100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

November 02, 1911 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1911-11-02

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Cie

ichgan

Daily

A Reliable Directory
Reliable Bu

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 2, 1911.

New Auditorium Which Will

Soon be Erected by University

Old

Out

HILL MEMORIAL HALL.
Imposing structure, designed by Albert Kahnof Detroit, will soon surplan' ersity Hall for campus gatherings. °

An imposing structure of handsome rector's room, and rooms for storing

and
the

GIRLS ARE CAUSE
OF POOR ROOTING

Writer Thinks "Fussers"
Should NotTake "Lady-
r Loves" to Games
e l
- (Tho Daily assumes no responsibility
1. for sentiments expressed in com-n
- munications.)
t Editor, The Michigan Daily: -
It was not so many years ago that
the campus looked upon "fussing" as
A a disease. It was thought quite harm-
r less and consequently few paid any at-
tention to it. Within the last six years,
n however, I have noticed a very re-
f markable thange. It is no longer a
- disease, it has become an institution.
e I do not desire to pass upon its merits
e nor'do I desire to condemn it entirely.
It 'has many good points but it also
has many poor ones. These I wish to
y talk about.
n Like everything else it has its place
d and, frankly, this. is not at football
s games. The girls are ruining our
cheering, in so far as they drag faith-
t- ful but weak rooters from the north to
r- the south stand. We like the girls
i- and we like to see them in the south
n stand, where we can gaze at the riot
e of brilliant and startling colors and
is where they can listen to our rooting.
r, But, when they take with them some
g of the rooters, depleting the cheering
)f section, then we think they are over-
x- stepping their right and proper lim-
f- its.

modern design, with/a facade 17 feet
wide, richly decorated with a row of
columns, and bronze tile ornaments-
such will be Michigan's new auditori-
um when the architect's drawings,
now in possession of Secretary Smith
of the University, are realized. Four
huge columns 26 feet high support the
architrave across which is inscribed
"Hill Memorial Hall," in memory of
Arthur Hill whose gift of $200,000
made the edifice possible.
Leading up to the five doors, which
alternate with the columns, is a short
flight of steps. The doprs open upon
a lobby which extends across the
building. and from which leather-cov-
ered doors lead to the foyer.
The parquet is 86 feet long. The
ceiling of the main auditorium is a se-
ries of arches, beginning with that
above the pipe organ and extending
nearly to the back wall. The proscen-
ium arch is 74 feet wide where it
touches the stage. The plan of the
auditorium proper was supervised by
Hugh Tallant, acoustics engineer, 'of
New York City,
The stage is 29 feet deep. It is flank-
ed by four artist's rooms, besides a di-

scenery, etc. Up in the flies are rooms
for choristers, the organ box, and L,
tuning room.
On the balcony floor are retiring
rooms, and a lecture room extending
along the front of the building. The.
balcony is itself 42 feet deep, and the
second balcony, or gallery, fifty feet.
The auditorium will be heated by a
system of fans blowing hot air into]
what are called plenum chambers, un-
der the floors. Suction fans in the
ceiling complete the ventilation. There
will be' automatic heat regulation.
It is planned to make the building
fireproof. The floors and walls will
be constructed of reinforced concrete,
and also the roofs and stairways. The
general scheme of construction con-
sists of steel columns supporting gird-
ers and trusses, of the same material,
for the roof and balconies.
At present, the bids for the build-
ing are under consideration of the Fi-
nance and the Buildings and Grounds
committees of the Board of Regents.
When they have decided which offer is
the most advantageous, President
Hutchins and Secretary Smith will
make the contract.

LABOR LEADER TO
"ndustrial Accidents" to be
Subject of Mitchell's Talk
Before S. L, A
SPEAKER IS SELF MADE MAN .
John Mitchell, the great labor lead-
er and vice-president of the Ameri-
can Federation of Labor, will speak
tonight on "Industrial Accidents" un-
der the auspices of the S. L. A. in Uni-
versity Hall at 8 o'clock.
Mr. Mitchell is a comparatively
young man,' being scarcely over 40
years of age. Although his early edu-
cation was neglected, he studied at
night and has become a master of the
English language. He started work-
ing at the age of fourteen in an Illinois
mine, but gradually advanced until he
became president of the United Mine
Workers of America. Today he is con-

