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October 07, 1911 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1911-10-07

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Lj

The

ichigan

Daily

Read

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SUNDAY, OCTOBER 8, 1911.

't _,

iGame
i Ferry

yards. After getting the ball to Case's
2 yard line, only to be held, Michigan
worked back for a touchdown in
straight downs from the Case 30 yard
line, a forward pass, Craig to Wells,
aiding in the count with a 20 yard gain.
' Conklin goaled for a total of 12 points-
to close the half.
A fumbled punt in the third quarter
gave Case the ball onMichigan's 25
yard line, but Roby's drop-kick for a
threatened score traveled wild, and it
was Michigan's ball. Except for
Thomson's fine end run for a twenty
yard gain, the quarter ended feature-
less with the ball in Case's possession
on her own 38 yard line.
After Case had lost the ball to open'
the closing quarter on a poor pass,
Michigan proceeded to carry the leath-
er up the field on end runs and for-
ward passes, to Case's 3 yard line,
from which, place, Thomson went
across for the third big count. Conk-
-r lin kicked goal. Pontius brought the
ball back 25 yards on the next kick-
off and Michigan took the ball into
Case territory on a series of long
r gains. From Case's 24 yard line
a Thomson got away around right en4
for the fourth and final touch-down.
SConklin kicking goal. The game ended
1with the ball in Case's possession on

WOULD HAVE FRESH.
KNOW HIS POSITION
One of Upperclassmen Aroused
At Arrogance of First Year
Students

SAYS CLASS IS DISRESPECTFUL. TO SET TWO CONFISCATION DAYS.

NO CHANGES SLATED
IN. RULES FOB RUSH
Official Action Not to be Taken
Until Tuesday Evening by
Council

* YESTERDAY'S REULTS
: WEST
* Indiana, 6, Chicago, 23.
* S. Dak., o, Minnesota, 5.
* Lawrence, o, Wisconsin, 15.
Milliken, o, Illinois, 22.
* Monmouth, o, North'rn, 6.
* Wabash, 3, Pardue, o.
0. S. U., 3, Miami, o.
* West. Res., IT, Kenyon, o.
* EAST
* Penn., 9, Ursinus, o.
* Cornell, 15, Oberlin, 3.
' Yale, 12, Syracuse, o.
* *Harvard, 29, Holy Cross, o
* Princeton, 31, Villa Nova; o.
* Army, 12, Vermont, o.
* Navy, 17, Johns Hopkins, 5.
* Amherst, o, Wesleyan, o.
* Brown, 26, Mass. Agg., 6.
* Carlisle, 46, St. Marys, 5.
' Dartmouth, 122, Colby, o.
* Lafayette, ii, Swarthmore, 3.
A. A. H., Vo, Port fluron, o
*
PTIWIIER'M EORCHFSTRA WTTT,

*I

Y.M.C.A. P1
MAGNIFI
NEWi
Contemplated Stri
Cost More Than
and Will be a
Fireproof Buildi

Y OVER 3,500
Through and
er in

AA

,o ur- The line-up follows:
mon.g MICHIGAN.................CASE
strong Carrels ..........;L.E. .........Goss
little Conklin (Capt.) .L.T. ........Hyland
iarred Bogle........... L.G. .........Parsons
were Patterson........ C. ........Randall
t.gan Allmendinger,Quinn..........
higan..............R.G .........Weller
vident Pontius........R.T.........Boley
penal- Wells ...........R.E. ........Francy
id for Craig, Picard.... Q.....Roby (Capt.)
were Torbet, Herrington..........
back........L.H. ........Slater
tested Thomson......Full.......McAfee
lity to Huebel, Wenner, Roblee,.....
Out-........... R.H.........Kenyon
e crit- Officials - Referee, H o a g 1 a n d,
signal Princeton; Umpire-Flagler, North-
of the western; field judge-Yeekley, Penn
at ex- tate; head linesman-Edmunds, Mich-
.oblee, igan. Time of quarters-10 minutes.

