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April 30, 1912 - Image 1

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1912-04-30

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e

MichigaDaily

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, TUESDAY, APRIL 30, 1912.

P

LAST DANCE WILL BE "'WINNER."
Union Plans Novelties for Saturday
Evening Function.
The third, and last, of the series of
Michigan Union dances will be given
in Barbour gymnasium Saturday even-
ing, May 4. Pr'arations in harmony
with the occasioh are being made by
the committee in charge. The orches-
tra has been doubled for this dance,
WITH and it will include eight pieces. "Ike"
TED NY Fischer, in person, will preside at the
piano.
THAT Only forty tickets will be sold for
this dance as 160 season admissions
have already been disposed of and
, DAY the gymnasium will accommodate but
200 couples The pasteboards will be
d Held put on sale at the Union today for sev-
9 ty-five cents a couple.
thletesCOUNCIL HOLDS ITS
ay, a FIRST OPEN SESSlbN
~unda
iagara Representatives of Student Body Open.
d con- the Doors in Response to
Michi- 1Popular Demand.
in the
down- CONSIDERS SPRING ACTIVITIES
in was
of the For the first time in its history, the
Student Council meets tonight in open
n well session. According to the number in
was attendance, either the oratory room or
even- the philosophy lecture room In the
might- north wing of University hall, will
heavy be used, permission from the author-
e first ities. fln ..,Es een obtained.
The business to come before tnat
us, is Council tonight will be largely in re-
epends gard to the spring contests and cap
de. He night. Several important committee
lowing reports are also scheduled. The meet-
k, and ing will be called sharply at 7 o'clock.
t have
home FORESTERS GETTING READY
n who FOR ANNUAL FIELD DAY

FUTURE. SENIORS
TO WEAR BUTTONS
Athletic Association Transfers Insig-
nia to the.., ichigan
COMMITTEE T01WORK OUT STYLES
Michigan graduates of the future are
to have a permanent uniform insignia
as a result of the action of the Athlet-
ic Board yesterday. The button, which
has in the past been given out by the
Athletic Association, was formally
transferred to the Michigan Union with
the reservation that a Michigan button
be adopted by the Union and sold or
given to every Michigan graduate to
c .
According to the preliminary plans
that ha been formulated by t'v U-
i, lase s ,of buttons will be adopt-
ed to be en to its members during'
their resifi~ce at the university. Thy
permanent button will be only for thp
graduates and will probably be.given
toe- senio-rs who have beei members
of the ifnion for four. .years and will
probably be sold to stu'dents who have
not been union members for a nominal
sum..
T 'gan which will be followed out
in adopting the button is qpi that .has
been in use at a number of the eastern
universities, notably Princeton, with
much success. The bu-4.on will be the
same style year ;after year and will
be worn as the one distinctive mark
of a Michigan graduate.
"We will be able to give the yearly
button to members without adding any-
thing to our membership fee," said
Manager Heatl of the Union. "But
undoubtedly we will be compelled to
charge the students who do not become
members of the Union a small fee for
the graduate button.
"The Union button will be a great
aid to us in enlarging our r ember-
ship among the students. It adds
another tangible asset that we can of-
fer for membership."
The matter will be put in the hands'
of a committee to suggest styles for+
the buttons. It is not likely that the+
new order will take effect until next
year as the Athletic Association has
already issued buttons to its members.1

