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May 18, 1912 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1912-05-18

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Michigan

Daily

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SATURDAY, MAY 18, 1912.

.

x * FRESH VANDALISM
'ODAY. *m

I

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AROUSES COMMENT
Upperclassman Scores Yearling's for
Campus Desecrating Thurs-
day -Night.

SYRACUSE ARRIVES
FOR TODAY'S MEET
Each Man on Either Team Will Be,
Numbered for the Benefit
of Spectators,

STRAW-HAT

DAY.

WOULD EXPELL ALL CULPRITS. MEET TO START'AT 1s30 O'CLOCK.

*

rge U.
r. Law

Ro0-
vice-

*
*

ringer, Nor-
.*
ary-Harold *
e r. . M*
--Henry C. *
Bates, Dr. *

L;:"

CESS

To

idle prediction made by
ard her at the Evanston
year that Mme. Almas
I "take Ann Arbor by
e won her audience the
ppeared on the stage-and
he battle. Her smile was
her manner gracious and

(The Michigan Daily assumes no re-
sponsibility for sentiments express
ed in communications.)
Editor, The Michigan Daily:-
There are times when a word 'from
an upperclassman to those who are to
follow is not amiss.
The action of the members of the
present freshman class in painting
their dirty green, little insignificant,
trivial, childish-I won't write it,-
on the class monument in front of the
law building was the most infantile
thing that has ever been done on this
campus. It showed a disrespect of
all that goes to make up a university.
It ws Worse than the crudest kind of
vandalism. VYgdlism merely destroys,
this kind of highfvolislessism, or let
us say grammargradeism, not only 4e-
stroys the beauty of that historio nwn-
ument, but it is an insult to the class
that put the monument there. -That
monument, like all other class tokens
'should be preserved, if we are to re-
tain the name of university, with tras
ditions and customs befitting an in-
stitution of higher learning. If we, as
an institution, are to become a school
for flaunters of the red flag, breeders
of riot, demolishers of all that is good
and stable in society, and a place for
the erudification, if such were possi-
ble of infantile minds, then such things
might be tolerated.
The only feasible remedy is for the
men, and we may be thankful that we
have some real men in the first year
class, to remove the stains of those
"Hoodlums," in the speediest man-
ner possible. Then if the whole organ-
ized freshman class can find the men
who did it, if they are afraid to tell
the faculty, let them tell any senior
or junior, or sophomore on the cam-
pus, and they may, rest assured that
those dirty little puppies will get all
they so richly deserve.
Perhaps this may seem a little se-
vere on some of our ignorant fools,
and to call them even that is rank
flattery; but if it seems severe, just
consider that they are common thiev-
es, for they have stolen, in the mis-
taken belief that it would reflect glory
on themselves and people of their ilk,
what is the property of another or-
ganization, the class of 62.
To call a spade a spade, they are com-
'mon thieves, nothing more and noth-
ing less, and as such they should be
dealt with accordingly, and as an up-
perclassman, I want to go on record
as favoring the immediate expulsion
from the university of those men who
were engaged in this nefarious enter-
prise, and as a man I would like to
help horsewhip (which is putting it
mildly) every one of the dirty little
whelps who was engaged in that, job.
PHILIP A. COLE, '12 L.
Wait ! Dig Di
Today's the D
ichiga

Eighteen Syracuse athletes, with
their trainer and manager, arrived in
Ann Arbor last evening, all in readi-
ness for the struggle with the Michi-
gan track men this afternoon at Ferry
field. The members of the party left
Syracuse 'Thursday noon, travelling'
by rail to Buffalo, and from thence to
Detroit by boat. The team spent yes-
terday in Detroit and came out to Ann
Arbor on the evening train,
Besides Trainer "Tom" Keane and
Manager Cochrane of the Syracuse
team, the Orangemen party consists of
Captain Reidpath, Fogg, Robertson,
Kinney, Taylor, Newing, Rile, Algire,
Danes, Sargent, Coakley, Kortwright,
Champlin, Thompson, Stiles, Street,
Barden and Pratt.
The final apportionment of these
eighteen athletes to the various events
was as follows: Reidpath, Fogg and
Robertson will take care gf the 100
yards, 220 yards and 440 yards dashes;
Kinney, Taylor and Newing, the half
mile; Algire, Rile, Danes and Sargent,
the mile and two mile runs; Coakley,
Kortwright, Champlin and Thompson,
the hurdles; Kortwright in the pole
vault and high jump; Stiles in the high
junp; Champlin in the discus throw,
shot put and broad jump; Street in the
weight events, and Bardlen and Pratt
in the broad jump.
The men Michigan will enter in the
events are those who made the best
showings in the Varsity meet last Sat-
.urday, with the exception, of course,
of those who are ineligible to compete
as Varsity athletes.
A feature of the meet will be the
numbering system which will be em-
ployed to designate the athletes. Eaph
man competing his been given a num-
ber and will wear the figures pn his
back. The numbers correspond to
numbers opposite the names of the en-
trants on the programs, and spectators
will thus be able to distinguish the
athletes.
Michigan's track squad took a ligh~t
workout yesterday afternoon, and on
the eve of the struggle all of the men
appeared to be in fair condition for
(Continued on page 4.)
RULES FOR RELAY RACES.

