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March 13, 1912 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1912-03-13

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Michigan

Da

y

I

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 13, 1912.

r

claimed to typify hypocrisy, deceit and
perjury, and is severely rapped. The
radical views of the small schools are
pointed out to show that harmony is
im~ipossible,and the stand against the re-
sumption of Michigan games completes
the list of charges. It is a concise,
strong, and direct charge against the
western body.
May Mean Breakup of Conference.
If the withdrawal of Illinois really
occurs many believe that the confer-
ence will break up. Although some-
what quieted down, the feeling of the
student body of Minnesota is still alive
and ready to burst forth at the first'
opportunity. These two schools have
been the real financial support and
backbone of the conference, and in re-
turn, have had their wishes and desir-
es turned down. The mass meeting
will be held at Illinois tonight, and as
faculty action on the petition is ex-
pected in a short time, the outcome
will be watched with interest here.
There are still open dates for desira-
ble conference schools, and Michigan
may boast some schedules soon that
will look like old times.

STAR MILER MAY*
NOT RUN INDOORS
Hanai-an Dislikes to Take Chances on
Wooden Track and Prefers
to Work out Doors.
GAMBLE'S INJURY NOT LOCATED.

may
Han
n as
ma

y be entirely possible that Ed=
pavan the star miler count-
a sure point winner this sea-
y not compete in the indoor
his year. While such an event
e a dfstinct loss to Michigan
s, it is planned to train him
r the Intercollegiate and the
meets this spring. Hanavan
like to run indoors and, as it
his running and health, he
refers the outdoor work. Es-
is he adverse to training on
den track and so far this sea-
done all that work outdoors
the inclement weather. It is
possible that he will decide to
indoors at the last minute, but
present Eddie wants to wait
hier athletes will be willing to

WORK, ON ANNUAL
IS WELL ADVANCED
Entire Fraternity and Organization
Section Has Been Placed in
Hands of Printer.
PROMISE A MONUMENTAL WORK.
With the last grave senior's picture
on its way to the engraver's table,
where it will be prepared. for Inser-
tion in th "family album," assurance
of an early edition of this year's an-
nual is given. The fraternity section
of this encyclopedic work has been in
the hands of the printers for several
weeks and today will see a large or-
ganization section turned over to them.
Both the literary and art features
of the book will receive tne special at-
tention of the editors trom now on.
From the quality of material contribu-
ted, and the promptness with which
it was submitted, those 1n charge are
led to promise a monumental work for
the class of 1912. Originality and dis-
tinction are predicted for the general
make-up of the volume. In spite of
its ponderous size the management
will positively not publish an India
paperedition.
The engraving is in the hands of
the Bureau of Engraving of Minneapo-
lis, which did the work for the 1911
Michiganensian. The George Banta
Publishing Co., of Menasha, Wis., have
charge of the typographical work.
TO SHOW CHINESE WAR PHOTOS
Eye Witness of Revolution to Lecture
In Newberry Hall Tomorrow
'he. first pictures of the recent war;
in China to reach this country will be"
shown by Mr. F. P. Beale in Newberry
Hall March 14. Mr. Beale was in
charge of the government schools in1
the northern part of the Yellow Em-
pire at the time the war broke out. The
disturbance so interfered with hi 1
work that he discontinued it and fol-
lowed the armies with his camera and?
notebook, with the results that he will
show tomorrow evening. Mr. Beale
is advertised as the "Eye Witness" ofI
the Chinese Revolution. Tickets for
the lecture may be obtained from Miss
King at Newberry Hall, or at the Y.
M. C. A. office.
PURCHASE CONDITIONALLY
RELEASED BY JUDGE KINNE.7
G. L. Purchase, the remaining de-
fendant in the suit involving certain
members of the law faculty, was re-1
leased by Judge Kinne yesterday. His
discharge by the order of the court was
with the express condition that it
would not prejudice the rights of the1
parties in pursuing additional reme-j
dies, and that the previous imprison-
ment should not be interposed as a de-
fense in any subsequent proceedings.
Wheter or not the case will be carried
further is not known.
J. LITS DANCE AT ANNUAL
EVENING PARTY TONIGHT.
As the climax in the social program
of the year, the "Jay" lits will give
the annual evening party of the season
at Packard dancing academy tonight.
A special program has been ar-
ranged by the class quartette which
will render some f the latest popular

songs in true vaudeville style during
the dancing. The quartette's rendi-
tions will be interspersed by solos.
The class room of the course in
journalism at De Pauw will be fitted
up like a metropolitan newspaper office
and undergraduates taking the course
will be sent to gather news.
Three hundred new students enroll-
'ed in Columbia University at the begin-
ning of the second semester.

