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April 23, 1912 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1912-04-23

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Michigan

Da

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, TU]SDAY, APRIL 23, 1912.

NO ACADEMIC DRESS FOR ALUMNI
Graduates Not Expected to A ppear in
G1arb for (elebri ationt,
GDean J. R. Effinger yesterday denied
IF the rumors that have gained some cre-
dence among alumni that they will
E S be expected to appear in academic
dress at the Seventy-fifth Anniversary
Celebration. The faculty, the r pre-
sentatives from the other univer.ities
STAN and colleges, and the seniors are the
[NED only ones who will be expected to wear
AN'S the cap and gown. The misunder-
standing was probably caused by a cap
and gown firm that, has been sending
advertisements to the Michigan alum-
NCE ni all over the country.
In order to set .the graduates right
arfere Dean Effinger has made arrangements
.- for a communication in the Alumnus
and the publications devoted to Michi-
gan's interests in Chicago and New
m of York will explain the whole situation.
e and A printed denial of the rumor will 'also
stitu- be included in the lecture that will be
usion sent to the alumni inviting them to
ently attend the celebration.
' this -___-_ - -----____ -
ss P.
and RCARLGHUBER
have
gan's
)oug- ALSO TO REMAIN
while
vities
Announces His Intention in Letter to
ector President harry B Hutch-
'ticu- in s
I not u-
elop- HAS BEEN ON LEAVE OF ABSENCE
erest.
n the Close upon the heels of the news that
with Prof. Filibert Roth is to stay at Mich-
n, or igan comes the welcome information
,mainthat Dr. Carl G. Huber, professor of
i will
to histology and embryology, whom it
two was feared contemplated resignation
resh- from the medical faculty here, will al-
[owi so remain. In a letter to Pres. Hutch-
ccess ins, received yesterday, Dr. liuber ex-
pressed his determination to sever hisG
connection with the Wistar InstituteI
year of Philadelphia, where he has spent
d not two semesters on leave of absense
used doing research work. The Wistar In-
used stitute has one of the most famous an-
>rthe atomical research laboratories in the
roae country.
was th Dr. Huber stated that hereafter he
I the would spend his time in Ann Arbor
two ithout repetition of protracted leave
has absence at Other institutions. It is
has generally understood that the officials
urnetl
p his of the Wistar Institute attempted to in-
d hduce Dr. Huber to become a member of
bead the Institute staff.
"Dr. Huber was elected a member of
in the American Philosophical Society at
evel- Philadelphia last Saturday," said Dean
The Vaughan, last night. "That shows his
stern standing. He is one of the strongest
not men in the world in his line."
full "his work has been a great credit to
turn- the university," said Pres. Hutchins.
past "It is a great advantage to Michigan
efore that we have been successful in keep-
ing him here."

GRAPHICALLY

PORTRAYS THE.
CHINESE, WAR
.1NK (A WAN, '11 E, CHIEF AS-
SISTANT EN_1NEER OF KUANG
Tj UN ( PROVINCE TELLS OF CHI-
NESE 1tEYOLUTION.
HAS CHARGE OF FIELD WORK
)aDsacres are Due to Discharged Ar-
m, Composed of Pirates,,
Beggar and 'Thieles.
That Jink Gain Wong, '11 E, who is

PLAYS WILL
BE PRESENTED
INDETROIT
SENATE COUNCIL GRANTS PER-
MISSION TO BOTH CERCLE FRAN-
CAIS AND DELTTSCIHER VEBEIN
PRODUCTIONS.
SUPPORT PLEDGED TO BOTHj

NOTED CHIARACTER PASSES AWA
Aged Owner of "Tutt's" Restaura
Succumbs to Old Age.
Passing the allotted three score ai
ten by almost a decaide, W. W. Tutti
the widely known and well loved owi
er of "Tutt's" restaurant, answere
Death's call at 8 o'clock last_ nigh
No merchant institution had a wid
reputation than "Ttitt's Book," ti
charge account open to college men fc
over twenty years.
Mr. Tuttle was born at Blue Poin
Long Island, in 1833. Coming t
Michigan he entered and graduate
from the Ypsilanti Normal, and, aft<
rears of business enterprise in ot
Michigan and his birthplace the fan
ous "Tuttle's Place" was opened t
grads of the late eighties. From th
faculty to the student body, both ol
grads and new entrants became -;
quainted with the unique method o
bookkeeping employed by Mr. Tuttl;
He is survived by one son. Death w2
due entirely to old age; and his wid
circle of friends, old and new, mour
the loss of the old resident.
HOLD SERVICES FF
TITANIC VICTIM%

n<

lis

the First Time That a French Phay
is (iven Outside f
An Arbr.