RACKET WIELDERS

1

MAKE COMPLAINTSI

canldidates for
)annuuier

Varsity Protest, Against
of Cutting Down

the Squad.
FLIESMEN ORGANIZE

'ONIG tT.l

Now comes the University of Mich-
igam, tennis squad and complains of
the manner and method of choosing
the nimble artists of the net and raq-
uet who will represent the l aize and
Blue o .the courts this sprNi.. Not
t! t lo e criticism is aimed at any indi-
vidua who is entirely responsible for
h, wrong. but rather .is the system at-
acked. So far the complaint has not
ached a definite stage but is confined
to rumors and mumbling, but it may
eventually result in something.
In choosing the squad it has not
been the custom to hold an elimination
tournament or to allow a long time in
which to pick the most likely looking
men but the man'er of dropping the
candidates has een rather sudden.
Acordhg to those who seek a change
the squad consisted -of about thirty
m n a wee*.or so ago atd no'w but
a half dben remain to chase the
bouncing pellet. It is argued that a
longer time should be allowed before
the final choice is made, and that
sofine sort of a system should be had
whereby a better line could be obtain-
ed on the me'rits of the men. Capt.
Thorward could not be located to give
the other side of the controversy but
no serious rebellion is expected.
With an. idea of getting a line on
available material, a freshmen tennis
squad will be organized tonight at
Waterman gym when Capt. Thorward-
anti Dr. Lee will talk to all freshmen
candidates and endeavor to work up
enthusiasm among the yearlings.
LOC VITDIlC DANCE TI) BE
FEATURED BY '12 ENGINEERS-
Intricate novelties and surprises are
being planned by the committee in
charge of the last dance of the 1912
engineers, to make it one that will last
long in the memory of those who at-
tend. The dance will be formal. A
logarithmic dance called the slide..rule,
designed by one of the senior boiler-
makers, will be presented for the first
time. The grand march will be led
by the officers of the class.
The affair will be held this Friday
at Granger's academy. Dean and Mrs.
M. E. Cooley, Prof. and Mrs. G. W. Pat-
terson, Prof. and Mrs. S. J. Zowski,,
Prof. and Mrs. A. H. White, Dr. and
Mrs. A. B. Pierce, Prof. and Mrs. H. E.
Riggs and Prof. Sadler will act as7
chaperones.l
RALPh CRAIG TO COMPETE IN
OLYMPIC TRYOUTS AlT HARVARD
All doubts as to whether Ralph]
Craig, the former Michigan track star,#
and holder of two world's records, willE
enter in the Olympic games this year,
have been removed. He nas sent in his
entry blank for the tryouts to be held#
in the Harvard stadium on June 8 as
he prefers that track. He will run in
the 220 and the 100 yard dashes..
SiO WERS PREVENT CONTEsTS; l
CLASSES WILL PLAY TODAY.

HUiIORISTU ENDS S. L. A. COURSE.
Irving Bacheller Will Speak on "Keep-
ing Up With Lizzie."
Irving Bacheller will lecture on sub-
jects treated in his satire "Keeping Up
With Lizzie" tonight at 8:15 in Univer-
sity hall under the.auspices of the S.
L. A. This is the last number on the
association's course for this year. Mr.
hacheller is considered to be one of
the foremost humorists of America.
1lis depictions of New England charac-
teristics especially folk lore, are said
to abound in wit. He is also acquaint-
ed with the people of the woods and
their humor, having lived with them
for some time.
Mr. Bacheller will be entertained by
the Alpha Tau Omega fraternity while
in Ann Arbor.
WRECK DUE TO
'MISTAKEN ORDERS
So Declares Coroner's Jury in Finding
on Fatal Collision Near
here April 15.
C111DNAL PROCEEDING UNLIKELY

BECK,

FOR

JUNIOR LAW GETS
DECISION OVER
WITH BOOK NOTI(
LACK OF LOCAL SEI

I r

Announces Some of
res of This Year's
Celebration.

the

in his Arrangements for the annual Field
condi- Day of the Forestry Club, which is to
iteral- be held at the Saginaw forestry farm
[e his west of the city on Saturday, May 11,
count- are rapidly materializing and the com-
pend- mittee in charge of the affair announc-
ss on es that several new features have beenl
were provided for this year's celebration.

ot

'ee

well
dis-

ack charg-
esterday in
men were
was of the

AKE.I

as

on Saturday,
kets, good on
Arbor direct-
)ld at reduced
cal merchants
various indi-
which will be
,1 i i 9.

Special emphasis is to be placed this
year on the fact that open camp will
be, held at the farm from Friday the
10th until Sunday evening of the 11th.
Sleeping accommodations will be pro-
vided for all those who wish to avail
themselves of this opportunity, and a
commissary department will be operat-
ed in order that the campers may pur-
chase food supplies on the grounds.
Saturday will, of course, be the big
day, at which time demonstrations of
many things pertaining to camp and
trail will be given. A program of
sporting events has also been arrang-
ed, and trophies will be presented to
the winners. The barbecue, which has
become one of the permanent features.
of the day, will be held at noon.
Tickets for the affair will be placed
on sale today.
ART ASSOCIATION PLANS
FORESTRY LECTURE COURSE
A series of illustrated lectures on
"Forests, Parks, and Gardens," to be
given by Professor Filibert Roth and
Prof. Aubrey Tealdi of the university,
has been planned by the Ann Arbor
Art Association. "A Tour Through the
Forests of Europe," the first, will be
presented tonight by Prof. Roth. The
lecturer will discuss reforestation
methods in the French Alps, Switzer-
land, Germany and Denmark, and their,
results, as well as the lack of forests
in Spain.
Mr. Tealdi will speak a week from
today on "Public Parks," and the week
following on "Little Gardens for Small
Home Grounds."
The lectures will be held in High
School auditorium at 8 p. m. Twenty-
five cents admission will be charged
to those not members of the Art Asso-
cia.tion.

MICHIGAN MAN TO DELIVER
ORATION AT LEAGUE CONTEST
Louis Eich, '11, who will represent
Michigan in the Northern Oratorical
League' Contest, to be held in Evans-
ton, Ill., on Friday evening will give
a public recital of his oration, "The
Law's Delay" in University hall to-
morrow afternoon at 4:15.
Thursday afternoon Eich, accompa-
nied by Prof. T. C. Trueblood, will
leave for Evanston, where he will meet
the representatives of the four
colleges in the contest. Eich
won the right to represent Michigan
at this contest by carrying off the first
honors at the local struggle held some
time ago.
DEAN BATES, IN CHICAGO;
fAY VISIT DENVER ALUMNI
Dean Henry M. Bates of the law de-
partment, who attended the meeting of
alumni held in St. Louis on last Sat-
urday night is now in Chicago and
may go from there to Denver to attend
a meeting of alumni of that city, in
which case he will not return here
until the latter part of this week.
Fresh Laws Prepare for Last Dance,
Fresh laws will hold their last dance
of the year on Thursday eve, May 2,
and not on May 3 as was announced.
Tickets may be secured from Hall, Mc-
Coy, Haislip, Perry, I lagaman or Arm-
strong.
Rhetoric Instructor is Granted Leave,
Mr. Ernest P. Kuhl, instructor in the
rhetoric department, has been granted
leave of absence for one year by the
Board of Regents, and will do research
work at Harvard for his Ph.D. degree.
Mr. Kuhl graduated from Harvard in
1908.

"Mistake or misunderstanding of or,
ders between the dispatcher and the
crew of east-bound car number 109"
was the cause assigned by the coro-
ner's jury last evening in* its finding
on the recent wreck on the Detroit,
Jackson and Chicago railway, in which
two persons were killed and several
students injured. The jury recom-
mended that the company be required
to employ additional and competent
help in the dispatcher's office and
properly instruct its employees in op-
erating trains ,nd especially in taking
orders. <'
The inquest removes the likelihood
of criminal proceedings, according to
a statement made last evening by a
prominent attorney. However, suits
for damages may be instituted by par-
ties with whom the company has not
yet settled. It is expected that the
State Railway Commission will re-
quire more strict supervision of train
dispatches and additional devices for
safeguarding electric lines.
SENIOR SWING OUT DATE
TO BE DECIDED TOMORROW
Caps and Gowns Here, With the Ex.
ceptions of Engineers', and
May be had at Once.
At a meeting of all class presidents,
called for tomorrow noon at the Mich-
igan Union, the exact date of the 1912
senior swing-out will be determined.
The annual promenade was held on
May 4 last year but it is certain that
a date somewhat nearer Commence-
mnt will.be chosen this spring.
Caps and gowns for all senior class-
es, with the exception of the engineers,
have arrived and may be secured at
once. The boilermakers' garbs were
ordered from a different firm and are
expected at an early date.
Some misunderstanding in ordering
caused the homeop caps to be sentI
with white tassels, the color formerly-
used in that department. Inasmuch
as university officials recently assign-1
ed the use of the white tassel to those
possessing a high literary degree, thei
homeops will wear green tassels with
white buttons on their headgear in the
future.
SENIOR CIVILS FIX DATE
FOR START OF SU.IER CAMP

