100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

June 05, 2006 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily Summer Weekly, 2006-06-05

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

4

2 - The Michigan Daily - Monday, June 5, 2006

Health care experts
sound off on uninsured

Gov. Granholm unveils
state-wide low cost
health care program
By Kelly Fraser
Daily News Editor
In an effort provide healthcare
for more than one million uninsured
adults, Gov. Jennifer Granholm
announced her proposal to create a
low-cost state-wide healthcare pro-
gram last month, adding another
possible solution to the increasingly
heated healthcare debate.
The plan would redirect 1.1 billion
dollars from existing federal and state
funds and would not require addition-
al costs, Granholm said.
The program, similar to a health-
care plan in Massachusetts, targets
more than half a million Michigan

adults who qualify as small business
employees or earn less than double the
federal poverty line.
Granholm first mentioned the plan,
called the Michigan First Healthcare
Plan, in her State of the State address
earlier this year.
Last month was the first time Gran-
holm outlined its details, giving health-
care experts a chance to weigh in.
School of Public Health Prof. Cath-
erine McLaughlin said it appears the
Michigan First Healthcare program
would pool Michigan's uninsured and
coordinate standard guidelines with
private insurance companies.
By operating collectively, the pro-
gram will offer healthcare plans at
a lower cost than the premium each
individual would be charged on the
private market.
In order for the program to keep
costs low for customers, it must

draw a large enrollment of both
healthy and unhealthy people, said
McLaughlin, who is the director of
the University's Economic Research
Initiative on the Uninsured, which
examines healthcare issues from an
economic perspective, and is also a
member of the Citizens' Health Care
Working group, an advisory organi-
zation to Congress.
If the program only attracts custom-
ers with large medical bills, insurance
companies will have little incentive to
participate, she said.
On the private market, insurance
companies are automatically suspi-
cious of seemingly healthy people
who seek insurance, reasoning there is
some health problem the customer isn't
revealing, McLauglin said. Because
of this, companies can charge very
high premiums on the private market,
See HEALTHCARE, Page 8
'U' frat
president
pleads
guilty
From Staff and Wire reports
Following a confrontation with Ann
Arbor firefighters during aJanuary party,
Sigma Nu President Peter Small pleaded
guilty on three misdemeanor counts.
Small was charged with one count
each of obstructing operations, inter-
fering with fire department operations
and overcrowding. Small tired to pre-
vent firefighters responding to a smoke
alarm fom entering the Sigma Nu fra-
ternity house. Once inside firefighters
found several fire code violations.
Small faces up to 90 days in jail
and up to 300 dollars in fines at his
sentencing June 22.
PARDON OUR DUST.
DURING
RENOVATIONS
THE DAILY HAS
MOVED TO 413
E. HURON ST.

IMMIGRATION
Continued from Page 1.
This is because the officers are in the midst of Operation Motor City
- an operation to capture 65 individuals in the Metro Detroit area that
have violated immigration laws. Of the 65, 23 have criminal convictions.
The size of this weekend's operation was typical for the local Fugitive
Apprehension Team, which serves Michigan and Ohio, Baker said.
Currently, there are 28 Fugitive Apprehension Teams in the U.S., but the
number will eventually grow to 38. Each team has an apprehension goal
of 1,000 per year.
The operations are often mischaracterized as 'raids' by the media, Baker
said. Whereas a raid is random and reckless, operations are carefully planned
procedures, he said.
Following apprehension, officers interview each individual. Then, a "notice
to appear" is issued, informing the person to report to a port of entry and
present proper documentation, Baker said.
If a law has been violated, the individual must appear before an immigra-
tion judge.
The judge may order them to leave the country immediately or grant vol-
untary departure. Depending on the reason for removal, a bar is instated,
which prevents the person from returning for five, 10 or 20 years.
"They shouldn't be here," Baker said of illegal immigrants. "We are trying
to protect citizens by removing these criminals." 4
Summer in Rural Michigan
About 80 miles Southwest of Detroit, in Lenawee County, migrant workers will
See IMMIGRATION, Page 3
CORRECTIONS
Please report any error in the Daily to corrections@michigandaily.com.
420 Maynard St., Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1327
wtew. micltigetnd ally. com
JEREMY DAVIDSON ALEXIS FLOYD
Editor in Chief Business/Finance Manager
davidson@michigandaily.com business@micligandaily.com
647-3336 764-0558

1

sUdk u
To play: Complete the grid so that every row, column and
every 3x3 box contains the digits 1 to 9.
There is no guessing or math involved, just use logic to solve.
Good Luck and enjoy!
Difficulty: Easy

CONTACT INFORMATION
News Tips
Corrections
Letters to the Editor
Photography Department
Arts Section
Editorial Page
Sports Section
Display Sales
Classified Sales
Online Sales
Finance
EDITORIAL STAFF

Newsroom: 763-2459
Office hours: Sunl.-Thurs. 11 a.m. - 2 a.
news@michigandaily.com
corrections@michigandaily.com
tothedaily@michigandaily.com
photo@michigandaity.com
764.0563
artspage@michigandaily.com
763-0379
opinion@michigandaily.com
763-0379
sports@michigandaily.com
764-8585
display@michigandaily.com
764.0554
classified@michigandaily.com
764-0557
onlineads@michigandaily.com
615-0135
finance@michigandaily.com
763-3246

2 7 1 9 58
8 7 432
8 2 1
7 8
3 1 9
8 5 2 4
3 2 9
S'Pzl ysdkuydcto~o

Jeffrey Bloomer Managing Editor bloomer@michigandaily.com
Carissa Miller Managing News Editor miller@michigandaily.com
NES EDITORS: Kelly Fraser, Leah Graolski
lmran Syed Editorial Page Editor syed@michigandaily.com
Scott Bell Managing Sports Editor bell@michigandaily.com
ASSOCIATE SPORTS EDITOR: H. Jose Bosch
Andrew Klein Managing Arts Editor klein@michigandaily.com
ASSOCIATE ARTS EDITOR: Chris Goerig
Eugene Robertson Managing Photo Editor robertson@michigandaily.com
ASSOCIATE PHOTO IDITOR: Angel Cesere
Angela Cesere Managing Online Editor cesere@michigandaily.com
Phil Dokas Managing Online Editor dokas@michigandaily.com
BUSINESS STAFF
Ben Schrotenboer Display Sales Manager
ASSOCIATE SUMMER MANAGER: David Dar
Matthew Peurach Classified Sales Manager
Erica Brehmer Layout Manager
Trent Busakowski Production Manager
The Michigan Daily (ISSN 0745-967) is published Monday through Friday during the fall and winter terms by students at
the University of Michigan. One copy is available free of charge to all readers. Additional copies may be picked up at the
Daily's office for $2. Subscriptions for fall term, starting in September, via U.S. mail are $110. Winter term (January through
A pril) is $115, yearlong (September through April) is $195. University affiliates are subject to a reduced subscription rate.
On-rampus subscriptons for al trmare $35. ubscriptions must be prepaid. The Michigan Daily is a member of The

4

4

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan