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April 21, 1912 - Image 1

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1912-04-21

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C

Michigan

Daily

ANN ARBOR,,MICHIGAN, SUNDAY, APRIL 21, 1912.

w - .

ATERUS IELE VT OF FIVE US.
and Jeffersoniln Choosc-
ers for Ensuing Year.
Webster and the Jefferson-
es elected officers at their
ast night, to serve for the

DIRTY TOWELS.
STILL IN USE
lii estigalion Sliow IUnsanitary Condi-
tions Not Improved; Paper
Towels nsuccessful.
EXPENSE IS THE MAIN OBSTACLE

VARSITY CLINCHES
CONTEST IN FIRST
0. S. I. Is nable to Overcome Lead
of File Runs Cained in the
Initial Inning.

ENtA'FkE ER S 11ANE BI8W

4

"BA VET.

I

I Results of the Webster election arc
as follows: president, Percy L. Pot-
ter; vice-president, Edward M. Sharpe;
secretary, Maxwell A. Kramer; treas-
L urer, C. IL. Currah; critic, Buck; or-
( atorical delegate, Solomon Blum rosen;
sergeant at arms, A. F. Otto.
Jeffersonians chose the following
men: president, Charles H. Avery;
) vice-president, F. L. Pulley; secretary,
J. R. Conley; treasurer, F. J. Brennen;'
; sergeant at arms, Peter 'Balkema; crit-
ic W. T. Bie; and oratorical delegate,
B. J. Jonkman.
d FINZEL WILL INTROI)CCE
r' FE~ATURE S AT "JAMBOREE,"
It
- Joint Junior Lit and Engineer lhnec
ts at Armory Will Be
y Big Affair.
y Several unique feature dances will
s be introduced by Finzel's orchestra of
:t Detroit at the Junior 'Jamboree," to
be given by the junior classes of the
n literary and engineering departments
h 'next Wednesday evening. The dance
h will be held in the Armory, and those
g in charge are preparing for a i'ecord-
d breaking attendance.
e The chaperons will be Prof. and Mrs.
t E. D. Rich, representing the engineer-
1 ing department, and Mr. and Mrs. Chas.
Loos, for the literary department. Re-
e freshments will be served to those
- who desire them at fifty cents per
d couple.
t, Tickets for the affair are on sale at
e one dollar, and may be obtained from
n the social committees of the respect-
s ive classes. A limited number will
d be sold to students outside the two'

NOURIE

PERMITTED !F(

PLAY.I

Following the receipt of several
complaints concerning the condition of
towels in wash rooms about the cam-
pis, The -Michigan Daily yesterday
sent a representative to makes a gener-
al investigation of the towels in use.
Practically all of the lavatories in uni-
versity buildings were visited, and it
was ascertained that nearly all con-
tained towels liberally smeared with
dirt.
In many cases the towels were so
soiled as to be unfit for use. It was
foupd generally that they were too
small for the needs of the respective
wash rooms.
"All janitors have strict orders to
change the lavatory towels as soon as
they become soiled," said J. H. Marks,
superintendent of buildings and
grounds, when seen last evening. "I
can't understand why this has not been
done, but I will make sure that the of-
fending janitors hear from any cases
that are reported in the future.
"Our experiment with paper towels
did not prove entirely successful. They
were thrown about the floor after be-
in used, and were probably no more
sanitary than the common roller tow-
el. Beside this, their expense was pro-
hibitive, it costing something like one
dollar a day to provide towelling for
one roller.
"It seems to me that the only solu-
tion of the problem is to have the pres-
ent towels changed more frequently.,
Sometimes the towels in a wash room
are dirtied in a few minutes-for in-
stance, after being used by seven or
eight men who have been out prac-
ticing landscape gardening. It is often
impossible for the janitor to discover,
the condtion of the towels at once, andl
they are allowed to remain for somea
time without being changed."t
Dean V. C. Vaughan, of the medical"
department, believes with Supt. Marks
that the paper towels are not practica-
ble, and thinks that the only expedient
is to use more care in keeping the rol-
ler towels in good condition,.

