100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

January 25, 1912 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1912-01-25

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

1031 Zl

°'. r S
rl } 'F"
s sr e '1 y
4 r Z
f

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN. THURSDAY, JANUARY 25, 1912.

FIRE

THIS MORNING ROUTS
STUDENTS FROM SLUMBERS

e pub-
3 to be
of the

last evenirg when
ink tea" in the up-
the general libra-
re wasn't any tea
corn, minits and
usion. And not on-
nts were lunching+
sedy fashion while
bstance of numer-
after much sleuth-
e" detective work.
perclassman was
' Having invested
e in the edibles, he
g room with the
elf down to study.
ends entered, and
to help consume
s, conceived the
f treating the en-
rdingly he took the
ich was nearly as
k, and commenced
oom. As he hove
ivited the studious
r, in plain English
including several
pted and soon the
:ing room had ad-

imediately theI
went into ex-
he excited cub
rice weredi-

ing vio-I

A fire, which broke out at one o'clock
this morning in the Sugden rooming
house at 810 E. Washington street,gave
several of the roomers in the dwelling
a bad scare, but did little damage ex-
cept in the cellar of the house. When
the call of "Fire" was heard, most of
the roomers ran out into the yard, clad
only in pajamas, with books and arti-
cles of furniture under their arms. The
fire is said to have started from a bar-
rel of papers in the basement of the
house,
SOPH CLASSES TO
uNITE FOR D UE
New Armorv is to be Scene of
Latest Innovation in
Class Parties
TICKETS GO ON SALE TOMORROW.
The soph prom is to be revived. A
dance which should prove second only
to the Junior Hop, will be given by, the
sophomores of the literary and engi-
neering departments on the evening
of Friday, March 1, at the New Armory
This will be as near an approach to
the prom that was held by the soph-
omores in previous years, as is allow.
ed by the university authorities. The
last so-called sophomore prom was
scheduled to be held in 1908, but the
freshmen interfered. This dance is ir
no way to be an imitation of former
sophomore proms, but is intended on-
ly to bring the two departments of th
same year closer together. No inter-
ference from tire freshmen is antici-
pated.
The dance will be entirely informal
but in 'point of numbers and represen-
tation, the partly will probably be one
of the most important of the year. The
affair is limited to the members of the
two 1914 classes.
A feature of the ticket sale will b
the rivalry between the members of the
two departments to show the greater
represetation from the respective 1914
classes. Tickets have been printed in
two colors to represent each depart-
ment and the efforts of the lits and
engineers to be present in the greater
number should result in a large attend-
ance. The ticket sale is lim-
ited to 150. Tickets for the dance
will be in circulation tomorrow and
may be obtained from the social com-
mittees of the , two 1914 classes for
$1.50.
U. OF WASHINGTON DAILY TO
PRINT CAMPAIGN STATEMENTS
SEATTLE, WASH., Jan. 24.-Cam-
paign statements of platforms in stu-
dent elections will appear in the Uni-
versity of Washinton Daily this spring
Campaign cards and electioneering are
hereafter to be forbidden to office-as-
piring students, who, instead, are giv-
en the right to print their "platforms."
Regularly nominated candidates will
be given 200 words in which to declare
themselves, while those who win a
place on the ballot by pIetition will
have to tell their story in 100 words.
University Gets Liquid Air Machine.
'A liquid air machine is the latest
gift to the engineering laboratories.
The machine was presented by the
Brush Co., of Detroit. Mr. Brush is
the inventor of the Brush are and the
Brush dynamo, and attended the uni-
versity for a short time.

"The Daily Maroon," published by
the students of the University of Chi-
cago, issued a special Christmas num-
ber of eight pages, with an attractive
cover in colors.
At a recent vaudeville show present-
ed by the University of Wisconsin Un-
ion, a skit entitled "The Deserted Mill"
made an immense sensation.

