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April 21, 1912 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1912-04-21

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

IDA BERG

I

PROFESSOR OLDENDORF

PIEPENBRINK IS
CHARACTER U
VERA M. BURRIOGE WILL PLAY
FRAU LOTTE PIEPENBRINK.1

itors of the
skins, Jr., as
-tant part in
(Col.) High
aduated, Mr.
ant in public

JOHANNES

'I

PLAY PART

I '

Lotte, the wife of Piepenbrink the

I

MARY H. WOODHULL

FRED B. WAHR

While her conservative father and
radical lover are threshing out the
question of political 'supremacy, poor1
Ida Berg is left in the pathetic posi-
tion of not knowing whether she is
to be with her lover or separated from
him forever. From almost the very
beginning to just at the end, this sus-
pense is kept up, and Mary H. Wood-
hull has to call upon all her histrionic
powers to portray successfully the an-
guish in her heart.
Miss Woodhull, who comes from
North Bermington, Vt,, took the lead-
ing character role in the Junior girl's
play last year, which she, herself,
wrote.

Whether to remain true to his party
and country, on the one hand, and his
sweetheart on the other, is the per-'
pexing problem for Professor Eduard
Oldendorf, editor of the "Union" to
solve. It is this role which Fred B.
Wahr will play. Last year, as a lead-
ing actor, Mr. Wahr made such a suc-
cess that he was again chosen for an
important role An this year's produc-
tion. Besides coming from German
parentage, he is a teaching assistant
in the German department.

Great, who appears in the next col-
umn to the right, makes, with her hus-
band, the greatest character couple
that has probably ever been presented
on the German stage. With a vast Born wi
amount to convey, and but few words kraut dang
to say it in, Vera M. Burridge, has a in one ha
great task upon her hands to aid her other, Joh-
marital . partner in producing the light of t
laughs of the evening. over whose
Miss Burridge, who spent her days white and
until recent years in Philadelphia, ing in thi:
later in Grand Rapids, and finally De- then movin
troit, has seen much service upon the six years 1
stage. Taking the leading role in try Mr. Sii
three high school plays, and three club It is, th
performances of great pretentions, she he shound I
has become so accustomed to the role of Piel
plaudits of large audiences, that and politi
"treading the boards" is almost sec- several tin
ond nature with her. particular,
This will be Miss Burridge's second eted entir
appearance in a university function, the secon
the last time being when she delivered known wh4
the undergraduate toast at the Wo- plays are
man's League banquet in March. , scene."
The most active of the Conserva-
tives in "Die Journalisten," the man
who brings about the final rupture be-
tween Oberst Berg and Oldendorf, who
induces the Colonel to accept the nom-
ination against the Professor, and the
man who directs the Conservative
campaign is Senden, a rich country
gentleman. Fred L. Meeske has been
entrusted with this important part,
because of his known ability as an ac-
tor, and as a German speaker.

enior play,
er of sev-
paved the
e produc-
the reci-
asses, was

took the'
th the mu-
stmas holi-

DCUTSCMER

U[RL(U

PRESWUTS

ITI

rowous

LOJIDY

I

;

7

r-

I

-'

t in a role particularly fitting to
John R. Minor has been winning
use from his fellow actors in re-
als by his wonderfully sympa-
presentation of "Schmock," the
abused "houn'" of the "Corio-
He Ys sure to bring down the
with his pathetic descriptions of
isusage.
ile a student in the Ashe'ille (N.
Sigh school, Mr. Miner gained
much experience in the art of
;ling, which has proved invalua-
him as a help in mastering his

fiT

I

uc wtlITIQtyl

f RID89

OPRIL

2,6

FRED L. MEESKE when
While in high school at Muskegon, mana
Mr. Meeske played the leading role in enter
"The House Next Door." This play mana
was produced 'by special permission Piepe
of Cohan and Harris, and under the latin
.personal direction of the latter thea- Older
trical manager. With such coaching self,
one must indeed be slow not to learn enen
a great deal about the art of acting. brink
But his dramatic experience is not ProfE
limited to this one play. For three Th
years, one of the clubs to which Mr. amus
Meeske belonged produced a play actoi
semi-annually under the direction of a tive
professional coach. It is worthy of As
note, that with the exception of the tenth
very first production, he carried the bourn
leading roles. for h

The Deutscher Verein brought Count In its twenty-five years of existence,
Rudolph von Herzog to the University thq Deutscher Verein has had a total
last year and he spoke to a large en- membership of over 5,000. There are
thusiastic audience. about 300 in the Verein this year.

You are invited to attend

his part 1
roe in , -i

FOUR

TALKS

By Members of the German Faculty
on "Die Journalisten"

COLONEL OBERST BERG TO A
BE ACTED BY OTTO FUELBER.,
In the role of Colonel Oberst Berg,
Otto E. Fuelber will appear for the
fifth time in a university production. As
the retired conservative Colonel, Mr.
Fuelber has a splendid opportunity to
show his capabilitites as a dramatic
actor. Harassed by the conficting
emotions of party loyalty, pride, and
love for his daughter, he finds himself
in many very tragic circumstances.
Mr. Fuelber, who comies from the
Fort Wayne (Ind) High school, be-
sides having taken part in many ama-
teur operas and shows, also played in
Michiganda, Koanzaland, Dr. Klaus,
and Der Dumkopf.
Over two-thirds of the students in
the literary department are taking
work in German. This is the largest

roles in the
plays prece
Having seen
many by th
dians, he ha,
valuable poin
be played.

Tomorrow,

Tuesday,.

Wednesday,

an a
!emi

Thursday at 4:10 P. M.

Efforts w
Michigan al
kopf" tour
fused to gra
Easter vaca
I

HAZEL D. ALBANO.
Miss Albano plays the character
le of the many-time married "fremde
enzerin." In her unusually witty
stume, she is bound to call forth

in

Sarah Caswell An

Hall

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