Permission was granted by the Sen-

now living in Canton, China, has not ate Council yesterday to both the Cer-

forgotten his Alma Mater was evidenc-
ed, when a long letter from Wong was
received by the secretary of the
engineering department yesterday. The
war now being waged around Canton
was graphically described.
"As for this war, there has been a
great amount of excitement lately due
to the fact that the soldiers here have
been fighting among themselves. Last
week several hundred soldiers and cit-
izens were massacred. The whole
trouble lies in the fact that the new re-
cruits, of the Revolutionary army re-
fused to be honorably discharged, and
hand over the "'fire works." At present
there are over 20,000 soldiers who were
pirates, thieves, beggars and robbers
before the war. So you see that such
people would naturally be hard to
manage."
"A fierce battle took place near the
railroad station here, and a smaller
combat also occurred right at my
doers that nearly scared the life out
of my people and neighbors. Fortu-
nately none of us were hurt, thanks to
the servants who had all doors and
windows locked and barricaded in
time."
Wong has already obtained an im-
portant position, being Chief Assistant
Engineer of the Kwong Tung Province
Public Works, and has all field
work in charge. He has made a sur-
vey of one of the longest streets in
Canton, with the view of widening it,
and has also made a survey of the city
walls, which are to be torn down, and
a new street built in their place. The
city walls are 5 miles long, 30 feet
high and 40 feet wide. He has 12 as-
sistant engineers and 20 coolies under
his charge.
Wong is a member of the Chinese
Institute of Engineers which was es-
tablished January 28, 1912.
"PIE JOURNALISTE N" SEAT
SULE BEGINS THIS MORNING
Advance seat sale for "Die Journal-
isten," the Deutscher -Verein comedy,
will begin today at Wahr's State street
book store and will be in progress
there between the hours of 9 and 12
this morning and from 2 to 5 this af-
ternoon. At these times the greep
tickets which were purchased in the
classes may be exchanged for the dol-
lar reserved seats. However, the sale
will not be restricted to the exchang-
ing but all seats will go on sale at
this time. After today, the disposal
of tickets will be carried on at the
Whitney theater.
Rehearsals for the play are being,
held every night and the cast is rapid-
ly improving. The first dress rehear-
sal will be held Wednesday evening.

cle Francais and the Deutscher Verein
to give their 1912 dramatic produc-
tions on Detroit stages. Petitions sub-
mitted by both societies before the
spring vacation came up at the meet-
ing yesterday afternoon, supplemented
by personal letters from prominent
Detroiters, and pledges ofsupport
from influential organizations, so that
the Council was prevailed upon to
grant the two societies the right to
make the trip.
"Le Monde ou l'on s'ennuie" will be
presented by the Gallic contingent in
Detroit Central Hgh School auditorium
on May 11. This is the first French
play that the university has ever sent
outside Ann Arbor, according to the
statement of Prof. A. G. Canfield, head
of the French department. Negotia-
tions had been pending for several
weeks before vacation between Di-
rector Rene Talamon of the play, and
the French faculty of the . Detroit
school, which had terminated in a ten-
tative date, subject to the approval of
the Council. Both the Alliance Fran-,
caise and the University Alumni asso-
ciation, have also been communicated
with, and have pledged their support
to the production.
"Die Journalisten" is planned to oc-
cupy the boards at the Garrick Theater
in Detroit, but the date is not yet fixed.
A definite Friday or Saturday engage-
ment is hoped to be secured. The
play will be given under the auspices
of the Detroit Stadtverband, a combi-
nation of all the German societies of
the city. The joint organization pass-
ed a series of resolutions to persuade,
the faculty to allow the presentation.
Mayor W. B. Thompson and Comp-
troller David ,lleinemann, of Detroit,l
also wrote personal letters to Prof.
L. A. Strauss, of the committee on
Dramatic Activities requesting that
permission be given to produce the
play in their city. .
Six years ago the same play was given
by the Verein in Detroit under the aus-
pices of the "Harmonie" society. The
players were only offered their ex-
penses, but now they will get their ex-
penses and a per cent of what is clear-
ed over and above them.
Refer Petition to Proper Committee.
Consideration was also given at the
Senate Council meeting, to Band Man-
ager Max Stanley's communication re-
questing that the band stand be erect-
ed again. It was referred to the Com-
mittee on Decorations for the Seventy-
fifth Anniversary Celebration, of which
Prof. C. S. Denison is chairman. This
committee is entrusted with all erec-
tions on the campus from now till
June.

