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August 08, 2013 - Image 6

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Publication:
Michigan Daily Summer Weekly, 2013-08-08
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6

Thursday, August 8, 2013
The Michigan Daily - michigandaily.com

CSG
From Page 3
Mays said while he did not
dispute Proppe's executive powers
to establish new commissions, he
believed that convening available
assembly members to discuss
commission matters would have
been appropriate given the history

between the two parties.
However, recent developments
have proven the executive commis-
sions to be open to Senate Assembly
input. Through a new provision that
allows students to pitch ideas for the
creation of new commissions, Mays
will be working with Proppe to
establish a commission that would
encourage more University interac-
tion with the Detroit area.

Wednesday, the Executive
Board opened up applications for
Commission Chair positions.
Mays said forUM would work
with the board to nominate suitable
candidates for the positions.
"We're going to have an open,
positive dialogue about this," Mays
said. "That's what forUM's all about
and that's what we've always want-
ed to do - have transparency in gov-

ernment."
Moving forward, Proppe said
meetings will need to be held to
determine whether last year will
be considered a valid year for the
expired commissions.
"We'll work to correct and move
forward," Proppe said. "We can't
change what happened (last year)
but I'm really happy to work with
the Commission chairs."

PRIMARY
From Page 2

RELEASE DATE- Thursday, August 8, 2013
Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle'
Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Nichols Lewis
ACROSS DOWN 33Violist's clef 51 Macmessaging
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rcrd 1410- opnr 36 Cmeatng 53 Early brunch hr.
RBIlseasons 2 Places to find 38"Sure, go ahead!" 54 Busybdy
5 Dancer's rail forks 40 Fan lubtfous 55 Trivia champ's
14 F ke u 3Dvid and Ricky's 43Brigham Young's tidbit
14Numbskull dad gp. 56Itlneed of
15 "Love Story" 4 By the _: in 45 Auto leasing liniment
1 t quant ity r choice 58 Roulette bet
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20 Parting that's bid _ Edge"
21 Childlike sci-fi 9 Popeye creator ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE:
race Segar _.
22 Abr.before a 10 Onesignoring A F T A B A S I J A W S
date limits BLAB ANT IC ARAP
23 Remitted 11 *Tantrums B E L L Y LAUGH V A L E
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35 Preparefor a bout 24 Dressedfor B A S K T E P I 0 A S H E
36 Cereal usually dreamland, C A L O T B O E E L
sered hol s 2biely H I T E H O U S E S T A F F
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fare 28 "You _ H O V D I M S A H I
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disapproval, and Cocker hit L E O I H A L F C A R A F E
a hinttothe starts 30 Threaded E L U L E R I S A A N O N
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41 Bowl uver 32Abdictor o 1917 xnrrdsdltOr@aol.om 0818213
42Snorkeling spots 1 2 3 4 s 7 8 9 10 11 12 13
44 Boozehounds
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68P mede:
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69 Tax cheat chaser,
briefly By Nancy Salomon0 M
(c)2013Tribune Content Agency, LLC

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Devarti plans to run as an
independent for Ward 3 in
November's election while
Eaton is expected to face no
competition for Ward 4.
Relatively consistent with
primary elections, Tuesday
saw a low voter turnout of only
8.16 percent. Only four voters
- or 0.26 percent of the ward's
registered voters - cast ballots
for Ward 4-1, whose polling
place was located inside the
Michigan Union. At the other
end of the spectrum, Ward 3
boasted a 20.09 percent turnout.
Managing News Editor
Aaron Guggenheim contributed
reporting.
THIS
IS OUR
LAST
ISSUE!.
DON'T MISS US
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STAY UPDATED
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PICK UP AN
ISSUE BRIGHT
AND EARLY
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CTE
From Page 1
While much of the regents'
July decision addresses policy
previously unaddressed by
University guidelines, the
University has provided in-state
tuition rates to undocumented
students on a case-by-case basis
for at least the past two years.
The University granted in-state
tuition to 80 percent of about
2,000 applications for resident
classification during each of the
past two years.
Though the admissions process
will remain unchanged, Fitzgerald
said the University must ensure
undocumented students are aware
of recent policy changes.
"For quite some time, (the
issue of tuition equality) was a
clear focus and now we're simply
focused on implementing this poli-
cy that we think is really important
to the University," Fitzgerald said.
Morales said CTE plans to keep
pressing for increased access for
undocumented students. Hoping
the group and administrators
can convene another task force,
akin to the one that successfully
explored tuition equality policy.
CTE probably will not resort to
protests this time around, though
they will retain a continued
presence at regents' meetings.
Financial aid forundocumented
students is the next big issue
the University must address.
The average income of an
undocumented family is $27,000,
roughly the same cost of in-state
tuition at the University.
Currently, undocumented stu-
dents are ineligible for federal and
state-funded student aid. Morales
said CTE wants to encourage the