COMEDY CLUB TO
BIEREORGANIZED
Permanent Organization Will Soon
Replace the Uncertain One
Now Existing.
MEMBERSHIP IS OPEN TO ALL
After a thirty year existence as the
Comedy Club, which has played before
the student public of Ann Arbor, and
then dissolved at the curtain's last
drop, with nothing to the credit of its
members but a little fool's-head emn-
blem, that organization met yesterday
and proposed a constitution which will
reorganize the club, and place it on a
new basis and in a new position as re-
gards the university. The constitution
as proposed embraces many radical
changes, and now awaits only the in-
dorsement of a faculty committee be-
fore which it will be formally placed
today.
Instead of being a passing fancy and
effort with the dramatically gifted stu-
dents of the campus, it intends to or-
ganize as a club with a schedule of
regular monthly meetings which will
offer a program of some nature to be
proposed by a committee appointed for
the purpose. Dramatic literature will
be discussed, special assignments will
be given by members of the club on.
chosen plays, and various private in-
formal dramatic entertainments will be
given by the members. A room will
be secured to meet the new needs of
the club, and this will be equipped
with the leading dramatic publications,
and a library of dramatic works.
A On, perhaps more elaborate than
the one given in the past, will be given
to all members In good standing who
have performed publically for the clubt
one year, and this, the emblem they se-
cure for one year's work will be thel
only decoration that they receive, re-
gardless of the work of subsequentl
years.3
All Students Eligible.
All students in good standing who1
pass the examination of the club are
eligible as members. This examination
will take on the form of an annual try-
out before the proper committee and]
the successful ones who pass muster
earn admission into the club, whether;
they are later picked to .fill parts or
not. The new eligibility list will al-
low freshmen to enter the club, as
well as students who may be low in
their work. This would not mean thati
these should be allowed to play in thei
roles of the chosen play, for in accord-;
ance with the university ruling, theyi
are forbidden entering such an activity,
but t ey will be allowed to enjoy thei
privileges of the club and to enter into
all discussions and non-public activ-
ities.
With a membership limited to forty,1
the club will conduct monthly meet-
ings throughout the remainder of the
college year. The main effort will be
to get an early start and line up pos-
sible plays, which the club can pro-
duce next year, so that the choosing
of one of them will be made easier than
it has been in the past.
FIFTEEN YEARS AGO TODAY.
Baseball Coach Watkins was severe-
ly injured when hit by a random ball

in the practice cage.
Spring football practice was begun
on the campus.
TWENTY YEARS AGO TODAY.
Fifty-one candidates for the baseball
team were engaged in outdoor practice.
Entries were being received for an
athletic tournament to consist of box-
ing, wrestling and fancy fencing
matches.

Soph Lits, Senior Laws, and Junior
Engineers Win Contests in
Fast Time.
The championships of the various de-
partments were settled at Waterman
gym yesterday afternon when the
semi-finals of the relays were run off.
All the races were close and excellent
time was made especially by the soph
lits who tore off the eight laps in 1:55
:1. The sophomores defeated the jun-
ior lits, the senior laws won from the
freshmen, and the soph engineers lost
to the juniors, the time for the three
respective races being 1:55:2, 1:58:2,
1:56:3.

LAWS

This Fact an
vent i

MANY COLLEGES ARE INVITED
TO PARTAKE IN CELEBRATION
The Committee on Invitations for
the 75th Anniversary Celebration met
yesterday to discuss what colleges and
universities should be asked to send
delegates. About 200 schools were se-
lected.

idea su
of Tu
Michig
ior cla

F,

RELAY CHAMPIONSHIPS ARE
DETERMINED BY CLOSE RAC

JUDGE A C ANGELL
QUITS THE BENCH

ture to
ing th
seems
there
on the

In

Returns to Private Life With Health pres
Impaired by Confinement vag
and Heavy Duties. ted
bal
ACT IS LONG CONTEMPLATED altlh
- the
Alexis C. Angell, United States Dis- tion,
trict Judge for the eastern district of syst
Michigan and son of President Emeri- the
tus Angell, has forwarded his resigna- the
tion to President Taft and the latter, F
according to reports from the capital the
city, has accepted it. a v
The resignation is more or less of a noa
surprise, although it has been known tac
for several weeks that Judge Angell if th
has been contemplating a return to sett
private life. The close confinement, P
due to the heavy duties on the bench
seni'
has impaired the health of the judge, the
'and left but little time to devote to his be a
fomilay.

CI

A

is meet him in the open.
e Gamble's Injury Not Determined.
u- The X-ray pictures that were taken
y of Gamble's leg showed but little
is when developed yesterday. In some
d manner the plates were fogged and the
e- exact cause of the injury was not dis-
st tinct. Following a medical examina-
rs tion by Dr. Darling, the injured legw
of was placed in a cast and will be kept
g there for some time. The diagnosis
d revealed that the injury came from one
1- of two causes, either an extra bone in
the foot, or a broken arch. Until the
cast is remgoved and the cause made
e, certain it will be impossible to tell
or whether Gamble will be able to run
n- again this season or not.
in
t, PROF. D'OOGE WILL OPEN
ly NEW ART LECTURE SERIES.
le
o- A new series of art lectures, and
u- travel talks under the auspices of the
h Ann Arbor Art Association will follow
ae Professor H. R. Cross's lecture this ev-
ening on "Painting in the North of Eu-
rope," which completes the present
he series. Professor Martin L. D'Ooge
r- will open the new course with a lecture
k on "A Tour of Greece," March 19.

famiiy,
DATE SET FOR BASKETBALL FINAL c
-u
J. Lits and Soph Engineers to Clash
For Championship, March 20.
Wednesday, March 20, has been set
as the date of the final basketball
game of the interclass championship
series. The clash'will bring together
the junior lits and the soph engineers,
and a rivalry between the two depart-
ments represented by the basket tos-t
sers is already springing up. The en-
gineers are at present title holders, but
the lits, have made an excellent show-
ing and are out for blood. An admis-
sion of 25 cents will be charged forF
the game., Branch Rickey will proba-
bly act as one of the officials.

guarant(
the next

rvgl n --A-

Laws IH
The seni
Bonisteel,
ready deci

the c

Presi
the s
one.

ommo
be stu
sue
elcom

to

th
a

MYERS AND COMBES STAND
HIGH MEN IN BRIDGE PLAY
In the second lap of the Michigan
Union bridge tournament, played last
night, Mory Myers and Dick Combes
were high men, while E. R. Johnson
and E. P. Grierson consoled each other
at the lower end of the lin'e. Twenty-
five couples participated. The next
lap of the tournament will' be played
this evening at 7:15.
School of Music to Issue Bulletins.
The University School of Music will
publish a Summer School Bulletin. The
edition will reach about 20,000 copies.
Civil Service Exam Schedule is Out.
Students desiring to take the Civil
Service examination to be held here
on March 13 and 14 are requested to
appearin the library of the chemistry
building at 9 a, m. on these dates.

ma

PROFS. BOGL]
WILL AD
Professors TI
ert Bunker will
ers at the thirc
ner thathwill b
Union Thursda

r.

organization.
en up, as this
inference cast
ly one of the
-itation. 'The

Freshman Leaves for Washington.
Thomas Ross, '15, of Prescott, Ari-
zona, left yesterday for Washington,
D. C., where he will enter the Wash-
ington Army and Navy Preparatory
School. Ross intends to take the ex-
aminations for entrance to the U. S.
Naval Academy at Annapolis next
spring.

id Brodikey will
piano and violin.
at 6 o'clock.
PHI ALPHA TA
SEVERAL
Phi Alpha Ta
Arts fraternity,
the following mE
ters, George S
Cline, Edgar Mc

d unfit-
promise
stion is

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