(The Daily assumes no responsibility
for sentiments expressed in co-
muications.)
Editor Michigan Daily:
I presume that while I am writing
this communication, editorials and
sundry "admonitions" are going to
press condemning hazing ang the en-
couragement of rival class Spfrit. Let
me be clearly ,understood in what I
have to say. I am not out in defense
of arrogance and rowdyism, nor am I
enthusiastic for hazing of the "rough-
neck" type, but I do wish to say that
I consider that the spirit which pre-
vails among the men of the first year
class, especially this fall, to be noth-
ing short of insolence and disloyalty
to former traditions.
When the initial mass-meeting of
the year was in progress, Friday-hight,
a large body of "angel-eyed" freshmen
-about fifty in number-with defiance
spelled all (ver them, and as Kelly
said, "with 'hate-ur' in their style,"
ambled up with lofty tread and ,took
possession of a large portion of the
University Hall balcony. They were
not clever enough to behave them-
selves like gentlemen and try to boost
Michigan spirit properly. Nay, rather
these freshmen must need herald their
appearance with triumphant shouts
and great huzas of, "Fifteen, quite
some class, eh."
What do we hold mass-meetings for
nowadays. To show the public what
loyal spirit we have, or to display gen-
rally the valor of the Freshman class?
To me the latter seems more fitting.
It looks, indeed'as though we might
divide University Hall into sections
and let the valiant, "verdant" rooters
fight battles with air and forget all
about Michigan spirit and the team.
Why not? Was there a single upper-
classman ,.or alumnus that left Uni-
versity Hall the other evening who
did not ask himself the question?
What are we coming to, high schol'
serenades or infant congregations? '
For some time past there has been
considerable discussion and not a lit-
tle amusement over "slap on the
wrist" hazing, a title given to some of
the Sophomore efforts to chastise in-
solent freshmen. "Slap on the Wrist"
is good; so good in fact that it defines
the whole atmosphere which has
come to prevail in under-class circles.
Sophomores shudder for fear of the
"divine wrath" descending upon their
benevolent heads in case ,they forget
themselves and laugh, and Freshmen
stand by with a huge grin and an ob-
noxious pipe and say, "Haze us, if
you dare, though our wrists are ripe-
for slapping!"
Hauing of the old "blue-blood" type
is undoubtedly undesirable and out of
date but at the same time let us not.
come to a stage when green-horns
reign supreme and our Varsity takes
a back seat to academic spirit. But
perhaps it cannot be helped for the
reason that the day of the "molly-cod-
dle" has at last arrived.
Sincerely yours,
4N UPPER-CLASSMAN.

That this year's Fresh-Soph rush
will not differ materially from that of
last year is very probable from res-
ent indications. While no definite an-
nouncement can be made until after
the first meeting of the Student Coun-
cil next Tuesday evening it is evident
that faculty sentiment is opposed to
any return to the old night clashes
and it is almost certain that the ques-
tion of underclass supremacy will be
decided in broad daylight. Efforts
may be made, however, to make the
contest a one-pole affair.
Changes in the freshman rules will
also be considered at the next meeting
of the Council. Several new plans are
now under advisement and it is ex-
pected that the new rules will be more
exacting. Strqnuous measures will al-
so be adopted for their more rigid en-
forcement. The Council will also con-
sider the institution of two Confisca-
tion Days, one of which will proba-
bly occur in the near future, the other
to take place during the toqe season.
On these days it will be the privilege
of any student to confiscate anyhead
covering other than the official fresh-
man cap or toque found on a first year
man.
Last year confiscation day was held
in midwinter and proved to be an ef-
fetive factor in popularizing the
wearing of toques by the members of
all 'ciasses as well as freshmen.
Many complaints have been made of
freshmen wandering about the cam-
pus with heads unadorned by the "lit-
tle gray caps" and it is to impress
upon these the necessity of upholding
the university traditions that a Confis-
cation day will be held shortly.
Women to Outline Year's Athletics.
.A mass meeting will be held in Bar-
bour gym at 5 o'clock Monday for all
girls interested in athletics. Short
speeches by the officers of the
Woman's Athletic Association will
feature the program.
WILLIAM WASMUND WILL BE
BURIED MONDAY IN DETROIT.
The body of "Billy" Wasmund, the
former varsity quarterback, who died
recently from injuries received while
walking in his sleep, arrived in De-
troit yesterday morning. The funer-
al will .be held Monday .afternoon at
the family home. The members of
the Phi Epsilon fraternity, of which
Wasmund was a member, will act as
the guard of honor.
Ross Rode "Rods" to and 'from Oregon
After "blind baggaging" it to and
from Oregon, Fred Ross, '12, of varsi-
ty track fame, has just returned to
college.
Block Joins Detroit News Force.
Ralph Block, a prominent member
of the 1911 literary class, has recent-
ly accepted a position with the Detroit
News.
The freshmen defeated the sopho-
mores in the annual rush at Oberlin
this year.

Construction is not to
During the .Prese
College Year.
Plans have been drawn
erection of a mammoth new
Y. M. C. A. building, to be

WILL BE

i. i jx lJ

FEATURE SPECIAL DINNERS. the corner of Sta

A special Sunday evening dinner,
to continue throughout the year, will
be served at the Michigan Union be-
tween six and seven o'clock. "Ike"
Fischer's orchestra will furnish mus-
sic on each occasion, The menu is as
follows;
Canape de Fois Gras.
Chicken Gumbo, Louisiana.
Celery. Queen Olives.

Fillet of Lake Trout, Dugbrie.

FINI

Roast Prime Rib Beef, Natural
Roast Young Goose, Stuffed,
Sauce.