creation of a scholarship fund for
which undocumented students
would be eligible, potentially part
of the University's upcoming capi-
tal campaign.
"Are they going to treat
them equally or will there be
discrimination in that process?"
he said. "CTE wants to hold firm
and work with the administration
(to ensure) they hold to the pledge
for all students."
In light of a decision largely
influenced by student organizing,
Morales said the regents' new
policy has also energized student
movements across the state,
specifically those devoted to
tuition equality reforms.
He said CTE plans to work
with organizations already on
the ground at nearby institutions
such as Wayne State University,
Eastern Michigan University and
Michigan State University.
Though the decision has
provided significant traction to
the movement, tuition equality
still faces its share of critics.
Last month, University Alum
and CTE founder Kevin Mersol-
Barg appeared on Fox 2 Detroit to
discuss the University's new pol-
icy opposite Wayne State student
and Michigan College Republi-
cans chairman Michael Stroud,
who railed against the changes.
In an interview with The
Michigan Daily last month,
Rep. Jeff Irwin (D - Ann Arbor)
expressed concern over a
potential judicial challenge to the
University's policy. Irwin said he
would continue fighting to write
tuition equality into state law with
legislation he proposed in April.
For CTE, the campaign contin-
ues; for University administrators,
the implementation of a new poli-
cy is just beginning.

Can increase patient
ability to handle lethal
doses of radiation
By KAITLIN ZURDOSKY
Daily StaffReporter
University research has recently
proven that cancer patients may be
able to withstand potentially lethal
does of radiation treatment.
Chemotherapy is a standard
treatment administered to a patient
to destroy cancer cells. However,
high doses become dangerous
when the drug, which often fails
to discriminate between cancerous
and healthy cells, causes irrevers-
ible damage to healthy cells.
Associate Dentistry Prof. Dr.
Jian-Guo Geng and his team have
pinpointed the gastrointestinal
tractn as anotentia luin 'to n

damaging doses of chemotherapy.
Their study, recently published in
the scientific journal Nature, shows
that if the gastrointestinal tract
is protected, it is able to nourish
tissues in the body to increase
the potential of healthy tissue
survivingthe radiation treatment.
"If you have more intestinal stem
cells, you will be able to repair the
damages caused by chemotherapy,"
Geng said.
Geng and his colleagues,
discovered that when a specific
protein, Robol, binds with the
molecule Slit2 on intestinal stem
cells, this mechanism boosts cells'
healing effect.
By adding extra stem cells in
the gastrointestinal tract, healthy
tissues could be shielded from
the radiation without decreasing
tumor sensitivity to chemotherapy.
While a natural amount of
intestinal stem cells heal damaged
or--ans and t+ssue.,- the aditinn

Thursday, August 8, 2013
The Michigan Daily - michigandaily.com 17
Gastroin1testinal tract
may aid chemotherapy

of extra stem cells enhances the
protection of the intestine. The
"normal" amounts of stem cells
cannot guard the body from
damage done by chemotherapy.
When the application of the
additional stem cells was tested
on mice, results showed overall
lessened gut impairment and lower
fatality. About 70 percent of mice
survived the potentially lethal dose
of chemotherapy, compared to the
100 percent mortality rate in mice
without stem cell treatment.
Gengsaid the next step will be to
translate his study to humans. He
said his study will be FDA approved
within the next few years.
In the future, if gastrointestinal
tract studies on humans prove suc-
cessful, this area of treatment has
the potential to help people under-
go higher doses of chemotherapy
so that the malignant tumors can
be targeted and eradicated without
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