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August 08, 2013 - Image 2

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Michigan Daily Summer Weekly, 2013-08-08
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Thursday, August 8, 2013
The Michigan Daily - michigandaily.com

Thursday, August 8, 2013
The Michigan Daily - michigandaily.com

11

Kunselman, Eaton win Dem.
City Council primary vote

Beat out Grand and
Higgins for Wards
3 and 4 after 8.6
percent voter turnout
By TUI RA DEMAKER
Daily News Editor
Ann Arbor residents went to
the polls Tuesday to determine
the Democratic candidates for
the Ann Arbor City Council,
settling primary battles in both
Ward 3 and Ward 4.
Incumbent Stephen Kunselman
(D-Ward 3) was re-elected to run
for Ward 3 with 51.76 percent
over current Park Advisory
Commission Chair Julie Grand's
48.13 percent. Longtime
neighborhood activist Jack
Eaton won Ward 4, acquiring
62.47 percent of the vote over
incumbent Marcia Higgins'
(D-Ward 4) 37.28 percent. In
both races, write-in candidates
received less than one percent of
the vote.
Wards 3 and 4 are the only two
of Ann Arbor's five wards whose
incumbents were challenged in
Tuesday's primary.
Gathered at CUBS' A.C.
Sports Bar and Restaurant on
Tuesday night, Eaton and a
group of supporters expressed'
excitement as the results began
trickling in. Despite an initial
issue in Precinct 9, when the
polling machines appeared to
have temporarily malfunctioned,
the results from Ward 4's nine
precincts looked promising for
Eaton almost immediately. He
carried all precincts but the first,
which Higgins won by three
votes to Eaton's one.
"I'm just humbled that so manN'
people have put their trust in me."
he said after hearing the official
results. "We first have to realize
that Irm one of 11 votes on council
and I'm the junior member of
council but m going to work
hard to assert those priorities that
voters told me were important to
them when I went door-to-door."
Eaton's victory marks the
second time in two years

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CAMPBELL
From Page 10
able to finish the race.
"You had to feel for him,"
LaPlant&said.
Couldthe 4x100-meterrelaystill
succeed without him? It's possible.
The order of runners would
need to be switched, the handoffs
reworked, the leadership replaced.
Was it likely?
"Not at all," Clarke said in May.
"I don't think so."
The 4x100-meter relay qualified
for the NCAA East Preliminaries

witha chance at advancing to the
Championships. Campbell couldn't
go to cheer on his teammates or
provide what he could do best after
having surgery days before. He sat
at home resting. Maybe he would
watch the race if he could find it
online somewhere.
The relay never succeeded with-
out him.
I may have fibbed when I said it
wasn't heartwarming.
Here is the story of an athlete
who walked on to the team with-
out expecting to be running for a

school. Here's the story ofsomeone
who spent five years training for
a chance to cement his name and
prove that running in college was
the right choice. Here's the story of
someone so close to seeing every-
thingcome together.
And that was enough to satisfy
Campbell.
"The fact that I've been able to
do this extracurricular activity and
excel at it in some shape or form,
that to me is just icing on the cake."
he said. "I've done what I needed to
do to position myself
"Track meant a lot of me, but the

end was coming up sooner rather
than later, and it just kind of ended
quicker than I thought."
This story doesn't end with the
injury, much like Campbell didn't
end his career as an athlete when
he came to Ann Arbor. He still
hasn't given up on running, either.
Recovery from a torn Achilles
can take up to 11 months, maybe
longer to return to the level at
which Campbell competed. He still
walks around with a boot on his
left foot.
In the mean time, Campbell has
moved to Miami to teach English

for Teach for America, a non-profit
organization that aims to eliminate
educational inequity. He's tossed
around coaching track and involv-4
ing students in athletics.
But that's all just part of the
larger plan.
"My plan for this Achilles is to get
it back to where I can sprint again,"
he said. "Once I got to the point
where I can sprint on my legs again, a
that to me, will feel really good.
"Then I'll have made it back."
Garno can be reached atggorno@
umich.edu and on Twitter:
@G Garno.

Stephen Kunselman (D-Ward 3) celebrates winning the Democratic primary at Dorninick's Bar with supporters Tuesday.

that he's run in the Ward 4
Democratic primary. Last year
he lost to current councilwoman
Margie Teall (D-Ward 4) in a
close race. He attributed this
year's different outcome to
increased name recognition
among constituents.
"Last year I went to a couple
thousand doors, I shook hands,
I talked to people, I came within
20 votes," he said. "This year
I went out and talked to those
same people and some more and
they just got to know me over
time ... they're coming around
to the idea that I was a realistic
alternative."
Councilman Mike Anglin
(D-Ward 5) and University alum
Hatim Elhady, who ran for Ward
4 in 2009 as an LSA senior, were
among supporters gathered to
celebrate Eaton's victory. Anglin,
who will run for re-election
in November, said he became
involved in Eaton's campaign
wh te discovered that his own
seat Would be unopposed in the
primary.
Higgins did not return
requests for comment either on

her location during the election
or her thoughts on the race itself.
Kunselman's victory in Ward
3 is an end to what has been a
somewhat turbulent race against
Grand. She has run her campaign
with an emphasis on an ability to
communicate with constituents.
Grand has criticized Kunselman
for an alleged detachment
from constituents. Kunselman,
who had previously called
her campaign's strategies
"deceptive", responded with an
emphasis on issues as well as his
six years of experience on City
Council.
"I communicate with my
constituents quite regularly,"
he said while celebrating his
victory with his campaign and
supporters at Dominick's Bar
on Tuesday night. "You know,
anytime they e-mail me, any
time they call me, I talk to them
and I communicate with them."
Kunselman said he will
continue to focus otr the
issues that he feels most
affects residents, including
infrastructure, police and fire.
He also said he plans to continue

his fight for the protection of
the neighborhoods which he
said has suffered from recent
zoning changes that have led to
increased high-rise buildings.
Grand did not return phone
calls following her loss, but did
say on Tuesday morning that her
campaign and supporters would
be following the race from Sava's
Restaurant on State Street. It is
unclear whether or not she will
run in future races.
Tuesday's results culminate
months of campaigning for
the four candidates and while
Kunselman will still have
a challenger in the race for
the general election, Ann
Arbor's 90 percent Democratic
population means that securing
the council seat will likely not
be as competitive as Tuesday's
race. The city does not hold a
Republican primary.
"This was the election,"
Kunselman said. "tm actualiy
looking forrward to the general
election because my opponent
Sam Devarti is actually a good
family friend.'
See PRIMARY Page 6

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