TAG DAY SE
ONLY SOLU
TO QUE
Campus Sentiment Fa
ing Money by Su
to Send Band East;
Mass-Meeting Fee
t1USICIANS WANT CORN
Prefer Going to Ithaa ii
Secured for Any 'T
This Year.
Judging from the pre'
tions a tag day campaign 1V
to raise funds to send the b
nell.
Not only, the athletic
but general student sent
in fact, the members of the
selves are opposed to char
mission fee to the mass m
this purpose.
At the meeting of the d
the band last night it was
choose the trip to the Co
In preference to going to
This will necessitate the h
tag day, if it is instituted, a
Council May Ac
A special meeting of th
Council will probably be ca
to take action on the matte
prominent campus organiz
already promised to coo
the band in case the Coun
a favorable decision.
"We believe, not only fr
cess of the Tag day last ye
from thegeneral sentim
student body, that .a tag :c
what is wanted and t'hat it
ported," said Band Master
ley last evening. '"The bar
favor of commercializing
meetings for its sake."
Several upperclassmen
themselves as .favoring ,a t
"Certainly let's have a tai
"Hap" Haskins. "This 'be
is all bosh. There could
thing worse than charging
to a mass meeting."
"Bring me the first tag
sale," said "Morrie" Myers,
try to sell me a ticket to
meeting."
NARROWLY ESCAPES
*
Student Cut About Throat
sion in Chemistry Labi
Alan Honey, a fresh en
severely cut by flying glas
plosion at the general lal
the chemistry building ye
ternoon. Several fragment
tie entered his neck narro
his throat.
Honey ws generating
when the bottle, which he
accidentally came in conta
flame of a Bunsen burner t
plosion resulted. Several
near him received scratch
ing glass.
Honey's wounds . were
the Homeopathic hospital
probably be able to attend
day.
WATCH FOR THE
SPORTING EXTRA AF'
PENNSY GAME.

PENN COACHES UP IN AIR;
MUST START AT BEGINNING.
Quakers are Demoralized by I)efeat
At Hands of Penn
State College.
PHILADELPHIA, PA., Nov. 1.-
Pennsylvania's beating at the hands of
State College last Saturday has put
the Penn coaches up in the air. The
eleven tackled poorly and showed a
lack of knowledge of the fundamen-
,tals of the game. In addition, several
of the substitutes, when sent in, play-
ed better than the regulars. It is now

HAS NO SYMPAThY FOR MEN
WIIO MIX IN CAMPUS DOINGS.
Dean Bates Also Frowns on Petty
Class Polities in Address
to Juniors.
"No sympathy should be shown
those students that participate in col-
legiate activities while those that are
working their way through school
should be aided and advised at all tim-
es," declared Dean Henry M. Bates, of
the law department in an address to
the junior laws yesterday afternoon.
The general use of political methods

sed and
scarce
to take
ias to.
s after-
e coach
show in
ing.

'
F" 1
:'': ° a
, ,
;, ,,';
" ' ,
;,

We need better cheerjng.. The root- necessary for the coaches to make'in class elections was also decried by
ers have degenerated, compared to the practically a new start not only in the dean.
bunch that "Spid" Coe and others us- the fundamentals of the game but in "It is the height of the ridiculous
ed to lead. There are not enough of choosing the eleven, and the team that for a man, who should be studying, to
them. Too.many seek the south stand meets the Indians next Saturday will go around pulling wires to secure a
where they can sit with some repre- have several new names on it. petty nomination. I earnestly hope
sentative of the fair sex and pick flaws The State game brought out one that this will be done away with in fu-
in the cheering of their fellow stu- man especially, Minds, a brother of ture elections," he said.
dents on the opposite side, whose Pennsylvania's famous captain of ten Dean Bates also spoke regarding
sense of loyalty to their university years ago. He was the one who stem- the changes in the curriculum, con-
and its institutions has not been dull- med the tide of defeat, got the back- duct of students, and the time that
ed. field working together and finally by should be required to prepare the
We do not want you to stag it to Gran- a brilliant run scored Penn's only lessons.
Let's get back to the good old times. touchdown. It was the only touch-
ger's or stay at home on Sunday ev- down of the day that was obtained by DON'T DELAY THAT SUBSCRIPF
enings, or cut out moonlight strolls on consistent gains through the line and TPION ANY LONGER..
the Boulevard, or evening rides to around the ends. All, three of State's
(Continued on Page 4.) scores were made by brilliant indi- ..LEAVE A! WANT AD FOR THAT
vidual runs, aided by good interfer- LOST OR FOUND ARTICLE AT THE
SUBSCRIBE NOW. PAY LATER. 3nce and a slight element of luck. DAILY OFFICE OR AT QUARRY'S.
-.

John Mitchell.
sidered to stand paramount to any
man who represents those who toil.
Detective William J. Burns, when he
was here Monday, declared that he re-
gards John Mitchell as the greatest la-
bor leader in the country and as a
forceful speaker. Wherever Mr.
Mitchell has spoken he has created
a .favorable impression and has done
much to forward the cause of trade
(Continued on page 4.)

h quarter, whose
he Adrian game,
e University hos-
e to attend class-
E A BETTER
K A COMPLETE
CHIGAN DAILY

I

x
t

DON'T SPONGE YOUR
FROM YOUR NEIGHBOR.
SCRIBE.

DAILY
SUB-

I 'I

eat all interested
bor Problems you
iot afford to miss
great authority.

JOH

ITCHELL

8111gl admission tuik(
can be secured at B
Oice, etof U. I,
after 7:30. Price. 5

Labor Leader and Orator
"Industrial Accidents"

Tonight 8:15

Don't Miss 'It

.:... 1

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan