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May 10, 1912 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1912-05-10

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MichiganD
ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, FRIDAY, JUNE 10, 1912.
III II

SING.

Support

WILL STIMULATE
WEARING OF CAPS
Student Council is Back of Movement
to Remedy Laxness of First
Year Men.

-robed
>f Me-

the
e a
Sre

.ng their COMMITTEES ARE APPOINTED.
er. The
>m every Committees of the prominent men
he senti in the various freshman classes will
attached be appointed this week by the class
presidents to stimulate the wearing of
chorus, freshman caps on the campus. Ac-'
nd man- cording to the plans of the Student
esponded Council committee, Edward Saier, '13,
oices in Arthur Schlichting, '12 P, and Rob-
erything ert MWayall, '13 L, appointed at the
to "The last council meeting for this purpose,
the rep- another determined effort is to be
Victors" made to remedy the first year men's
nost ap- laxness in this respect. Activities
sembled. will be extended during all next week.
on June The matter will be approached from
a new angle this time, and the situa-
- tion is to be met from within.
The lit, law, and engineering com-
T E mittees will be composed of about fif-
teen men each, and those in the other
departments will be somewhat small-
er.. Every member of each committee
is expected to exert his best efforts
ii Select to get all his classmen to wear their
common insignia.
Saier is delegated to look after the
literary and engineering departments,
.Mayall, the law department, and
T 2:15. Schlichting, the medic and combined
departments.

held

FORESTERS TRAVEL
TO SAGINAW FARM
Practical Demonstrations to be iven
Students in Ways of Wood-
man's Life.
I)r. ANELL WILL BE SPEAKER.
Breakfast tomorow morning at the
Saginaw Forestry farm will be the
first event on the program of the For-
esters' Field Day. For the prepara-
tion of this meal and for instruction in
camp cooking, two hours will be allot-
ted, 7 to 9 a. m. Demonstrations in
horse-packing and in wrangling will
be given from 9 to 10:30. Between
10:30 and 12 will occur the sports,
canoe and swimming races and canoe
tilting contests. The barbecue will
begin promptly at noon.
The afternoon program will begin
with speeches by Dr. Angell and
Prof. Roth, following which Dr. E. K.
Herdman will give a demonstration
of "First Aid to the Injured." The
half hour between 2:30 and 3 o'clocl(
will be devoted to demonstrations of
canoe packing and portaging. These
will be followed- by instructions for
breaking camp and manpacking. The
formal ,program of the day will end
with the finals in the rifle and pistol
matches, which are booked for 4 p. m.
The remalder of,the day and Sunday
will be given over to further instruc-
tions and practices pertaining to the
woodsmen's life.
Many foresters will leave for the
camp this afternoon. Faculty mem-
bers and students who are unable to
get away today will make the trip to-
morrow morning. The pack train,
which is to constitute the advance
guard of the foresters, will leave the
economics building this afternoon at
2 o'clock.
PENNSYLVANIA PROFESSOR
ADDRESSES PHI BETA KAPPA
Professor Schelling Advises Honor
Students at Fifth Annual
Banquet

t, 031I[7

Announcement was n
of several important
pointments for the 1911
ion opera. Robert Bra
and Cyril Quinn, thre
were apointed assistan
eral chairman and Godf
'13 E, who served on t
has been chosen manag
Five new members ha
ted to "The Mimes," tl
Dr. Henri Hus, who has
orchestra for a numbei
been added to the list o
hers and Rowland Fix
Taylor, Russell Morrill
an are the new student
three assistants by virt
pointments become assc
of the organization.
TEAM IS PRI
FOR VARSIT'
A bsence of Entrance Li
ise Warm vome
All Events