Five runs in the first inning, sewed
up the game with O. S. U. for Michigan

yesterday afternoon, and left a rathej
listless and uninteresting eight in-
nings to drag along. At no time wer c
the Ohio boys dangerous and their twc
scores came in the last two innings
and after all hope of a close score had
gone. The very onesidedness of the
contest prevented its being interesting
and there were no fast plays pulled off,
"Smi" Smith pitched the -first seven
innings and the Buckeyes were help-
less before him, eight of them whiff-
ing and only three hits being register-
ed against his delivery.
One surprise brought out by the
game was the fact that Nourie, the
A. . man from St. Viature had been
declared eligible by the board and he
appeared at the third corner. The
matter was not finally decided until a
few hours before the game, and Rickey
at once put him in. His playing was
fair, but showed a lack of practice, and
his one error cost Michigan a run. The
decision of the board in this case will
probably settle a dispute in regard to
eligibility that has been a hard nut to
crack, and henceforth, A.B. men from
unrecognized schools will be consider-
ed eligibles,
Michigan's Playing is Slow.
Snyder, who did the twirling for 0.
S. U. was easy in the first inning but
tightened up after that and only in the,
sixth did he waver. His support, how-
ever was not of the best. Michigan's
playing was good in form but showed
a woetul lack of "pep," due perhaps
to the five run lead, This mechanical
slowness has been noticeable in both
games so far. Ward was allowed to
pitch the last two innings again yes-
terday but failed to show the form he1
displayed Friday. It was due to his
delivery that Ohio got her tow tallies.
Just what he could do in a whole game
is problematical,
First Inning Decides Outcome.
The game was practicaly decided in -
the first inning, Duncanson hit and
Bell was safe on Snyder's error though.
Duncanson was caught trying to reach
third on the play. Mitchell walked and
he and Bell pulled off a double steal.
Munson hit to the infield and Bell was
caught between home and third but
finally the ball bounced off his back
permitting him to score, Then follow-
ed the slaughter. Lavans doubled to
center, Rogers tripled to right, and
Howard poled out one for two sacks.
When the 'smoke cleared away five men
had crossed the plate. Michigan did
not score again until the sixth. Nourie
hit and was safe on Snyder's error.
Duncanson hit to third but the worthy
guardian of that sack heaved the ball
into the grand stand and Nourie scor-
ed, Bell got in the way of a curve and
Mitchell hit, filling the sacks. Munson
raised a sacrifice fly and Bell came
home, concluding the scoring.-
Ohio's runs came in the eighth and
ninth. Reilly walked, stole second and
scored on Nourie's error. In the ninth,
(Continued on page 4.)

Prof. Zoivski Tells How to Secure
Eficiency,
One of the largest and most enthu-
siastic banquets ever given by.the En-
gineering society was held at the Mich-
igan Union last night.
Jerry Collins, '12 E, president of the
society, introduced the toastmaster
George Bancroft to the eighty or more
members who were present. John Eck-
hart related many of the humorous
little incidents of the mechanical en-
gineers spring trip. "Tommy" Hugh-
itt, '15 E, "Jack" Brent, '14 E, "Ted"
Seeley, '13 E, and Ira Hook, '12 E,
spoke on the outlook on college life H
from the viewpoint of their respective
classes. Pr
In response to the toast "Efficiency,"
Prof. S. J. Zowski said, "In designing
my turbines I sent my wife away first
thing, then I forgot all the mathemat-
i s that I knew and took a pencil in un
one hand an eraser in the other and th
started to work depending on common ne
sense to aid me." Fil
Gardiner S. Williams spoke on po
"Practice" and Prof. C. T. Johnson th
concluded the program with a few ho
short stories. pa
Dean Mortimer E. Coolky who was Pr
to speak was unable to attend on ac- Un
count of illness. cei

FI111

a

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AD

rof.

