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November 12, 1911 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1911-11-12

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

The,

I

Michigan

Daii

AReliable Directory of
x Reliable Business

I

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SUNDAY, NOVEI 13ER 12, 1911.

No.

Falls Before
iacans'Onslau ght

"BOTTLES" THOMSON.

tureid by
d, Results
tting Lea-
gan Line;
RES PLAY.
ws .Stellar,

:, I

** * * * * * * * *
SATURDAY'S FOOTBALL liE-
SULTS.
-0--
(By Detroit News Service.)
luEast.
-0-
Yale 15, Brown 0.
Carlisle 18, Harvard 15.
Princeton 3, Dartmouth 0.
Pennsy 23, Lafayette 6.
Army 20, Bucknell 2.
Penn State 17, Colgate 0.
Williams 6, Wesleyan 5.
Swarthmore 9, Lehigh 0.
Z1est
-0-
Illinois 0, Indiana 0.
Iowa 11, Purdue 0.
Chicago 9, Northwestern 3.
Marquette 6, S. D. State 0.
South
-o--.a
Vanderbilt 23, Kentucky State 0.
* * * * * * * * * *

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PRES. IUTCHiNS WILL 0 "NO MORE IIANG R1" QUOT
TO ILLINOIS T()31R110W. A LPIA AN I O3IE(GA IFA) N1NW
President Ilutchins returned yester- "In the days of old,
day morning from his trip to New York "When the knights were cold,"
city where he attended the inaugura- "or something like that," our fair sis-
tion of Elmer E. Brown, '89, as Chan- ters were wont to cloister themselves
cellor of New York University. He will up from the joys of the world to do
leave town again tomorrow night for pennance for the sins of themselves
Champaign, Illinois, to attend a meet- and humanity. And now to the sanc-
ing of the Michigan alumni of that vi- tum comes .the word that two of our
cinity. The University of Illinois is college sisterhoods, blest be their
located at Champaign, and a large names which we'll call Alpha and
number of its faculty are alumni of Omega because they aren't, have sworn
this university. The president will be a mighty oath to forego the pleas-
entertained at abanquet, at which he ures of the dance at one house of
will deliver a talk dealing with the mirth, not a thousand miles away. For
growth and needs of this university. what, oh for what, are. they doing pen-
nance? The cubs been out and could
TWO0('LASSES SIGN UP FOl only smell a rat. No one can tell cx-
SERI"ES OF UNION )lINNERS actly how either Alpha or Omega has
sinned; their repentance only is sure. |
Two classes have already accepted Rumor has it that Alpha and Omega
the plan offered by the Michigan Union fear said house of mirth has not the
of giving a series of class diAners proper pale of saintliness for their fair
throughout the year at cost. The sen- presence. I' faith, now watch that
ior engineers and the junior lits have place of joy wither and pale without
taken action formally on the matter their favor; -under their prayers and
and arranged their dates. The plan is absence; must gain the colorless palor
to give a series of five dinners for $2. of approaching eancity..
Tickets will only be sold for the whole The aforesaid cub has asked that a
series and not for single dinners. public requiem be sung for the hopes
of the poor fellow who no- longer hast
a place to take an Alpha or Omega,
C. RUNS FOR witha greater one for the lad who
swears he can't take the best girl in
SBERTHS T MR RW the world to a place where 0-e of those
A'.A's or 'sNout go. And he gives
thanks for the little girl for whose
"commonness" Alpha an , Omega are
Personnel of Team to Co East doing pennance.I

E , ,
J ' 3INelson Reveals in Artic
in "Alumnus" Statistics Th
Show Why Engineers Leai
the Department Before Grac
W(K 1T0 I6FItiLT FOR \.N
ii -. re. liman K 111 d be Made
ENOtw Signiiicice of
Professioj.

hews.)
.-A blocked

ae

of Cor-
scored
O'Con-
Lrd line,
rd and
I mark.
Cornell

FRESH LAW CLASS
ELECTS OFFICERS;

o*a

game and
ly a kick-
md O'Con-
e to gain
tball, and

Michigain's candidate for All-American
fullback played his usual hard
steady game against Cornell.
spectacular, played his usual hard
steady game. He was Michigan's most
consistent ground gainer and was
worked hard. He was called on often,
either to carry the ball or to kick.
The summary follows:
Richigan (0) Position Cornell (6)
Conklin (Capt)......L.E. ...... Eyrich
Quinn.............L.T. ..Munk(Capt)
Kaynor.......... L.G. .... O'Rourke
Paterson........C. ......J. Whyte
Garrells..........R.G. ...... Munns
Bogle.......R.. .T. Champaign.
Pontius,Torbet. R.E.Fritz
Picard Q.... Butler
Carpell..........L.H..O'Connor
Thomson..........F.B.....Underhill
Wells...........R.H R. Whyte

