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May 19, 1912 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1912-05-19

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tor

Michigan

Daily[

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SUNDAY, MAY 19, 1912.

T OFjFiCERS
iTING OF YEAR.

ACTIVITIES- TO BE HURRIED.I
'U

TRAVELLING SQUAD
DOWNS OHIO STATE

iversity Ma-
meetingfor
light. After
r.H.J. Lough-
ravels in the
the follow-
r: president
sident, H. M.
sident, G. A.
, C. P. Bush-
hat the annu-
will be held
at the Mich-

I Tennis

Players Victorious in
Last Match of Spring
Trip.

the

E. GKEMP IS NEXT
UNION PRESIDENT
Wins in Elections Yesterday by Small
Margin Over Ryan; Polls
Poorly Attended.
MEDIC VICE-PRESIDENCY A TIE.
Edward G. Kemp, '12, won the
Michigan Union presidency for the

PLAY IS

SPEEDY; SCORE

,4-2.1

(Special to The Michigan Daily)
COLUMBUS, O., May 18.-Playing'

Auditorium May be Ready for Corner.
Stone in June.
Alumni who return to the Seventy-
fifth Anniversary Celebration may
have the opportunity of witnessing the
ceremonies attendant to the laying of
the auditorium's corner-stone if ar-
rangements can be made in the near
future. According to construc-
tion Manager J. E. Anderson
progressing rapidly andunless some
piece is left out to be used as an offi-
cial cornerstone it would be impossi-
ble to lay one at ground level by Com-
mencement time.
VARSITY Is
TROUNCED, DY
MI A. C.AGAIN

In

hard and fast tennis during every min-' year 1912-'13 by a margin of 26 votes

Vc

SED

H'll ANNUAL FESTIVAL
. 0. SIGN OUTT FOR TWO
I'S; ALL A TTRACT BuI.
'E S.
VIS ARE ARTISTIC
id Delilah," Final Program
Melody and Brilliant
Orchestration.
May Festival has become
Two concerts yesterday
the nineteenth series. In
ttendance, every audience
record-breaker. Friday and
ights the S. R. O. sign had
into play.
ly, the present festival
rninently among the finest
ver been given here. The
'e been of a high standard,
ra and chorus surpassed all
s; the programs have had
y and symmetry to which
ns can be taken. These
of the building materials
Messrs. Stanley and Stock
tified and composite music-
during the past week. The
and enjoyment from these
ust be doled out in homeo-
s by each one who attend-
le to last during the com-

ute of play, Michigan won over Ohio
State this afternoon. All the playersI
were in fine fettle and good weather
made ,the matches a success. Thel
final score was Michigan 4; Ohio1
State 2. '
The summary of the matches is as1
follows:
Singles-Thorward (M) lost to
Zuck (O.S.) 5-7, 7-5, 4-6. Andrews
(M) won from Haddox (O.S.) 6-4,
7-5. Hall (M) won from Moor (OS.)
7s-5, 9-7, 6-8. Holmboe (M) won
from Scarlett (O.S.) 6-2, 6-0. ,
Doubles-Hall and Holmboe (M)
lost to Zuck and Moore (O.S.)d6-3,
0--6, 4-6. Thorward and Anderson
(M) won from Haddox and Runyan
(O.S.) 4-7, 7-9, 6-3.
Varsity Ahead on Ohio Trip.
This ends the matches of the annual
tennis trip which was shorter this
year than it has been in the past. AllĀ±
the opponents were Ohio college
teams. The varsity squad came out
on top in all but one of the matches
played. Only the Kenyon team was
able even to hold the maize and blue
to a tie. Michigan took a clean sweep
from Oberlin, on the trip as she did
when Oberlin played here. Otterbein
was defeated by a 6-0 score, while
the game with Wooster was prevented
by rain.'
COMMERCE COMMISSION BOARD
MEETS IN OFFICE OF DEAN.
Mortimer E. Cooley is Chairman o
Block Signal and Train
Control Committee.
The Block Signal and Train Control
Board of the Interstate Commerce
Commission, of which Dean Mortimer
E. Cooley is chairman, held its
sessions in the office of the Dean for
three days starting Thursday.
The committee is composed of the
following members: Captain Azel
Ames, formerly chief engineer of the
electric zone of the N. Y. C. R. R.;
B. S. Adams, associate editor of the
Railway Age Gazette; F. G. Eswald,
consulting engineer of the Illinois
Railroad and Warehouse Commission;
W. P. Borland, secretary of the board;
and S. N. Mills, stenographer,of Wash-
ington, D. C.
Besides this last session, there
will be one more meeting of the board
in Washington next month, at which
time its work will be completed. The
board was organized in July 1907 and
during five years of its existence it has
examined 11,000 devices designed to
promote safety in railroad, operation.
Of this number about 30 have been
found to posess merit warranting in-
stallations for practical tests.
CELLO, VIOLIN AND PIANO
TRIO TO PERFORM AT UNION
Stringed music by a trio of campus
performers heads the bill that is to
be presented at the Michigan Union
this afternoon. Henry Ballard, '13,
will play on the violin, Edward Ham,
'15, on the piano, Frank Wheeler, '15,
on the cello. Besides this an informal
program of songs will be given. Re-
freshments will be served to the
guests.

