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March 28, 1912 - Image 1

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1912-03-28

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1

1kg

Daily

T

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, 'THURSDAY, MARCH 28, 1912.

of All Alum.I

niversity alumni or undergraduates
o wish to know what any one of the
ny thousands of Michigan gradu-
s is doing, or where he is, may find
when the general catalogue is
ued this spring. This book, com-
nly known as the decennial calen-
r, will contain the names, .iuresses,
1 occupations of the living alumni of
university, and the names of de-
sed alumni as far as it has been
ssible to secure such information.
Prof. I. M. Demmon is in charge of
work of editing the catalogue, and
has required three years to obtain
necessary data concerning the 40,-
alumni whose names will be in-.
ded in the volume. The last time
calendar was issued in 1902 and
class of 1901 was included then.
e names of the class of 1911 will be
this year's edition whic1 will be
ger by about 12,000 names than
t of 1902. It is Prof. Demmon's aim
have the book ready for use by
mnmencement. time.
O-LE BACK" GARGOYLE IS OUT.
zling Answer to Sorority Number
Goes on Sale Today.
The shrieking of freshmen and the
iling of men tells the story: The
rgoyle is off the press. Ye Gods,
at petty things we are. Shades of
iazon, what a portrayal of manless-
ss. For they have come back with
punch, an uppercut that floors-
se women of ours.
Cartoons galore, "showing up" mere
,n, tales and anecdotes, all belittling
mighty brawn -of Michigan, fea-
'es the work of the girls. Toques are
fed to the editress and "contribu-
-esses" who have turned out the
nner.
'ION MEMBERSHIP DINNER
TO BE HELD THIS EVEMING.

FORESTERS MAY SPEND THEIR
VACATION PLANTING TREES.
The weather permitting, foresters
who remain in Ann Arbor during
spring vacation will have a chance to
get some practical work, and at the
same time earn a little spending mon-
ey. Several thousand tree seedlings are
to be planted some time this spring on
the Barnes farm at Geddes, and follow-
ing the custom of several years, the
work will be done during spring vaca-
tion, providing the weather is favora-
ble. Just at present the deciding fac-
tor does not seem auspicious, for all
frost must be out of the ground and all]
soil must be fairly dry before planting
can be begun.
All foresters who wisch to take part
in the work should communicate with
Mr.Leigh Young of the forestry depart-
ment,
PLANS FRESHMAN
STRENGTH TESTS
Muscles of First Year Men to
Undergo Inspection
Next 1alIl

APRIL FOOLS'' DAY WILL BE
FEATURED BY SENIOR LAWS
The senior laws will hold an All
Fools' dance at Granger's, April 1. The
committee in charge of the affair in-
tends to have everything in connection
with it appropriate to the day and has
issued an invitation, in the form of a
"capias ad satisfaciendum," which must
be served upon a lady. It orders her
to appear before Judge "Ike" Fischer"
and show cause why execution should
not issue against various articles nam-
ed.
As a program, the senior law Crease:
will be given out. It is a four page
publication, containing "grinds" on
the members of the class and quips
about various institutions connected
with the department.
The committee reports a rapid sale
of tickets.
TUNEFUL COMEDY,
GIVEN BY WOMEN
"In Old Bagdad" is the Title of
Quaint Play Introduced
By Juniors

NOTED SONG WRITER TO GIVE
RECITAL HERE THIS EVEING.
Carrie Jacobs Bond Will Sing Quaint
Songs Which Have Gained
Wide Attention.

From the homely obscurity of a lit-
tle Wisconsin logging camp to a posi-
tion as one of the world's most fam-
ous song writers, is the enviable rep-"Le MA
utation possessed by Mrs. Carrie Jac- Has
obs Bond, who will render a program
of her own songs in Newberry hall this hear
evening. Bow
Ten years ago Mrs. Bond was the
wife of a struggling physician in a PLAY D]
northern Wisconsin town. Her hus-
band died and she was forced to face Ambition
the world and make her livelihood. For
She left the camp in which she had liv-
ed and went to Chicago. Now and then
the bigness of little things, the philos- For the
ophy of which she had learned in her
northern home, found its way into the Cere
verse, the local
Finally one of Mrs. Bond's friends Whitney
persuaded her to have her work put play. "i
on the market. She sold her first elev- the most
en compositions for $35.00. Finally a
kindly publisher took charge of her Edouard
songs and they attained almost instant wasGhee
popularity because of their simplicity lie of Pa
and pathos. the first
The recital this evening, which will otfar s
be given under the auspices of the "Hernia"
Y. W. C. A., will begin at 8 o'clock. If the
is enal

Inc

SYSTEM UTSED AT OTHER SCHOOLS I TO BE iLEPEA TED FRIDAY NIGHT .

