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July 18, 2011 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily Summer Weekly, 2011-07-18

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I1A: Last installment of 'Harry P er' films evokes bittersweet nost
ONE-HUNDRED-TWENTY-ONE YEARS OF EDITORIAL FREEDOM

Ann Arbor, MI

Weekly Summer Edition

_r

'U' alumni strive to
revamp Detroit
Graduates move to the city
to create new businesses,
charities and art projects in
hopes of revitalizing Detroit.
SEE PAGE3
Welfare woes
New legislation threatens
the well-being of
underprivileged families in
1 the state of Michigan.
SEE PAGE 4
Clever new summer
series Suits' up
Compelling characters and
fresh acting talent relieve
the season's TV lull.
>> SEE PAGE 10
SPORTS
Howard enshrined
in Hall of Fame
Two decades after winning
the Heisman, Desmond
Howard's mark will last.
>> SEE PAGE11
INDEX.
Vol. CXLI N.461 c2011 The Michigan Daily
NEWS 2. .. 2
OPINION ........ 4
CLASSIFIEDS....... .........6
CROSSWORD........................6
SPORTS ............................ 7
A RT S ................. ............9

RACHEL ROSS/Daily
The Ragbirds, led by fiery front-woman Erin Zindle, played Ann Arbor's Sonic Lunch at Liberty Plaza in Ann Arbor on Thurs-
day, July 14. This is the Ragbirds' fourth year at Sonic Lunch.
CITY CRIME
Pol ce work to _ake Ann
Arbor safer for residents

OFFICE OF ADMISSIONS
'U' releases
admissions
statistics
Admissions officials
attribute increase
in applicants to
Common Application
By BRIENNE PRUSAK
ManagingNewsEditor
For the fifth consecutive year,
the University received a record
number of applications from stu-
dents hoping to attend the Univer-
sity in the fall - 39,570 applicants
compared to last year's 31,613,
'according to University Provost
Philip Hanlon.
Hanlon wrote in an e-mail
interview he credits the increase to
the University's switch to the Com-
mon Application - a website that
allows students to apply to multiple
universities with one application.
"Because the University of
Michigan went to the Common
App this year, we anticipated some
increase in application numbers,
but I was surprised by the growth
in application numbers that we
have actually experienced," Hanlon
wrote.
He added that the prestige of
the University and the value of
receiving a degree from the Univer-
sity draw students to apply.
"This surge in applications, par-
ticularly from non-residents, is one
more sign that students and parents
across the country recognize the
value of a University of Michigan
degree," Hanlon wrote.
Ted Spencer, associate vice
provost and executive director of
See ADMISSIONS, Page 3

DPS and AAPD
deny an increase in
city crime rates
By PATRICIA SNIDER
Daily StaffReporter
Despite numerous recent
reports of crime in Ann Arbor,
both the Ann Arbor Police
Department and the University's
Department of Public Safety
claim crime rates are in fact not
on the rise.
Sgt. Mike Lance of the Ann

Arbor Police Department said
that while students may feel they
have received an increased num-
ber of crime alerts - especially
in light of a recent shooting that
occurred on Thompson Street on
July 1 and two sexual assaults
that occurred near Community
High School and on Greenwood
Avenue this past weekend - in
actuality crime rates in the city
have been on the decline com-
pared to years past.
Lance said the media has
exaggerated crime in Ann Arbor,
which has negatively shaped
public perception of crime rates

in the community.
"There's probably more
media attention, and there's
more reporting of (crimes),"
Lance said. "I think (the media)
does have an effect on the out-
look on crime ... I think it also
makes people more aware of
their surroundings."
Lance said the University's
Department of Public Safety and
AAPD engage in a cooperative
relationship and support each
other in handling crime, adding
the collaboration is currently
"better than it's ever been."
See CRIME, Page 3

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