Gravy.
Apple

cep- ALLERDICE MAY COACH AT TEXAS
hos-
all Former Michigan Captain Slated to©
was Succeed "Billy" Wasmund.
ened According to advices from Indian-
and apolis, the home of "Dave" Allerdice,
way, the former Michigan captain will ac-
half cept the position of football coach at
Pic- the University of Texas made vacant
d of by the death of "Billy" Wasmund. The
ange University of Texas wired Yost to
right send another coach to take Wasmund's
e of place and Yost immediately notified'
\ Allerdice. Allerdice has been coach-
cling ing the Butler, Ind., college eleven but
2:10 is not tied down by a contract. If the
the terms of the University of Texas are
ap- right he will probably accept the posi-
fter. tion.-

* at r
plac
ecirc
id at
ctors,
in its
on a
Craig
s rec
and

Chateau Potatoes. Green Pear
Sweet Potatoes, New Orleans.
Peach Ice Cream and Cake.
Dea Tasse.
Sunday, October 8, 1911.
Vulcans and Triangles Change Rooms.
The Vulcan and Triangle engineer-
ing societies moved into their new
quarters yesterday on south Universi-
ty Ave., across from Trojanowski's
barber shop.
"JOHNNY" FISCHER WILL NOT
BE IN COLLEGE THIS YEAR.;
"Johnny" .Fischer, '13, catcher on
the 1911 baseball team, will not be in
school this year. Because of a mis-
take in his entrance credit he was not
admitted to the lit-medic course and
consequetly changed his plans.Fisch-
er was a member of Sphinx society.
FRESHMEN HOLD SCRIMMAGE
WITHOUT SCORE BEING MADE.
Two teams of All-Fresh candidates
battled for 45 minutes Saturday morn-
ing without .a score being made by
either side. No first team has yet
been picked though Coach Cole is
watching the work of the men he has
placed on his two elevens closely. The'
coach wants all candidates out at 3:30
Monday afternoon, and has suggested
a thorough perusal of this year's rul-
es before that time.
"S. and R." is Gloved Under New Head
The "S. and R." course of the engi-
neering department has been reehris-
'tened "Engineering Mechanics." One
hour has been dropped off and sever-
al tempting features added to help'
popularize the former bugbear of the
boilermakers.

streets, about one block fr
campus. The structure, who
pleted, will be the finest stude
ciation building in the coup
plans calling fob, an expend
$200,000 to $300,000. A portio
site has already been purchas
options on the remainder ar
'hands of the Association.
"No, we won't be compelle
main in the present cramped
so very much longer," said S
Carl Smith in an interview y
"The proposed new Y. M. C
be an institution of which :
men may well be proud. It
tain dormitories for 75 to :
offices, reading rooms, and
allies. Shower baths and plu
be included in the equipment.
banquet hall will fill a long-
of the association."
The structure contemplated
175 x 108 feet and four s1
height. The construction w
brick and stone, rendering th
ing absolutely fire-proof.
Otis and Clark of Chicago
architects, Mr. Otis of this fi:
a graduate of Michigan.
Secretary Smith was unable
the exact time at which wor
new structure will be comme
it is known that construction
be begun during the presen
year.
Webster Society Admits Ten
Ten new men were voted i
ster debating society Friday
OOfficers will be elected a
members initiated next Frida:
STUDENT COUNCIL WILL;.
FIRST TIME TUESDAI
The first meeting of the
Council will. be held on Tue
ening, October 10, at 7 o'cloclk
D, of the law building. All
men are urged to be presen'
iness of importance will be tr
Collision Delays Faculty 1
Among the passengers ab
Olympic when the liner cc
Southampton Waters three w
were M. Rene Talamon, inst
French in the university a
R. Thurner, late of Bryn Ma
has a professorship in histo
university this year. loth
pected to arrive any day and
up work immediately with th
es according to catalogue.

re-
over-
with

wn the Case
touch-down
watch had
)nklin kick-
V character-
nd the first
11 in Case's
ne 43 yard

NUMBER OF CUPID'S ARROWS
STRUCK TRUE THIS SUMMER.
Dan dupid was busy this summer
with Michigan graduates and under-
graduates and three couples are
known to be his victims. Waldo Ab-
bott, '11-'13, and Emily Ely of Ruth-
erford, N. J., were married in August
at the home of the bride. Samuel Pat-
ten, '13 E, and Opal Trott, '12, were
married at Saginaw, Mich., last week.
The engagement of Freida Klein-
stuck, '09-'11 L, and Karl Blanken-
burg, '10 .L, was announced in July
and the marriage will occur in Novem-
ber.
There are many more suspects, but,
as yet, no confirmed statements can
be issued.

rward pass netted 18
> open the second ees-
me the Scientists se-
i in the entire game.
was speedily lost on
v moments later Craig
)wd to its feet in a
"ound left end for 20

I,

President Hutchins
Will Give His

Tonight
6:30

ANNUAL ADDRESS TO NEW MEN

Newberry Hal.

You are Welcome

- U

f

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