Assistants to
-Mhster of

icil Sub-Chairme
17th for Day of
Contest.
PROMPTLY A
,o of f.- Cnr. A

WILL START

o1 the Stuient Counci
n charge of the spring
Lt the Union yesterday
finitely decided to hold
contest at 2:15 on the
riday, May 17. It is'
e earliness of the hour
e time for spectators to
ield for the baseball
of holing the tug-of.
May 25, the day pre-
for Sophomore Day,
but inasmuchras the
n would be greatly in-
by this move, it was
o retain the original
ng to begin the tug-of-
t 2:15," said Bert Wat-
iof arrangements for
st evening. "A prelim-
be fired at 2:05, and
ter actual pulling must
ther all the contestants

EASTERN ALUMNI EXPRESS
OPPOSITION TO CONFERENCE
Secretary Smith Delivers Pilncipal
Address at Alumni Banquet
in Philadelphia.
"The eastern alumni favor MAichigan's
present athletic relations," said Secre-
tary Shirley W. Smith yesterday, "and
they are opposed to a return to the
conference. It's a good thing for them
to have a team from Michigan down
east a few times a year."
Mr. Smith returned yesterday from
a week's trip to Philadelphia and
Washington, and gave the principal
address at a banquet of Philadelphia
alumni, Saturday evening. His sub-
ject, "News from Home," included
particulars about the Union, the ath-
letic situation, and the Seventy-fifth
Anniversary.
Dr. Carl C. Huber, of the university
faculty, who is now doing research
work at the Wistar Institute, gave an
impromptu address at the banquet.
Other speeches were made by Elmer
Crawford, '84, 0. W. Perrin, '01, Charl-
es Doolittle, '74, and Professor M. B.
Snyder, '87, of the Philadelphia High
School.
Private business prolonged Mr.
Smith's stay in the east.
NEW TANGLE OF DATES IS
PRESENTED TO SOPHOMORES
Inter-Society Festivities at Whitmore'
Force. Sophs to Make Dif-
ferent Plans.

With practically ever
worth to the track squa
every man, including S
shape to compete, the
track meet on Saturda:
an interesting event. A
be no entry lists, it is
the meet will draw out
able material in college
,rans and novices cor

all

CHITECTS DINE AT UNION.
lety Gives Farewell Banquet to
Prof. Pe'rey Ash.
ver sixty future architects attend-
the fourth annual banquet of the
hitectural society which was held
evening at the Michigan Union.
borate preparations were made
the affair which took the form of
.rewell banquet to Prof. Percy Ash,
concludes his work at Michigan
semester.
F. Anderson, '13 E, presided as
atmaster and talks were given by
f. Emil Lorch, Prof. R. M.*Wenley,
'. Hudnut,''12 E, H. F. Weeks, '14
W. G. Sprague, '15 E, and Chester'
.ght, '13 E. Following these toasts
f. Ash delivered a farewell address
ressing his regret at leaving his
friends to take up his work in new

ie ball
ambled CERCLE FRANCAIS PLAYS AT
picked DETROIT TOMORROW NIGHT
came
extra The Cercle Francais will repeat "Le
Monde ou l'on 'ennuye" which was
given at the Whitney theater on March
28, in the Detroit Central High School
INOON tomorrow night. The various Detroit
organizations, including the Detroit
inter- Alliance Francais and student French
yed off classes of the High School,have shown
ze sen- great interest in the production and
ts, the promise a large audience. A recep-
senior tion will be given to the cast and
Wilson, members of the Cercle Francais by
.e indi- the reception committee of the Alli-
ance.

And the sophs are hoodooed again.
The cogs of the sophomoric social ac-
tivity have slipped another notch. The
last blow, hardest of all, comes after
the three-cornered tangle of council,
Athletic Association, and .the sophs
themselves, had been solved.
All preparations for a record Soph-
omore Day on May 25 were on foot,
advertising out, plans laid, tangles
solved, expectations whetted. Then
comes the information that inter-soci-
ety festivities, planned for the same
date, but some weeks ahead of the
sophs, again quashed the hopes of the
second year men. Not only that, but
the dining hall at Whitmore Lake will
have the S. R. 0. sign out at both
noon and night, for the inter-society
men will be followed by a Toastmaster
meeting.
So woe is once more in the tents of
the sophs, who will meet again in
comniittee form at the union at 5 to-
morrow afternoon to \wrestle anew
with sophomoric trials and tribula-
tions.