ISSUE CALL FOR COMPQ$1
Latter Will Write Opening Ci
General Songs and the
Finale.
Robert G. Beck, '13 L, with a ploi
ticeable for the absence of local
ting and color, has been unanimo
declared the winner over his el
opponents in the 1913 Michigan 'U
opera contest. Beck hails from G
en, Indiana, and was an unsuce
competitor in the lyric contest
"The Awakened Rameses." Other1
this he has had no experience in
matic work.
Beck has already written nu
of the lyrics for the opera and
probably write them all, contrar;
the usual custom. Work will be at
ed at once organizing the prelimi
arrangements for the productIox
the show.
General Chairman, Philip Floti
has issued a call for composers t
tend the meeting at the clubhuse
will be held during the first par
next week. The composers ths
will be limited to writing the oe
chorus, the general songs and
finale.. The definite dlate o t
ing will be announced later.
With the selection of his book -
becomes an ex facto member pf
Mimes, the Michigan Union oper c
The principal composers also bec
members after the same fashion.
Prof. L. A. Strauss, a member of
libretto committee, was enthusiasti
his praise of the book. "The boo
very promising, because it is enti
different in plot from past operasq
it affords excellent opportunity
musical work. A large number of
books that were entered in the con
were meritorious, but it was the ux
imous decision of the committee
Mr. Beck's production excelled.',
The memlbers of the libretto c
mittee were: Professors Scott, SItr
and Stanley, and Francis Rioidan
Arthur Moehlman.
SENIORS DELAY IN PAYIN4G
FOR DETROIT BANQ1U
After auditing the receipts from
senior lit banquet last Friday even
the committee . has found a de
which the number of attendants
not warrant. .Several members of
class did not settle for their ass
ment with the result that the ch
man had to draw upon his pers
funds. These men are asked to
tend to this matter at once.
Proofs of the picture which wa I
en will be exhibited at The Michi
Daily office in a day or two.
NEWSPAPER PUBLISHER TO
SPEAK TO JOURNALISM CL
James Schemerhorn, publisher
the Detroit Times, will speak to P
scott's class in journalism this in
ing at 9 o'clock in room 207, West I
His subject is to be "The Ethics (
Newspaper Man."
Mr. Schemerhorn is one of the t
known editorial writers in the s
and was for many years, previou
the founding of the Times, an edito
writer on other Detroit newspap
He is conversant with the busi
from all standpoints and should p
one of the best speakers ihat
been brought here for the clases
journalism. The public is invite
attend the lecture.

Leave for East.
pith will leave
sday where he
given by the
, on May 4. He
1k.
o Improve.
the law facul-
ek has been at
Walter, who is
>it, reports that
tter is greatly
hough his re-
he is steadily

The ideal showers of yesterday pre-
vented the interclass games that were
scheduled to come off on Ferry field.
If the weather permits, those contests
which were due to be settled yester-
day will be played a week from Friday.
The following games are scheduled
for today: '14 L vs. Dents, '13 E vs. '14
E; and Pharmics vs. Homeops.
Dean Vaughan Returns From St Louis
Dean Victor C. Vaughan returned
yesterday from St. Louis, where he at-
tended the western alumni banquet.
Will Give Browning hecital.
Prof. R. D. Hollister's class in In-
terpretative Reading will give a re-
cital of Browning's works Thursday
evening at 7:30 in room 205, N. W.

The 1913 civil engineers who intend
going to summer camp decided at a
mass meeting last evening on July 1
as the date to start camp. Prof. C. T.
Johnson gave a brief history of previ-
ous summer camps, and illustrated his
talk with lantern slide views.
It was also decided to have the same
management as last summer take
charge of the boarding arrangements.
About 80 men intend going to camp
this year.
Prof. H. E. Riggs, the new head of
the civil department, will be in camp
for two or three weeks..

4

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