es

Presidencv Undecided Because
Candidate Fails to Get
Majority Vote
REMAINING OFFICERS SEL ECTED.
In the race for president of the fresh
law class yesterday, G. L. Buck receiv-
ed 68 ,votes, and T. F. McCoy, 34. Ac-
cording to the new ruling of the Stu-
dent Council which was adopted by
this class a new election will be nec-
essary, Buck having failed to receive
a majority of the 189 votes cast. The
election will be held again next Friday
from 4-6 in room B. of the law build-
ing.
The other election results follow:
vice-president, John R. Callahan; sec-
retary, Nat J. Gould; treasurer, J. B.
Meyers; 'sergeant-at-arms, D. W. Mil-
ler; oratorical delegate, J.8 E. Staley;
football manager, G. S. Johnson; base-
ball manager, R. C. McLaughlin; bas-
ketball manager, N .W. Jones; track
manager, Edward 0. West.
Gillies to Speak Tonight.
Rev. Andrew. Gillies of Minneapolis
will deliver a lecture on the question
"What is Christianity?" at the Meth-
odist church tonight at 7:30. The lec-
ture is one of the course given under
the auspices of the Wesleyan Guild.
Special Venire to See York Property.
A special venire to look over the
York property on South Thay r St.
was ordered to be dpawn by Judge
Kinney Friday in connection with the
condemnation proceedings 'of the uni-
versity for the erection of the new{
Arthur Hill Memorial hall. The trial
is expected to come up in a short time.

Will be Picked From First
to Finish in Final
CORNELL TO BE FEARED ENEMY.
Leaving Waterman gym tomorrow;
afternoon at 4 p. m., the cross country
squad which will represent Michigan
at the inter-collegiate meet at Brook-
line, Mass., will run the old course out
Washtenaw, past the Poor Farm and
back to Packard. The course which is
comparatively level, is one half mile
longer than the Brookline course.
Haimbaugh, Beardsley, Willits and
Crossman are expected to show up ev-
en better than last year, while of the
new men, Young, Smith and Wagner
look promising. The first two novices'
to finish will be given their C. , C.'s
as has been the usual custom.
Michigan cross country runners
probably will find their chief opponents
or cross country honors this year to be
Cornell. Cornell met and defeated the
University of Pennsylvania by the
score of 43 to 21. Such men as Berna,
the two mile champion, and Jones the
American mile record holder, ran for
Cornell and finished first and second
respectively.
Prof. Goddard is in Minneapolis.
Prof. E. C. Goddard, secretary of the
law department, left for Minneapolis
Friday on a business trip. He will re-
turn Tuesday.
The Markham Pottery has placed at
the Foster Art Store a fine collection
of their pottery which will be on sale]
for a few days at reduced prices.
* 36-38-40.

-fnti

Iist! The wireless editor, lean and
veined finges on his instruments, de-
ciphers the dot-dash buzz, "They still
go to the Maj!"

c

game. Touchdown, Fritz; goal from touch-
ed so down, Butler. Officials, Fultz, -Brown,
, and referee; Sharpe, Yale, umpire; Hinkey,
e the Yale, field judge; Booth, Princeton,
rders headslinesman.

,av
o
-e.

Tor-

a con-I

* Hold-
.e chief
h teams
d back.
he first
heavily
.11 from
:ell's 30
recalled
rds for

PLANS STARTED AT COLUMBIA
FOR SCHOOL OF JOURNALISM
ENDOWED BY MR. PULITZER,
NEW'YORK, Nov. 10.-Plans for a
school of journalism made possible by
the endowment left by the late Joseph
Pulitzer, are being considered by the
regents of Columbia University. Among
the members of -the advisory committee,
which was ,appointed by Mr. Pulit-
zer himself, are Whitelaw Reid,
Samuel Bowles, editor of the Spring-
field "Republican," Gen Charles H.
Taylor, and the principal editors of the
Pulitzer papers.
Present Drama at Newberry Hall.
A missionary drama was presented
at Newberry Hall last night. The
drama was written by students and
the purpose was to give an idea of the
requirements of a missionary. This is
the first of a series of five to be given
by the S. C. A. and they are open to1
all students of the university.

