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February 25, 1912 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1912-02-25

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

1

lichi gan

Dal

4

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 1912.
FAOSrFRA~S P

OF
' NIA llT

Ittend Y.W.C.
lor s at

RELIGIOUS WORK
BEGINS TONIGHT
Men and Religion Forward
Movement Opens With
Mass Meetings

MANY RESPOND TO,
RICKEY'S SUMMONS
Although Eighty - Three Ball
Tossers Report, Infielders
Are Needed

F ITUSSFFRAGIST SPE
lERE SATURDAY F
IMiss Pankhurst to Appear

inl

"igh

tables, stretched the
ie Y. W. C. A. parlors
:all, decorated with
ers, accompanied the
young women who at-
W. C. A. banquet, the
lie "Big Week" at New-
French acted as toast-
Angell was slated to
Claims of the Scholar-
forced to leave early
nan responded to the
ead. Grace Lockton
Claims of Friendship;"
on "The Claims of the
id Miss Conde, the
on "The Claims of Je-,

TO HOLD BANUJET TOMORROW. I POST PRACTICE HOURS IN GYM.

The next event in the week will be
a meeting at Newberry Hall this ev-
ening at 6:30 for all university women.
Miss Conde will speak on "Four Kinds
of College Girls I Have Met." The
meeting tomorrow will be at 7:30 at
Newberry Hall. Miss Conde will speak
on "The University Women's Attitude
Towards Faith." Lucile Stowe, '12,
and Josephine Davis, '12, will sing a
duet.
NOMINATE CLASS DAY OFFICERS.
Senior Laws Choose Representatives
For Commencement Week
Senior law officers for class day
were nominated at a meeting of the
class Friday afternon. Chief interest
seemed centered about class prophet,
G. M. Humphreys, L. F. Martin, A. R.
Dilley, and Victor R. Jose being nom-
inated for this place on the program.
Considerable enthusiasm was also
manifested in proposing candidates
- for Class Poet, P. H. Cale, Jack How-
ard, and Arthur Blaess receiving the
necessary impetus to start the cam-
7 paign. E. C. Middleton was the sole
choice of the class for Valedictorian.
L Walter K. Towers and Frank Hinks
will compete for Class Historian, while
the choice for the representative to
present the class memorial, lies be-
tween Langdon Larwill and 0. K.
Krietzberger.
A motion was made at the meeting
that the pictures of the class team
and other pictures that usually went
in the Michiganensian should be pub-
- lished in the March issue of the Mich-
igan Alumnus which is to have a spe-
cial supplement devoted to the law
d'epartment.. The motion was tabled,
however, without discussion.
UNMUZZLED CANINE MAY GET
XI PSI PHI MEN IN WRONG.
Because the bulldog belonging to
the Xi Psi Phi house bit
g Mail Carrier Kern, all the
r members may be arrested. Com-
e plaint was made that the dog was run-
ning unmuzzled in the streets and a
warrant was issue for the owner, but
r no one claimed the ownership of the
I animal and at present it is for the
city attorney to decide whether to en-
force the law and arrest all the mem-'
e bers or to let the matter drop.

The .Men and' Religion Forward
Movement commences its campaign
today in this city through the coopera-
tion of all the churches and both the3
university and city Y. M. C. A. A massI
meeting for young men will be held in
the Congregational church tonight at#
6:30 at which Rev. J. P. Huget, of De-
troit, will be the principal speaker.
Dean A. C. Peck, of Denver, will give
the chief address at a big mass meet-
ing for men at the Whitney theater
tonight at 7:30. Music at both mass,
meetings will be furnished by the uni-
versity Y. M, C. A. quartet.
The principal event for tomorrow is
a banquet for 500 men in the New Ar-
mory building. Men of national repu-
tation will speak, among them are
Dean A. C. Peck, Bishop C. D. Will-1
iams, of Detroit, and J. A. Van Dis,
of Kalamazoo. Prof. H. L. Wilgus, of'
the law department, will be in charge
of the affair.
Every day of the week there will be
student worker meetings in McMillan
Hall at which students interested in
the movement are invited to attend.
Programs of the week's campaign will
be distributed at all of the churches
today.
UNION HAS PLANNED ROYAL
ENTERTAINMENT FOR TODAY
Music loving members of the Michi-
gan Union will have ample opportuni-
ty to satiate their appetites this after-
noon. Instrumental, vocal and string
music, by campus bards, will fill the
program which will start at 3 o'clock
and contniue until 5 o'clock.
"Bos" Gage, peer of local players,,
and the leader for years in Michigan
musical circles, will bid farewell to
the campus, at the concert this after-
noon. Ernest Kanzler will assist in
the program with the violin.
Carlisle Ferguson, of Michigan Un-
ion Opera fame, will sing a number of
the latest solos and also give a number
of popular selections from the operas.
Don Daren, Irvie Lattimer, and TAeg-
inald Leitch will complete the pro-
gram with stringed instruments. Ci-
gars, cigarettes and cider will be serv-
ed as refreshments.
"Ike" Fischer with a five piece or-
chestra will play at the clubhouse
from 6 o'clock to 7 o'clock tonight.
Prof. F. N. Scott of the rhetoric de-
partment returned yesterday morning
from a trip east where he attended the
National Conference on Entrance Re-
quirements in English. While on his
way to New York he stopped off at
Poughkeepsie where he addressed the
students at Vassar.