Dr. G. .. May announces that, be- A large and enthusiastic audience PICTURES TO BE SHOWN T,

rd Dinner

ginning with next year, a series of+
strength tests will be made upon every
freshman, in addition to the physical
measurements made at present. The
tests will be made in the fall and
spring so that each student may know
the amount he has gained in strength
during the year.
A system known as the intercollegi-a
ate strength test, and consisting of.
tests of grip, pull up, push up, back
and legs, will be used. The apparatus,
which was purchased some time ago,
registers upon dials the pounds of
strength developed and the total con-
stitutes the final grade of each man.
The tests will be used merely for com-
pa'rative statistics and not. as a medi-
um of competition.
These tests have been used at Har-
vard and other schools for several
years but, because until recently many;
physical directors thought that they
were likely to cause more injury than
good, they have not been adopted here.
Next week Dr. May will explain and il-
lustrate fully the strength system to
the advanced classes in gymnasticgs.
NOTORIOUS EX-CONVICT IS
EXAMINED AT HOSPITAL HERE
"G. A. Kimell," the hero of one of
the most spectacular trials in the his-
tory of legal procedure, spent a part
of the day in Ann Arbor on Monday. He
went to the University hospital where
three specialists examined him with
the idea of having him submit to an op-
eration to trepan the skull in order to
restore his memory. One of the sur-
geons declared that such an operation
would prove exceedingly dangerous
and that he would only have one
chance in a hundred of recovering.

composed of senior and junior girls
witnessed the first performance of "In
Old Badgad" last evening in Sarah
Caswell Angell hall. This is the
eighth annual play presented by the
junior girls in honor of the seniors,
and is a pretty, appealing comedy of
trifles; of quaint things, quaint people
and quaint places, made charming .by
clever music and costumes. The book,I
which is in three acts, is of a partic-
ularly interesting and humorous trend
and gives good opportunity for a bright
score.
There are nineteen players in the
cast,-nineteen people whose charac-
terizations of Old Bagdad ring so true
that one is almost transported there
for the evening. Gladys Stowell and
Mary Palmer, as the two students,'
were received with much enthusiasm.
Elaine Shields took the laughable role
of Shampoo, while the part of Badou-
ra, the Caliph's daughter, was splen-
didly handled by Beulah Dillingham.
The "Violet Song"' and "Just for a
Smile" were perhaps the most delight-
ful of the several tuneful melodies.
Louise Conklin and Eva Hanks are
responsible for the book and lyrics,
and Earle Moore, of Union opera fame,
composed the music. The play is un-
der the stage direction of Mr. Herbert
A. Kenyon. The play committee is
composed of Georgia Maier, Ruth Post,
Esyllt Jones and Beulah Dillingham.
The second performance will be giv-
en tomorrow night for the alumnae of
the university.
The cast follows:
Caliph of Bagdad, of Michigan ..
.Marguerite Stanley
Percy Adair, of Michigan........
......... . . Gladys Stowell
(GCntinued on page 4.)

Lyman Howe to Preset Travel Views
In University Hall.
Lyman .H. Howe will present his
"Travel Festival" in University hall
this evening at 8 o'clock under the
auspices of the Womon's League and
the Homeopathic Guild.
The "Travel Festival" is a series of
riotion pictures which depicts mountain
climbing in the Alps, hydroplane man-
euvers, hunting by acroplane, the last
review of the United States navy, and
travel pictures of the Grand Canyon,
Italy and France. These-pictures have
been exhibited before audiences at all
of the larger universities in the coun-
try, and everywhere Mr. Howe has.met
with success.
Admission to the entertainment will
be 25, 35 and 50 cents.

fective.
The

'II

ts for the third member-
nner of the> year, to be held
Jnion this evening, are selling
ely rate. - Only seventy-five of
teboards will be disposed of,
se that are left may be obtain-
e Union any time today.
euben Peterson, of the medi-
ilty, and Mr. William A. How-
the School of Music, will be
sts of honor at tonight's din-
ich will commence promptly at
k. Roscoe Bonisteel, '12 L, will
as toastmaster.
CANVASS HAS COMMENCED

PLAN FOR SECOND PRESENTATION trin
of a
Oratorical Association Play May Be love
Repeated in University Hall. for c
According to the plans of the Ora- in lc
torical' Association, the second pro- come
duction of Tobin's comedy, "The Hon- lectu
eymoon," will be staged in University. IItsc
hall instead of the Whitney theater, as is se
originally planned. is al
The reason for producing the play est V
for the second time is merely a finan- low
cial one, and since the scenery is not lioni
at all necessary to its success, "The Dc
Honeymoon" would lend itself readily been
to the limited scenery that could be lege
used in the auditorium, and would be the
produced in much the same manner as the:
tlie Ben Greet plays. peci

I dra
rmict

Work of Finding Rooms for Anniver-
sary Guests Will End Tuesday
The work of the Accommodation
committee, that has been appointed
by the Union to secure rooms and
boarding places for the Seventy-fifth
Anniversary Celebration guests, will
be completed by next Tuesday. Twen-
ty-five students are working on the

Ca rrie J co a Bond

PROF. FLORER MAKES ANSWER es last night, a
TO EDITORIAL CRITICISMS. fill the vacancy
The seat salE
In an address on Socialism given the Whitney tc
Tuesday evening before the Presbyte- be on sale uni
rian Brotherhood, Professor W. W. night. The pri
Florer, of the German department, re- to a dollar.
plied to those newspapers which had
criticised him editorially for a talk he Former Studei
gave at Jackson several weeks ago. G. McClellan
He spoke of the conditions under cently appoint
which the average home is built today schools in Owo
and refuted the claims that Socialism tending the s4
has reduced infant mortality, masters' club.

Recital of her own songs.

of the canvass will be
ise in June* and will be
the employment bureau
;n Union plans to main-
Qdents next October.

Tonight

pam.

tain for

In Newberry Hall Auditorium. Tickets 50O

CATION for the girls, CONDEMNATION of the boys, CONSTERNATION for everybot

Come

Back

Number,

of

the

Out this afterpoon
while you can

Easily the best yet

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