Every Church Commemorates
Catastrophle.

Death 1

l)EA~

(OOLEY TALKS ON SUIJECT

At every church in the city Sunday 0o
mention was made o. Lh Titanic dis- '
clii
aster and its terrible effect, and special elef
services were held at St. Andrew's str
church in commemorat on of the catas-
anc
trophe, while at other churches, pray- ita:
ers were said#for those who lost their 1i2
lives i the wreck. At thi Presbytc- ic
rian church, sermons were preached in ;
memory of the dead. ics
Collections to relieve the sufferers tra
were taken at several of the churches ing
and a considerable sum for the relief but
of the afflicted ones was realized. Any- Z
one wishing to contribute to the fund est

ablsih(

may do so by notifying Prof. G. W.
Patterson, who has charge of the mat-
ter.
In speaking of the calamity yester-
day, Dean M. E. Cooley stated, "Civil-
ization is getting what it demands, and
is paying -the price for it, but' what
a price! The Titanic is the outgrowth
of the times, the people literally de-
manded it, and the price we are paying
is exactly the price that one would ex-
pect that we would have to pay'."
He also declared that we as h people
were responsible for the actoin and
that the blame should not be placed on
any individual.
"However," the dean said, "the
catastrophe cannot fail to have
at least one good result. The He-
roism of the men who gave up their
lives so bravely serve to make the
worldbetter and brighter, in that it
places manhood where it belongs."
SENIOR ENGINEERS TO BOLD
FINAL DINNER TONWGHT
Places will be set for one hundred
and ten senior engineers at their final
class dinner at the Union this evening.
Morley S. Sloman will officiate as
toastmaster, and Prof. G. S. Williams
will speak on "Auld Lang Syne." Har-
ry Steinhauser will talk on "Near
Grads," W. S. Heald on "Baseball,"
and "Larry" Leartmonth on "The
Boulevard."

departme
men will
gents me
"DOWNT
argoyle

n+

it reten-
the year
tetroit.
the law
day, vis-
'12, who
seriously

FACULTY PARTIALLY DECIDES
ON ENTRANCE REQUIREMENTS.
Conclusions with regard to the pro-
posed changes in graduation require-
ments were reached at the faculty
meeting last night, sufficient to present
a partial report to the Board of Re-
gents. But much still remains to be
done, and what was passed must un-
dergo the consideration of the Regents,;
so that no statement of the faculty's
findings could be given out last night.
They will probably be presented at the
next meeting of the Regents.

"Downtown," with a
falls, allurements a
from the straight and
revealed in its blacke:
poet and essayist in
of the Gargoyle whic
pearance tomorrow nx
investigations conduc
goyle's own detective
public for the first tinr
ditions which are bou
sociology department
clergy.
A loving farewell to
one of the special feat
ber and contains ni
from various alumni.
tion to the unknowing
self in the hitherto un
history of the "come
recently put out by th
Former Instructor ]
Fern L. Shannon,
structor of Food and
last year in the Scht
and who at present is
Lansing, visited the
terday on professiomn

. W. {

Ld, the
at 8:00

I

. Ja. nes

Z30

A peaks to College Girls
kAflgellTODAY at 5 p.m.

C

At

NEWBERRY

HALL

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