Com

eFI
ws

rt I

Mt, WORCES.TER OF BOSTON TO
FINISH SERIES OF LECTURES.
Dr. Elwood Worcester, Rctcr of the
Emmanuel Church, Boston, will deliv-
er two lectures at the Episcopal church
today, at 10:30 and 7:30 p. m. His sub-
ject in the morning will be "The Titan-
ic Disaster." The lectures are given
on the Slocum Founlation fund. Dr.
Worcester spoke here twice, during
the winter.
He will give two. more talks next
Sunday and it is probable that he will
remain in Ann Arbor during the
week and hold office hours at Ylarris
hall, the guild house of the hurh.

tic
sei
tai
ag
foi
tI
giv
no
po'
als
me
by
po,
F
hay

at he would ]
sition as he,
rtment of M
of. Roth ha
iversity, and
tly to tend(
n here at til
mnester, little
ned that ne,
ain at the h
r which he h,
The reason fo
'en last night
th seems to
licies of the l
o the warm
nt. A conces
the Regents
ssible cause.

SJLEAGiUE TO IN'ST'ALL,
Y'EAR'S OFF~ICERS, HLAY ?4,

a At a meeting of the Women's League
Board yesterday morning it was decid-
ed to change the date for the installa-
h tion of the officers for next year to
r. May 24 instead of the afternoon follow-
)t ing, the annual Field Day, as here-
e, tofore. It is planned to make a larger
- affair of the installation this year. All
e League members will receive invita-
11 tions and there will be speeches,. re-
'n freshments, and dancin-.
e The annual election will take place
S- early in May and contrary to the usual
custom the polls will be left open all
day,

of
>r-

PHOTOGRAPH A DEVELOPING
NEW STAR AT OBSERVATORY

banquet Photographs of the new star which
ets and was discovered a few weeks ago by
regular Enebo, the European astronomer, are
or C. H. being taken nightly at the university
y mem- observatory when it is not too cloudy.
furnish or when other atmospherical condi-
tions do not interfere. A study of the
toasts: photographs discloses the fact that the
.rd, Ed- star is following certain successive
ire. Hal conditions like other new stars. It is
master. receding from the stellar stage to the
xpected nebular type, being now about the
sixth magnitude and barely visible to
the naked eye,

BA1TES INViTEID TO SPE1AR
AT BIG AILUMNI BAN 9ET.
Dean Henry M. Bates, of the law
department, was formally invited to
[represent the Michigan Union at the,
St. Louis Alumni banquet that is to be
given on Saturday, April 27. Dean
Bates was not in the city yesterday
and it is not known whether or not it
will be possible for him to .accept the
offer.
The banquet is intended to be for
the middle west alumni what the New
York banquet in December 1911 was
for the graduates living in the east.
Several members of the faculty have
been delegated to represent the uni-
versity at the dinner,

UNION BULLETIN STARTS WORK
Baseball Iesults will be Posted by
Innings, Tomorrow.
Baseball reports will, be received
inning by inning at the Michigan Un-
ion, and posted on the bulletin for the
first time Monday afternoon. The com-
mitteemen have each been assigned
definite hours to be on duty to post'
the returns, and the work will continue
until the end of the semester, results
being received each day. For the pres-
ent, tickler returns will be used.
FERItGUSON AND ANNAN ro
WARBLE AT UNION TODAY.
Carlisle Ferguson, '12 L, famous in
three Michigan operas, heads the list
of entertainers who will furnish the
regular Sunday afternoon program at
the Union today. He 'will sin; a num-
ber of the opera hits and also will in-
clude several popular songs. Claude
Annan, '12 L, who has been a member
of the University glee clubs for three
years, will also sing.
Edward Howell, '13, E, and Theodore
Seelyen, '13 E, will complete the .pro-
gram with piano duets of a semi clas-
sical nature. The program starts at
3 o'clock and light refreshments will
be served to the Union members.
UNION ADDITION IS REAlY
FOR CARPENTERS TO START .
Carpenters will start operations on
the Michigan- Union addition on Mon-
day. The foundation and concrete workf
have been completed and actue< con-
struction on the woodwork will now bc
started. The building will be complet-
ed by June 1.
Chaperons Annouined for Dance
The faculty men and their wives
who have been invited to chaperon the
Barrister, Vulcan, and Druid dance to
be given at Granger's tomorrow night,
are: Dean and Mrs. M. E. Cooley, Dean
and Mrs. H.'nM. Bates, Dean and Mrs.
J. R. Effinger; Professor and Mrs. C.
T. Johnston, Prof. and Mrs. Evans
Holbrook, and Prof. A. H. Cross.