DR. PARRY IS APPOINTED TQ
SERVE ON LABOR COMMITTEE
Dr. Carl E. Parry, of the econom
ics department, has been appointed by
Governor Osborn to represent the
State of Michigan at the eighth an-
nual conference of the National Child
Labor Committee, which will be held at
Louisville, Kentucky, next week. Of-
ficial notification of the appointment
was received yesterday, but Dr. Parry
was unable to state last evening
whether or not he would accept the
position.
ENGINEERS WIN A
HOCKEY VICTORY
Scien'ists are Defeated in an
Exciting ti ame Witnessed
by Large Crowd

er labor organs, have
nable than the argu-
manufacturers' asso-j
de against them, was
lecture given by Dr
e McNamara case, be-
Political Economy I.
.oon. Dr. Parry also
unionists doubted the
'idence presented by
3, on account of their
nce with private de-
ther brought out the
that the mayor o~f Los,
id engaged Burns to
dynamiters, withheld
of lack of confidence
er the trial was over
on was assured.

COMBINED TEAM TO PLAY LITS.
In a game that was exciting and in-
teresting from start to finish,the scien-
tists went down to defeat last night at
Weinberg's rink before the team from
the engineering department. The mod-
eration of the weather drew a large
crowd to the rink and the hockey pen
was surrounded by a ring of enthusi-
asts.
Owing to the fact that the exams
are only a few days off and that there
is little chance of completing the pro-
posed schedule in the few remaining
days, the team from the science de-
partments will play no more games.
A team picked from the engineers,
laws, and science team will play a
;ame with the undefeated lits, and the
contest promises to be one of unusual
interest. King, of the science team,
will probably manage the picked team
and will choose two men from each of
the other teams except the lits.
The lineup of last night's game:
Eng.- erman, goal; Smith, point;
Hughitt, cover point; Ratz, left wing;
Vivian, right wing; Crase, center; Ed-.
wards, rover. '
S&ientists-Cramley, goal; Stewart,'
pint; Shumaker, left wing; Bien, right
wing; Morrison, center; King, roVer.
Referee-Doyle. Time keeper-Hul-
art. Goal umpires, Sweeney and
Brown.
DI \MOND JUBILEE COMMITTEE
COMPLETES DRAFT OF PLANS.
A final meeting of the faculty com-
mittee in charge of arrangements for
the Diamond Jubilee was held in Pres-
ident Hutchin's office yesterday after-
noon. The final plans for the proposed
celebration were gone over care-
fully, and a completed draft of the
arrangements decided upon will be
submitted to the Board of Regents to-
morrow.
Homeop Alumnus to Practce In East.
Mr. Waldo W. Schairer, '11 H, who
has been an interne in the homeopath-
ic hospital since his graduation last
June, has resigned his position and
will leave for Rochester, N. Y., in a
few days, He will take over the gen-
eral practice of Dr. E. G. H. Beck, '03
H, and will be surgical assistant to
Dr. J. Mallory Lee, '78 H, at the Lee
private hospital.
MINNESOTA PLANS TO HELP
.STUDENTS PICK LIFE WORK.
MINNEAPOLIS, MINN., Jan. 24.-
Extension work from the outside in, is
is the plan of President Vincent of
the University of Minnesota, who is
bringing in 'business and professional
men to give weekly lectures to the
students with an aim to help the lat-
ter in choosing a life work, The in-
novation is the result of the studious-
ness President Vincent found in the
short courses for farmers and of the
investigations by a Columbia man who
discovered that the undergraduate who
seems to lack ambition is more often
merely undecided as to his future
plans.

19P2 FOOTIMLL ACI1EDULE TI)
BE VIVE~N 01T LAST OF WEEK
Board of Control to Consider Request
ef iiLsouri 'Vallcy Gra
For W _ .r am.
Michigan's 1912 football schedule
will probably be announced the latter
part of this week, as it has practically
been completed by Director Bartelie
of the Athletic Association, and needs
only the ratification CL the 2oard in
Control of Aihietics. The schedule
will go to the board for approval at a
meeting to be held Thursday.
At thE " same time, the board will un-
doubt dly consider the reo utions of
- the MioiAly-lni Associ-
tion which requwsts a 1912 Michig~an-
Nebraska game. As the schedule is
tentatively arranged, and undoubtedly
does not include a Nebraska contest.
it is doubtful if the bpard will author-
ize Diretor Barten to make over.
tures to the Cornhusker Institution.
SEMOIt Pi'TGS REQUIREI S .