A grand total of eighty-three aspir-
ants responded to the first call for7
baseball candidates at Waterman gym
yesterday afternoon, and the prediction
that there will be a fight for every po-
sition on the team seems verified. Yes-
terday's call brought'out some fine ma-
terial for practically every position
on the team and prospects for the year
look bright.
The thirty-two battery men who
were started to work Friday, were on
hand yesterday and are working hard
despite the tendency to sore arms.
Several of the hurlers are already be-
ginning to show class and it should
be a pretty fight for road twirlers, and
the large number insures at least,
plenty of reserve talent for home
games. The infield still is the big
problem and although some fast men
turned out the question is far from
settled. Granting that Shorty McMil-
lan will perform on third or at short,
there are still three places to sbe filled
and if the infield is poor, the strength
of the team is gone.
Outfield May be Broken.
It is entirely possible that the out-.
field of last year will be broken up'
and two of the men moved into the
smaller area. In case no new men'
qualify for the initial bag, Mitchell
may be appointed guardian thereof,
and if Jack Walch does not appear
i the mask, Munson seems the logical
man for that position. This will leave
two big .holes in the official outfield
and there should be a number of candi-
dates to ill them. But the number o
fly chasers who turned out yesterday
was very slight, many evidently think-
ing all the gardens had been awarded
and not thinking it worth while to try,
out. In view of the proposed change,
there seems to be plenty of opportuni-
ty for fast fielders and Coach Rickey is
anxious that more turn out for these
jobs.
First Cut Wednesday.
The large number of aspirants mak-
es it necessary to make the first cut
at a record breaking early hour, and
Wednesday will see the axe descend
for the first time. From now on train-
ing and practice starts in earnest and
those who do not show any ability will
be requested to make room. It is not
stated how many will be dropped at
this time but it is expected that only a
small number will depart. In view of
the size of the squad, it has been di-
vided into two sections 'and practice
hours will be arranged this week so
that the floor will not be so overcrowd-
ed.. These hours will be posted in the
gym and the squad will be divided in-
discriminately.

School hall as Guest of
Local Club.
Miss Sylvia Pankhurst, the noted ex-
ponent of equal suffrage, will speak
at the High School hall next Saturday
evening under the auspices of the
Equal Suffrage club.
Miss Pankhurst is one of the mili-
tant suffragists and has spent several
terms in English prisons and the hard
treatment she received there inspired
her to do a great deal to secure prison
-reform. in England. She has written
much on the industrial condition of
women, having worked in English fac-
tories to acquaint herself with condi-
tions there.
In this country Miss Pankhurst has
spoken in most of the large cities.
She addressed the Massachusetts Ju-
diciary committee on "The Social Stat-
us of Women." Her subject here will
be relative to the suffrage movement.
While in Ann Arbor, Miss Pankhurst
will be the guest of Mrs. Frederick
Waldron.
At the meeting of the suffrage club
yesterday the following officers were
elected: president, Mrs. Sara A. C.
Plummer; first vice-president, Mrs. A.
S. Warthin; second vice-president,
Mrs. V. C. Vaughan; recording secre-.
tary, Miss Mary Hinsdale; correspond-
ing secretary, Mrs. Maria T. Peel;
treasurer, Mrs. C. George, Sr.
ADMINISTRATIVE BOARD TO
PASS ON ENTRANCE RULES.
By special order of the Administra-
'tive Board, that body's ultimatum on
the findings of the sub-departmental
committees on ,entrance requirements
will be considered at the next literary
faculty meeting., No authentic data
concerning the nature of the proposed
hang es will bo vouchsafed by the au-

* *
*
* Y
*

La Fol
Clark
Bryan

*

Jers
was
pres
ing t
Thec
and
vote
W

to

thorities until after the ameeting . is ther
held. beenl
It has been known for some time pros
that the acceptance of vocational sub- chap
jects for entrance was being consid- ist 1
ered, and the possible extension of the an c
list of academic studies. It is also His

likely that the two types of require-
ments will be divided into groups of1
which only a limited number of com-
binations will be permitted.'
MAY RFCEIVE MEMENTO OF
SUNKEN BATTLESHIP MAINE.
Ann Arbor may be one of the for-
tunate cities to receive a piece of the
sunken battleship Maine, which is now
being raised from its resting place at
the bottom of Havana harbor. Con-
gressman Wedemeyer at present is
making the preliminary efforts and
Mayor Walz stated last evening that
the souvenir will probably be secured.
PROF. BIGELOW PUBLISHES
NEW VOLUME ON CHEMISTRY
Prof. S. Lawrence Bigelow has re-
cently published a work entitled"Theo-
retical and Physical Chemistry," which
deals with the fundamental principles
of general chemistry, from the experi-
mental, as well as the theoretical side.
The work consists of thirty chapters
comprised in about 540 pages, and is
published by the Century Company.
Junior Lits to Dance March 13.
The Junior Lits will give a dancing
party at the Packard Academy, Wed-
nesday, March 13, 1912. Tickets may
be secured from the committee-Hart,
Trible, Wilson and Dickinson.

the

date and
ing the c
thir vot
and then

sma
Will
thre

pledge
man, '7
the can

and although, sev
porters worked h
they could not co
organized operat:
cratic competitors
L Follette Ca]
At the last mom
the La Follette ad
force and pushed
of ffth place. '
tor's vote, was n
give him a place a
he came strong i
the contest. Ca
support yesterday
day and conseque
tion.
William Jennin
small portion of
supporters were
(Continued

wi

I,

Prof. Cross Lectures in Detroit.
ho Prof. H. B. Cross, of the fine arts de-
et partment, will deliver a lecture on
at "Idealism in Art" at the first Congre-
ee gational church of Detroit this evening.
e_ It is one of a series of lectures being
given in that church.

11t'rsbtertau Cburch
10:30-Preaching by Dean A. C. Peck, of Denver.
12:05-New Class on Social Service Problems for University
Women. Led by Miss INGLIS.

m

r

IM

aWM

get

Will speak to m4
meeting at -the
tional Church, 4
There will be no
services at the 4

... e
1

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