time. His interest in Michig
is well known, and the
which he has brought upc
partment here, is too famili
repeating.
He had not yet tendered
resignation here, but had in
ing so at the close of the sen
he had signified to the Ith
versity that he would accep
The decision to remain calls
tracting or reconsideration
papers. The release from
not a release in the true sen
consent to leave Michigan' f
had been but verbal, and i
measures had been taken.
"You bet I am going tc
Michigan"said the professor
"You know I am a thorough
man, and it is with great ple
I now feel that I am really
remain. I should rather n
present why I changed my
suddenly, but you can know t
on account of the changing c
there that I made up my min(
Prof Hill Contemplated (
Subsequent to Prof. Roth's
to resign his position there c
of the resignation of Prof. (
of the Forestry department.
ter had closed with the Gc
Forestry service to tike up p
al work for it next year. W
not the resignation of Prof.
anything to do with this mc
part of Prof. Hill is not kn
whether Prof. Hill, who en
siderable prominence as a
member here and as an exp
profession in wider circles,
consent to remain could not
out last night, as Prof. Hill i
the city when the paper wen
It is hoped that Prof. Roth'
may induce him to stay.

ra met last
line which
Adelphi in
ld May 18.

in con-
e." An
led the
ve, Al-

ALL CAMPUS SOCIETIES ASKEl)
TO PARTICIPATE IN PAIIADE,
Formal invitations asking every
campus society to participate in the-
Seventy-fifth Anniversary Celebration
have been sent out by Dean Effinger
The replies are to be sent to Prof,
Bursley, chairman of the undergradu-,
ate participation in the celebration, at
once.
The main part which the organiza-
tions will take in the celebration will
be participation in the parade that has
been planned. A number of the or-
ganizations have already decided to
take part in the affair, but the author-
ities wished ot have definite promises
so that they could proceed with ar-
.rangements.

Manager of "Wolverine" Slarts ork.
John H. Payne, busInes manager of
the Wolverine, is planning to meet all
students who wish to try out for the
business staff of .the summer paper to-
morrow between the hours of "1#:00 and
3:00 p. m., at The Michigan Daily of-
fice. l3esides the assistant business
manager there are a large number of
other positions on the staff to be filled.
Any student who is to be here in sum-
mer school and who is interested in
this line of work is urged to try out..

Gayle Dull, '09, Track Star, Marries,
Announcements were received yeses
terday of the marriage of Gayle Dull,
captain of the '09 track team, to Miss
Anna Loretta Sittler in Pittsburgh.
While in the university Dull was prom-
inent in campus activities and was a
member of Sphinx.

los-
ik-

IIesbtcta C urcb
L~eorard A. Barrett, M iv ster
10:30 A. M. THE UNCERTAINTY OF LIFE
7:30 P.M. SHIPWRECK

Freshmen Girls Entert
About 150 girls were
Sophomore Frolic, a re
ed to the sophomore gir
men. The party was
afternoon in Barboi
There were several fea
dances, and refreshmen
Dean Myra B. Jordan
affair.

Titanic

Memorial

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