Is

M.ehiganensi m ,qai. M that Copy be has been offe
iIudad in at Once. neering chair
There remai7 only six days n which 'annot be al
members of the graduating classes may Prof. Moyer
have their pictures taken for the Mich- truth.
iganensian at the rebat price of one When seen
dollar. Manating Editor Hover urg- was non-con
es that arrangements for sittings be plans for th
made at once to ta c advantage of Cooley, when
his price and also to insure the pic- said: "I know
tures being turned into the Michigan- it, if Prof.
ensian ofice early. handing in hi
The business staff of the Michigan- 1s news to me.
ensian also reports that the final date "I must re
set for the payment o organization about any run
dues is February 1. After this time relative to my
no organization copy will be published Prof. Moyer l
unless space is paid for. There is at deny that I a
present a large portion of copy of the action but, fu
more mportant o anizations still to' say nothing fo
be turned in, and the management of If ,Prof. AMo
the annual requests that socvn eties and will be the se
orgaizations submit this copy immedi- has lost to th
aIy. present schoc
- --Prof. Filibert
CORNELL NOW 4 AlT Oartment, ai
HIRE ON-PRAIUATE COACHES accopting a p
______ It is generall:
ITHACA, N. Y., January 24.-In or- ignation of the
der to allow the selection of other than tinct loss to M
Cornell alumn to each the Cornell Prof. Moyer
football team, the ornell athletic Harvard in 1
council has amended its rule covering came an instr
football coaching so as to give the From 1904 unt
football committee power to rec- with the Gen
ommend as coaches Cornell alumni, later entering
former under radulutes who lot the lighouse Con
football letter, and 'other coaches' years' service
It is understood that this means he came to M
that in future a Cornell football man ber of the mec
will be in charge of football coach- ulty.
ing, but that the Itbacans may have Prof. Moyer
;raduates of other colleges as foot- Plant Testing,
ball coaches if the committee sees fit. tv - othe lead

the co

Robbery Hero Becomes Policeman
uben Armbruster, the university1
watchman, who' immortalized
elf by scaring away the two safe-
:ers who attempted to run off
some university money last fall,
gone to new fields to seek for
Since the new year he has
wearing the "invisible blue" of'
Lnn Arbor police force.
ard Co.-p Does Big Business.
MBRIDGE, MASS., Jan. 24.-To-
sales amounting to $378,170.19
made by the Harvard "Co-Op"
during the year of 1910-11, ac-
ng to the recently issued. report.
is an amount practicaly equal to,
ombined sales at Yale, Princeton
ell, Missouri and California. Cor-
with about $100,000 of sales,comes
st to Harvard's record. The Har-
Co-Operative, with its branch
employs 20 more men than the'
)ned five others and has a mem-
up of 2,750.
presentative men of Harvard
and Princeton have gone on rec-
as favoring the graduate system
otball coaching in preference to

Prof.. B ell Enieri ms Graduate.
H. S. Sacked, '06, of Chicago, in
.harie of the branc_ of wood utiliza-
tion in the United States forest ser-
vice, was the guest last evening of
Prof. Filibert Roth of the forestry de-
partment.
KEE S (I' NATI N. L FIREST
- RE SE1RVE T'LD bY SI'EAKER.

-L ( VNl

ginE
the

0

"There are on the national forest t
reserves, sevcn~nd a half million
acres that must be reforested," said n
Fr'~l{ankW oil,' 12, in speakin1g be-
fore teFrsr lbls vnn
"The work of raising seedlings for this n
immense acreage is not the smallest b
part of the task." t]
Mr. Merrill spent part of the past t]
summer at the nursery of the Colum- r
bia national forest in Washington and
he gave his listeners a detailed account
of the 'work there, illustrating his
points with lantern slides. He also
showed slides illustrating rodern lum-
bering methods in the w~est. E. F. An- t.
derson addressed he club briefly on 'I
the subject of taking outdoor kodak t:
pictures.

f th
his
h'e c
ew

mester.
usying'
ion of
"ie man
e1ied hc

IR

with in

learned
gesident IHutcins to Talk at Goshen, characte
President H, B. Hutchins will deliver Arthur
a lecture at coshen College, Goshen, startlin:
Ind., on February 27, Te subject of live fles
the President's address will probably Belasco
be "Respect for the Law." producw

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan