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July 06, 2010 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily Summer Weekly, 2010-07-06

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The University Solar Car

-'_' .' a .. ..
lie
11, qfi

knn Arbor, MI

ONE-HUNDRED-TWENTY YEARS OF EDITORIAL FREEDOM

Texting ban takes
effect across Mich.
Police officers prepare to
enforce ban against violators
who text and drive.
>SEE PAGE2
The Patriot Act's
modern Red Hunt
A McCarthy-era victim
weighs in on Humanitarian
Law Project v. Holder.
>> SEE PAGE 4
ATS
The 'Twilight' of
good filmmaking
"Eclipse" is as colorless and
bland as Edward Cullen's
emotionless face.
>> SEE PAGE 9
SPORTS
Lucas-Perry
dismissed from'M'
The redshirt junior is released
from the basketball program
after violating team rules.
>> SEE PAGE 1i
INDEX
V.C ,N.142 2010 The Michigan Daily
michigadily.com
N EW .......... .. ................ 2..
C AIIE ......... .......4
CROSSWORD.............................6
SU D O KU .....................................8
A RT S .....................................9
SPORTS .................................11

Engineering junior Coli Givens and Business School junior Taylor Major set off fireworks in the Diag in commemoration of
Independence Day.
ENR LLMENT
Applications at record
high for class of

Med school
commercial
funds cease
Postgraduate classes to
no longer be paid for by
commercial groups
By SUZANNE JACOBS
DailyStaffReporter
Beginning next January, the Uni-
versity's medical school will no lon-
ger accept commercial funding for its
postgraduate education classes.
The decision - recommended
by the Medical School's Conflict of
Interest Group - is part of a broader
nationwide debate over whether phar-
maceutical and device companies
ought to have a hand in paying for
medical education classes.
Continuing medicaleducation,
or CME, activities provide medi-
cal professionals an opportunity to
learn about advances in medicine
and health care. In many states, CME
participation is required for doctors
to maintain their licenses to practice
medicine.
The Accreditation Council for
Continuing Medi Education regu-
lates CME across the United States
and has strict policies in place to
ensure that classes are free from
commercial influence, including fill
disclosure and management of .y
conflicts of interest of an individual
"who is in the position to control t'
content of an education activity."
According to a 2008 report frorr
the ACCME, about $1 billion - rough
ly half the total expenditure for CP.
classes - came from commerc
funding nationwide.
Medical School Dean Jar-
See CME FUNDING, Page

being offered admission as of Jun. 1,
Undergraduate the press release projected that6,350
students will begin classes as fresh-
Admissions projects men in the fall, setting an all-time
record for freshman class size at the
class size of 6,350 University and topping last year's
enrollment numbers by some 300
By DEVON THORSBY students.
Daily News Editor Erica Sanders, the director of
recruitment and operations for the
In a press release issued last - University's Office of Undergradu-
week, the University announced te Admissions, weighed in on the
that it received a record number of _ implications of an unusually large
applications - 31,599 in total - from incoming class for the University
the incoming freshman class for the community.
fourth consecutive year. Sanders said the record number
With 15,979 of those applicants of projected freshman for the 2010-

2011 academic year is an anomaly at
the school, and while it reveals an
increasing level of prestige for the
University, the increase in the size of
the campus community was not the
goal of the Office of Undergraduate
Admissions.
"Admissions have been competi-
tive to the University of Michigan
for a number of years," Sanders said.
"We look for a vibrant class of stu-
dents the University can learn from
and teach to explore many different
academic opportunities. But large
volume isn't really our goal."
The University confirmed in
See ADMISSIONS, Page 3

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