last ev-
ening, the Tribe of Michigamua set out
upon the war-path for its second
spring rampage and captured nine
palefaces from the literary and en-
gineering departments. The men who
smoked the peace pipe for the first
time were: John Coolidge, W. C. Trib-
le, Carroll Haff, Godfrey Strelinger,
James E. Hancock, Walter Hopkins,
Frank Gibbs, Selden Dickinson and
Edward Saler.
IIOMEOPS GARNER EASY VICTORY
Fresh Medics are Defeated 9-0; Id-
son Stars for. Homeops.
Pounding the horsehide all over the
lot yesterday afternoon, the homeops
carried away a 9-0 game from the
'15 medics, without giving the young-
sters half a chance to become danger-
ous at any time. Idson was stingy
with the number of safeties that he
yielded and proved powerful in the
pinches, striking out nine men.
Batteries: Homeops-Idson and
Smith; '15 medics, Koebbe and Goeh-
ring; umpire-Baker.
"FREDDIE" GOULD FORCED TO,
UNDERGO SERIOUS OPERATION
"Freddie" Gould, '13, who has been
confined with a severe attack of pneu-
monia, was forced to undergo a seri-
ous operation Wednesday night. The
attending physicians reported his con-
dition as much improved last evening.

DEDICATE SMOKER TO PROF. HILL
Foresters Bid Farewell to Member of
Forestry Faculty.
"I am more grateful than I can ex-
press, to you men here tonight who'
have opened your hearts to me and
stretched your imagination a bit en-
deavoring to assure me that I have
had some small part in the success of
Michigan's forestry school," saidiProf.
C. L. Hill, of the forestry department,
at the Forestry club smoker at the
Union last evening, in response to the
presentation of a pair of field glasses
to him by the students in his classes.
The smoker, the fifth and last of the
year given by the Forestry club, was
held in honor of'Prof. Hill, who leav-
es Michigan in June to go into private
worlY.
SIGMA XI WILL HEAR COMSTOCK.
Wisconsin Professor to Speak Before
Scientists This Evening
Prof. George C. Comstock, of the
University of Wisconsin, will deliver
the annual Sigma Xi lecture in Sarah
Caswell Angell hall tonight at eight.
The subject of his address is "The Vis-
ible Universe as a Subject of Current
Speculation." It is open to the pub-
lic.
After the talk, the members will in-
itiate the fifty-one men recently elect-
ed to membership, and hold their an-
nual banquet in Barbour gymnasium.

Wives (

culty Men I
ics Courses
composed 'o
'- - l

A :

members of the faculty
Lansing yesterday, afte
ed the home economics
M. A. C. The trip, whit
cial, was made at the
tion of President Snyd
sing institution.
All the members of
pressed themselves as
with the department a
opinion that. similar co
gan would be successi
was presented to the Bo
some time ago for the
such a department at
matter was referred I
under Regent Beal, wh
sidering the project.
Death of Mother Calls I
Harry C. Rood, Jr., a
has been called to his h
gon; on account of tih
mother. He is undecid
er he will return to sch

ening
Boar
ment.
Th
sition
have
uate
by th

week. One m+
board has exp
ing the entire
to the Union
the Alumni as.
to carry the
d of Regents f
e Union has ta
z, at the same
the right to iss
button that ho
e Athletic asso(

Plans for the new building of the
Pulitzer School of Journalism, at Co-
lumbia University, are now completed
and in the hands of the officials for
approval. The structure, of limestone
and granite, will be six stories high.
"Stover atL Yale" has had the larg-
est circulation of any recent book
dealing with college life.

n banqueted at Mack's
ean H. M. Bates, Prof.
and Barristers Veder,
delivered the toasts.

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