over his only opponent Mack Ryan at
the annual elections held yesterday.
Kemp received 119 ballots supporting
his candidacy, while 90 Union mem-
bers voted for Ryan. The vote rep-
resents a small portion of the mem-
bership of the Union. It is believed
that the slight balloting was due not
to disinterestedness on the part of the
members but more to the fact that
there were a number of intervening
events that occurred during the time'
set for the election.
Edward Saier was chosen recording-
secretary; Howard Wilson, lit vice-
president; Jacob Crane, engineering
vice-president; Stanfield Wells, law
vice-president and Norman Starr vice-
president of the combined depart-
ments. Henry Adams, Henry Bates
and Reuben Peterson were elected
faculty members.
The vote for the two candidates for
the' vice-presidency of the medical
department resulted in a tie. The
nominees were C. S. Kennedy and R.
W. Selby. A special election will be
held within the next five days to
decide the contest. The definite place
and hours will be announced in The
Michigan Daily when they have been
decided upon.
GUY WIRE UPSETS VAN WITH
FESTIVA.L ARTISTS' TRUNKS,
Rope From West Gin Pole of New
Auditorium Causes Accident
On Thayer Street.
A large moving van belonging to the
Godfrey Moving and Storage company
while making a forced run to Univer-
sity hall to collect the trunks and par-
aphernalia of the May Festival artists
and orchestra ran into one of the guy
wires attached to the west gin pole
on the Hill auditorium site on 'South
Thayer street and was toppled over
last night. ,
The driver by rare -presence of mind
controlled the team of horses, and es-
caped without injury, but the trunks
which he had gathered from the ho-
tels were hurled in every direction by
the overturn.
The construction company has taken
many precautions to prevent accidents
to vehicles. Besides displaying red
signal lanterns at dangerous points,
and erecting a barbed wire fence,
employs a watchman to patrol the
property, but with these precautions
the danger of possible accidents can-
not be avoided, and steps may be taken
to close South Thayer street to ve-
hicles.

GAME, ERRATIC ON B01
ENDS WITH MAIZE A
PLAYERS AT SMALL
-i SCORE.
CORBIN REPLACES B

t

M. A. C. Pite
Stellar
But

eties.

.an "Samson and Delilah" Brilliant.
.ad "Samson and Delilah"' an opera in
her three acts by Saint Saens brought the
ted Festival to a brilliant close. The work
is dramatic in the extreme; melody is
asy rampant and orchestral color utilized
for to the full. The role of Delilah was
il- ably interpreted by Miss Florence
as Mulford . The famous aria "My Heart
his at Thy Sweet' Voice" was given with
his intensity of suppressed emotion that
his made the beautiful phrases' wonder-
et. fully telling.
the Ellison Van'Hoose made a fine Sam-
of son. In his solos and in the long
scene in the second act with Delilah,
he showed a fine sense of the dramatic
the situation; at the same time he display-
of ed his magnificent vocal attainments.
in- In the early part of the evening a
nts slight huskiness was noticeable, but
.ir- the high B flat, sung fortissimo just"
the as the walls of the temple crash down
an, upon Samson, dispelled any doubt as
ra- to the quality and power of Mr. Van
tim Hoose's voice.
cks Coming almost unheralded and with
:16 no trumpets to announce him, Marion
rly Green, baritone; achieved a tremen-
ing dous success by his singing of the
fn- role of the High Priest. His voice is
its, one of the most beautiful baritones
ng that it has been Ann Arbor's fortune
and to hear recently. He puts spirit and
fire into everything he sings.
er, The aged Hebrew and Abimelech were
he sung by Herbert Witherspoon with
f 6 the accustomed dignity and breadth
the of style. The chorus scored again;
the and in the march, "Lo, the Spirit of
hes the Lord," the volume of tone was tre-
nip, mendous;
rm, The organ recital in the afternoon
of by Mr. L..L. Renwick was listened to
n~ot by a large audience. A variety of ef-
ar- fects in registration was illustrated
eet as well as the magnificence of the full'
organ tone. The march from Gounod's
"Queen of Sheba" elicited applause.