"Humanities have varied with ourl
ideas of manhood," declared Prof.?
Felix Schelling, of the University of
Pennsylvania, last night at the fifth
annual banquet of Phi Beta Kappa in
Barbour gymnasium in honor of the1
new members from the class of 1912.
"I regard the study of ancient Greek
culture as necessary to the study of
literature as antique sculpture is to
the study of art. The study must be
pursued with a disinterestedness
which will allow free play to its lib-
eral elements. The measure of the,
educational values of the humanities
lies in their practical utility.
"Our ideals 'in education change and
must be adapted to present needs. We
are in a struggle for the very princi-
ple of liberality of education itself.
Practical utility is by far the most in-
sidious enemy of modern, education,"
said Prof. Schelling. "I mean by util-
ity that chief reckoning upon com-
mercial values, a reduction of things
human and divine to monetary stand-
ards. Utility demands that we hurry
our boys to the professional schools
before they are ready for college, that
we turn as many studies as possible
into their practical application. Utili-
ty in education destroys the idea for
which a university is created, and
transfers it into a submissive follower
in the wake of a constantly degener-
ating public opinion.
"The greatest need of our education
today is a restoration of the humani-
ties in our college courses to a larger
portion than has been theirs for many
years. The ancient languages will
long remain the most fruitful of the
humanities because of their splendid
isolation from the possibility of ap-
praisement by modern utilitarian
standards."
Prof. A. G. Canfield, president of the
local chapter, presided at the banquet.
Prof. Arthur L. Cross also spoke and
gave an- account of the aims of Phi
Beta Kappa.

The injury to Sargent's knee, which of the law
at first appeared likely to keep him out Earl Moo
of the Varsity meet, has healed enough the ceremo
to allow -him to enter, and Dr. Kraenz- as usual, P
lein states that the high jumper will the invoca
probably compete in his special event. James B. A
Waring, the broad jumper, has been a "College
l.ttle under the weather, but will in all they are no
likelihood, perform in Saturday's he said."'
struggle. idea firmly
Cohn, a former star prep school mand the
jumper, has been showing considera- come in c
ble class in practice, and may spring a do this yo
surprise in this event. Track follow- mand resp
ers would not be surprised to see "To com
Cohn give Waring some strong oppo- fellow me:
sition, especially as Waring has not upon you
been jumping up to form on account without cc
of his slight illness, to your o
A feature of the meet will be the the motive
appearance of Paul Maxon, of Trinity" and above
College, in the pole vault. Maxon is grow. Do
the athlete who is training for the rut, but cc
Olympic games, and who pole vaulted leave the
12 feet 3 inches in practice with the pu'ity of
Michigan squad on Saturday. Maxon not you wi
will enter the pole vault in order to profession
give the candidates for the Michigan to attain
team some real competition. force of y
Training table for' the Varsity track able to pu
athletes wil be started next week ac- good in ti
cording to the present plans of Dr. live.
Kraenzlein and Director Bartelme. "I say,
the purpo
Dental Society to Banquet May 17. good and
'The Senior Dental Society will hold your fello'
its annual banquet at the Michigan
Union on Friday evening, May 17. An MAKE P1
elaborate program is being arranged
which will include speeches from Prof. Bur
members of the faculty and class. Pr
Steps a
Final Fischer Party is Held Tonight. mittee in c
This evening, at Granger's acade- ticipation
my, the last' of the Fischer parties versary ce
for this season, will take place. Fisch- students a
er's six-piece orchestra, including the are being
J-hop vocalist will furnish the music. guests.
The dancing will continue until 2 a. m. chairman
Saturday. . called a n
at the Un
Senior Medics Pass Resolutions. at 5 o'clo
Resolutions were recently passed Bursley,
by the senior medic class to thank Dr. Restrick,
Win. F., Breakey, whose resignation will talk
from the faculty has been anounced, tives in r
for his long term of faithful service to the stud&
the university. celebratio

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