1)ean Reed Again 'ni His Des-
the last week as ai result of overwork l_
is much improved, and expects to e
in his office Moiday, at least during
the regular office hour. He was at his
desk for a short time yesterday.
Union Entertas 'iToday.
Graphophone music will constitute
the regular Sunday afternon program
at the Union today. Popular records
,will be played from 3 to 6 c'clock. Ci-
der and tobacco will be served for re-
freshenents.
UNIVERSITY ,RAIDS MA.RRIEDI
JN KAL AMAZOo YESTEI)R DAY
A number of people were in K ala-
mazoo yesterday to attend the wedling
of Miss Freida Kleinstuck and Mr. Carl
Blankenburg. Both young people grad-
uated recently from the university. Mr.
Blankenburg received his degree fcenm
the law department in 1909. iiss
l-leinstuck graduated from the law de-
partment last June having received a
ilterary degree in -1.;?ii. While in the
rntversity Miss Kilistuck was a
prominent figure in the Women's
league and other activities.. She served
as women's editor of the Daily in 1907*
1910.
Mr. and Mrs. Blankenburg will make
tbeir home in Kalamazoo, where Mr.
Plankenburg has 'taken up the prac-
tice of law.
Alumnae Assembled Yesterday.
The Collegiate Alumnae association
of the University of Michigan met yes-
terday afternoon at 2:30 at the home of
Mrs: F. N. Scott. The program con-
sisted of a report read by Mrs'.
W. D. Henderson on the meeting of
the National Convention of Collegiate
Alumnae associations held in New
York City from October 23 to 28 in-
clusive.}

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An analysis of the conditions. ti
cause students to leave the enginec
ing dpa rtment before graduation
the subject of an article by J. Ralei
Nelson entitled, "The Student W
J)oes Not Come Back" which will a
pear in the next issue of the Michig;
Alumnus. At the close of last ye
he engineering faculty appointed
connnittee to investigate the proble
of stue who c-e and go perio
cally. The committee found that .o
of a total enrollment of 1335 in 1909-1
thcre were 385, exclusive of those wl
vraduated, who did not return in t
'all of 1909. Dean Cooley sent lette
to two hundred and sixty of them a
)ne hundred and twenty-ive repli
vere receixed.
The reasons for departures, in ge:
nral, can be classiield as follows: mi
ellaneous, 13; ill health, 19; dissati
action with the department, 8; chan<
f institution, 9; change of course
department, 19; desire for practic
~xperience, 21; and lack of funds, 3
The Ielatively small number of le
ers which contained any adverse ri
cisiM and the arge number that ga
ack of funds as the cause for absen<
s especially notable.
It seems to me that the greater p<
ent of the instructors take it f
~ran ted thiat the ordinary stude>
nows more than he really does-abol
ertain questions. As a consequent
xplanations are not made as elemen
.ry and simple as they c uld be," sa3
n e of the fo rmer stu dents.
Some contended that they entere
he engineering department for tI
eason that some of their friends ha
ntered ahead of them and therefoi
'oncluded that the proper thing f<
hem to do was to become an enginee
in finding that department too hai
hey entered the literary department
3e writer goEs into an extensrive a(
ount of the faults of the departmel
and says:
"It should be a part of the work C
he departmlent, in the first place, 1
-ducate parents and secondary teacl
rs and even the boys themselves i
heir last years of high school as wh
he engineering profession means, s
hat fewer young men will blunder ii
o the engineering profession who
hey should go elsewhere. By a moi
ympathetic appreciation of the pei
onal problems of the students, by
more unted effort to emphasize ti
l° vlueo f things, and to help ti
tC1i d theirtplaacs and t he stc
he department should be able to Ito]
mor of the students or, at least,
hey are leOst the department shoul
eel that it is as it should be, but unl
is able to offer something more sul
tantial than advice, until it gives 1
he worthy'student, who shows pron
sc, the financial assistance he mui
ave to continue his studies, a wasi
must be expected every year."

, kicker, fail-
the end of the
r a field goal
55 yard line,
O'Connor al-
in at the end
ne was called
take the kick.
gan's 23 yard
t for the goal
York was not

II~rcsbgterian Cbuvch

Pastor, Leonard A. Barrett

Student Pastor, J. Leslie French

Io:3o A. M., sermon, "Zachariah's Vision''
7:30, P. MN., Address, " Friendship"

_ _
9

Co.Ai

Perhaps you have never heard the trial of Jesus discussed countless times, probably you have heard its legal
features gone over but, if you have, and yet have never heard Prof. Knowlton and haven t spent years in the
studyof the subject after you became a successful lawyer, it might be worth a Sunday evening hour to hear

"The Trial of Jesus from a Lawyer's tan
Outlined by Professor Knowlton, in Newberry Hall, tonight

a

SUNDAY, NOV.

l2

AT 6:30 O'CLOCK

4

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