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July 24, 2006 - Image 2

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Publication:
Michigan Daily Summer Weekly, 2006-07-24

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2 - The Michigan Daily - Monday, July 24, 2006
'U' Profs: Bush's stem cell veto hurt progress

Michigan Gov. Jennifer
Granholm has tried to
loosen the state laws
By Sandy Uberman
Daily Staff Reporter
President Bush's veto of a bill to
loosen federal restrictions on live
embryonic stem cell funding this
past Wednesday may delay Univer-
sity scientists from developing life-
saving treatments.
There are two types of stem cells:
embryonic and adult. But unlike
developed adult cells, embryonic stem
cells are unspecialized and can devel-
op into all types of human cells.
This gives the cells potential to be
used in the treatment of many diseases,
such as cancer and diabetes.
"The longer it takes for the United
States to be involved in cutting-edge
aspects of stem cell research, the less
likely the discoveries that cells are

used for will be in America," said Cell
and Developmental Biology depart-
ment Chair James Douglass Engel.
The federal government current-
ly only offers funding to research
adult cells.
Because some consider the use of live
embryonic cells to be an ethical dilemma
and a destruction of life, their use in sci-
entific research is controversial.
Engel said University researchers
believe the debate hinders scientific
progress.
"The United States is isolated on this
issue," Engel said.
He said nations such as China and
England encourage stem cell research
and will surpass the United States in
scientific progress.
If passed,the proposed bill would have
relaxed Bush's 2001 policy, which only
allocates federal funding for destroyed
embryonic cells.
Many scientists believe expanding
federal funding would help the United
States compete in worldwide research
by encouraging the development of new

embryonic stem cell lines. funding could help cure diseases, such Michigan law currently prohibits
"In my own research, I can see as Parkinson's and Alzheimer's, as well developing new embryonic stem cell
where embryonic cells would allow as improve the economy. lines for research. To obtain these lines,
me an avenue to "The gover- Michigan scientists must get their sup-
develop a theo- nor is upset that ply from other states.
ry," Engel said. c c(Bush) turned Boyd said Granholm is a consistent
In his address The governor is upset his back on stem advocate for stem cell research and
to the nation last that (Bush) turned cell research has attempted to loosen Michigan's
Thursday, Bush and the state regulations.
said he would his back on stem cell of Michigan," Earlier this year,researcher Michael
not use taxpay- Granholm's Clark left the University for Stanford
ers' money to research and the state of Press Secretary University in California where the
destroy human ,,Liz Boyd said. state allows funding for embryonic
lives. M ichigan. Even with stem cell research.
Scientists - Liz Boyd federal help, As one of three federally funded
argue that live press Secret Gov. Jennifer Granholm University sci- embryonic stem cell research centers
embryonic cells P S 'entists are lim- in the United States, the Michigan Cen-
are already ited by state ter for Human Embryonic Stem Cell
being disposed regulations. Research is one of the top stem cell
of by United States fertility clinics. "We are already operating with more facilities in the country.
"The veto willdelaymedicalresearch, severe restrictions because we cannot Director Kathy Sue O'Shea said the
but will have no effect on a single human develop new embryonic stem cell lines in facility has progressed by developing
embryo," said Center for Stem Cell Biol- state," Morrison said. See STEM CELL, Page 8
ogy director Sean Morrison.
The veto came two days after CORRECTIONS
Michigan Gov. Jennifer Granholm
sent a letter to Bush arguing that Please report any error in the Daily to corrections@michigandaily.com.

I
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sudokdu
To play: Complete the grid so that every row, column and
every 3x3 box contains the digits 1 to 9.
There is no guessing or math involved, just use logic to solve.
Good Luck and enjoy!
Difficulty: Easy

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TUITION
Continued from Page 1
upon graduation.
School of Education Prof. Edward
ST. John, said the college-cost bur-
den has now transitioned from reli-
ance on tax dollars to students and
families.
But St. John said that given the
financial aid available, the tuition
increase "really isn't that much of a
burden on students."
The University faces a $80.5 mil-
lion deficit this year.
Aside from tuition increases, Han-
lon said the University will continue
to work on other cost-containment
measures.-
Students have more impact on the
efficiencies of the University than
they are aware, St. John said.
There is a built-in market within
the University surrounding students'
declaration of concentrations, he
said. Students' tuition is directed at
the school in which they declare a,
concentration.
St. John said that because many
students enter the University unde-
clared, funds reside in LSA until
they declare. Even for students who
remain in LSA, concentration dec-
laration affects University decisions
about hiring faculty.
If students were more organized in
declaring their concentrations,St. John
said, the University could respond by
providing the necessary faculty.
"The equivalent of voting booths
is major selection," St. John said. By
declaring a major, students are in a
way voting for the concentration to
which the University allocates its
funds, he said.
When too few students declare
majors within a school at the Univer-
sity, St. John said that drastic cuts are
made to contain costs.
For example, St. John said for stu-
dents that desire to go on to become
teachers, they tend to declare majors
late - and the School of Education
suffers.

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