Michigan's second Annual
Strqw Hat Day has been
ally set for today. So get out
the last year's "grass lid," or if
it has passed the stage of re-
spectable old age, try the hab-
erdasher and invest in a new
one. Straw Hat Day is an inno-
vation at Michigan, but it is
thought that its success last
year warrants the continuation
of the custom, as much for the
fact that it means the establish-
ment of a new tradition in the
university as anything else.
Derbies or caps will not be in
the race today, but panamas and
the lighter straws will reign su-
preme, for the one day at least,
and the wearers will be subject
to no disagreeable remarks from
the hands of unfeeling "studes,"
due to the fact that an annual
straw hat day is held in all the
larger universities in the coun-
try. So, be patriotic and eigpt
the new lid.
* * * 4 4 4 *

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'ge

MANY RULE
Both Classes D
day's. Conte

*

MICHIGAN WINS
LAKE MOHONK
PEACE CONTEST

bank proved t
two teamst pull
fresh light-we
heavy-weights-
It. was 319
son's gu gave
weight teams to
For uly twen
tied- ou the ro

REAV
BY

.

PER}CIVAL Y. BLANCHARD TA]
FIRST 1 ATIONA AYE1
BECOMF E~ .ACE,'ORATOR
THElE TNjl SATE
EIGHTY LLE'GFS ENTER
Una~nious ecision TenderedDi

Ioft
ani

ga-

With the
ly, the ger
precipitatel
tendei' gern
a dank dea
With four t

man bank
Fpr the 'fi t ne in the history of In order
oratpry at theUniversity of Michigan, ruled that
a Wplye1 should be
a Wolverine, ercival V. Blanchard, sub
- ~remaininff

The two arias she chose for her part
the evening's program were ones
ich need just such a personality as
rs to give them the final charm. Vo-
lly she is likewise endowed-the
ality of her voice is pleasing, and
th her technical training she is able
sing difficult passages with a free-
m that proclaims her an artist who
s a brilliant future in either concert
opera. She accorded two encores
hich were as much enjoyed as her
ias. The melodious love scene from
)meo and Juliet was so beautifully
ne by Mme, Gluck and Mr. Reed Mil-
r that they were called back to re-
at the last part.
The Marche-Fantasie, for organ and
chestra, which brought forward Mr.
L. Rehwick as soloist formed a
ique close for so fine a program. It
seldom that the combination is
ard. As an organist, Mr. Renwick
s no rival in this section of the
untry, and the spirited, yet dignified
ading he gave the March displayed
s mastery of the "King of Instru-
ents."
The mid-winter tour of the Chicago
nd of players .to the Atlantic coast
-ought forth the comment from east-
(Continued on page 3.)

1. Three races of sixteen men each
to be run..
2. No man to participate in more
than one race.-
3. Both man and banner to go
through barrels and over fences, but
not necessarily at same time .
4. Each race to cover tWo miles,
each man running 220 yards.
5. Banner to be carried unfurled,
preferably on shoulder.

'14, carried awa honors at the Nation- fe
al Peace Co0te, held at Lake Mo- sI
honk, N. Y Thlbsday evening. Blan- gt
chard won a Pri7 of $100 in gold be- m
side th eonor being declared the
National Peace9Cator of the United
States.
Opt of tpe eightipolleges whichi en- e:
teregl mer e iptheontest, all were th
eliminated but the ichigan and West- a:
ern Reserve ePreontatives in the rc
preliminaries, s o at but two men y
contested for t eMors at the con- 4
test Friday evening Blapchard, re- a
ceived firsts from ; the judges, al- in
though the contest N an exceeding-
ly close one. Afterhe contest, he fr
received invitations 4eliver, his r
oration before the C eof the City w
of New York, in Music all at Phila- c4
delphia, and at Bltim i
The members of the torical fac- o
ulty were extremely plea, when the d
result of the contest wahnnounced. t
Prof.. D. Iollister saidThe result
is most pleasing, a clean, eep with
five firt: W
INJURED ENC NFEJSTE Ce
!AS 4 ~ A LIFE. b
th
The condition of Harr J. ill, '14 m
E, who was injured Wednesk, by a h
timber falling on him while chi
the building of the newcrium, p
yemains about the same. S9I hope ro
is entetained Lor hisrceover, he
continues ratoinal.

uraau ulK t

he advantage was reve
Lnd it was. only a matt
ope by the handful fo
ear men.. The heavy
3 minutes., the freshn
gallant Aght even aft
nto the chilly Huron.
Following the contes
ree-for-all was 'ndulg
iver banks. Many an
was torn from the sic
ompanion to be summ
nto the river, and seve
us conflicts were only 1
etermined interference
he officials.
Regulations are Dj
Rules governing th4,
vere commonly dis ega
ontrary to the requa r
eam had numrous li
raced the fee;of the c
here were ,eral case
nen pull}'g on both
Leavy-Weighlt teams..
ame urtnanageabhe
gushed up to withim a
ope,
pOne freshmae Tnalph
(Contitiulad on i

Thf

w n

Pony UpI

ay to get yo u

nensian .

: ,-

TODAY

VS Mk 'wu

vs

MICHIGAN

M o

A.

C.

K

MEET

sharp

Admission 75c

Won e Ba1J Q r
FERRY FIELD 2:45 P.M. AV
Tickets admitting to base ball game only will not

0

11. A. C.--Michigan Base Ball (ame

Wa

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