The interclass contests ended sat-
isfactorily, the track meet was a suc-
cess, but at the ball game, which was
planned to be a grand windup, there
was a hitch in the program, a mo-
ment's hesitation and then a disas-
trous slip. It might have been the
unusual gathering of fans, it might
have been too many victories, it might
have been a hoodoo, but 'above all it
was a mighty poor game of ball. The
Michigan team seemed up in the air
and heaved the ball around with ruth-
less disregard, while Baribeau was be-
ing joyously greeted with a bevy of
hits. And so the afternoon ended
with Michigan being defeated by M. A.
C. for the second time this season, and
on this occasion by the decisive count
of 5 to 1.
The one bright spot in the fiasco was
the pitching of Dodge a southpaw who
was about the whole game for the
Farmers and who really deserved a
shutout. He only allowed three safe-
ties, two of them going to Bell, and
he was as cool "as a cucumber." The
slugging abilities and proclivities of
the Wolverines were woefully lacking
an'd they did not deserve to win under
any circumstances. Six misplays and
boots apiece were contributed by the
warring aggregations but Michigan's
were the most costly and handed sev-
eral runs to the mechanics of the plow
and fertilizer from up .state. In fact
the acidulated plays of both teams
were so frequent as to mar the whole
game and turn an other wise perfect
day into a somber tragedy.
Baribean has Few Good Innings.
Baribeau essayed to start deceiving
for Michigan and did well for three
innings almost. Then his kindly offer-
ings were greedily grabbed by the vis-
itors and before he retired they had
annexed six hits and a quartette of
runs. He didn't have much more
than a smile and some confidence and
in the sixth Corbin was promoted to
the 'wrecking crew and rushed to the
scene of the disaster. He was in good
form and except for an error would
have kept the Farmers from scoring
again. "Bill" Donovan was on the
judge's bench and as per usual arbi-
trated in good style and has the addi-
tional merit of keeping the game on
the jump so that victuals could be
served at the proper hour.
Michigan made its lonely and un-
earned tally in the second inning. Mun-
son was safe when Rogge missed his
grounder. He was sacrificed by La-
vans and made another station when
Bibbins passed one. On Bradley's er-
ror he ambled home and ended for
that session the scoring on the part
of Michigan.
Third Inning Disastrous.
The third inning was the grand fin-
(Continued on page 4.)

was frec
jump, th
an ever-i:
lings, un
man was
over half
runner.
Ra
The ra
of the na

* * ** * * * * * *
*
* T1WO-BIT ADLET NEWS.
* -V.

*

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*5
*

"A certain party" had a canoe
he didn't need. He bought a
Two-Bit Adlet in The Michigan
Daily. Within three hours af-
ter the Daily was delivered the
owner of the Two-Bit Adlet had
five people trying to buy his ca-
noe.

*
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vauiting at tne
clean cut, and
from a walk-awE
The second ra
men by an eighl
the runners on
culty in climbin,
time between o
fast as in the fir
In the third rE
in doubt until tb
reversed several
group of soph
the last laps ma
1914 banner car
lap ahead.
Sophs T
Directly follo,
big pushball wa
and the underc
their respective
fending the wes
year men had tl
contest, and th
outnumbered by
siasts.
Both sides at
vigor when the
and the leather
high in the air b
fore time had tg
down. Hostiliti
once and contin
tinuously for tl
minutes, at the
ball had' progrn

TRY A TWO-BIT ADLET.

*

*
.1' .3'
* * * * * * * *

1resbtertan Churcb
10:30 A.M. The Seat of Moral Character
7:30 P.M. The Claim of Conscience.
As Illustrated In Victor Hugo's, "Cane"
LEONARD A. BARRETT Minister

The sect
py, and the
merous jo
(Co

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