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July 26, 2004 - Image 9

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Publication:
Michigan Daily Summer Weekly, 2004-07-26

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NEWS

The Michigan Daily - Monday, July 26, 2004 - 9

.Senate H use to hold August from Page 3
they can drink out of, s
hearings on intelligence Tehoe scares those people awa
The art fair provide

so a tippy vessel
ay."
ed an opportu-

WASHINGTON (AP) - Senate and
House committees will hold an unusual
round of August hearings on intelli-
gence reform after leaders of the Sept.
11 commission warned that America
remained vulnerable to another deadly
terror strike.
"The American people expect us to
act," Sen. Susan Collins (R-Maine),
chairwoman of the Senate Governmen-
tal Affairs Committee, said Friday. "We
don't have the luxury of waiting for
months."
Collins and the committee's top
Democrat, Sen. Joseph Lieberman of
Connecticut, said they would invite the
commission's leaders, Republican
Thomas Kean and Democratic Vice
Chairman Lee Hamilton, to testify.
The hearings will focus on two of the
commission's key recommendations:
creating a national counterterrorism
center and a new director of intelligence
to be confirmed by the Senate and with
Cabinet-level authority over budgets
and intelligence policies.

Congress began its recess Friday and
was to be out of session until after
Labor Day.
"This is a crisis. People died, and
more people will unless we get it
together," Lieberman said.
Senate Majority Leader Bill Frist (R-
Tenn.) and Senate Minority Leader Tom
Daschle (D-S.D.) also urged the com-
mittee to introduce legislation by Oct. 1
addressing the intelligence proposals,
and the committee said it would do so.
Late Friday, House Speaker Dennis
Hastert (R-Ill.), who has expressed
doubt that lawmakers would have
time to consider a sweeping intelli-
gence overhaul this year, said he and
Majority Leader Tom DeLay (R-
Texas) would also direct House com-
mittees to hold hearings next month
and make recommendations for legis-
lation in September.
Earlier in the day, House Democratic
Leader Nancy Pelosi of California
urged Hastert in a letter to reconvene
the House in August, and Hastert

responded that he would seek hearings
"over the next several months."
He later announced the August
hearings.
"The House plans to immediately
assess everything we have done ...
since 9/11 and everything more we
need to do," Hastert.
Kean, a former New Jersey governor,
and Hamilton, a former congressman
from Indiana, told reporters Friday that
swift action was critical. They said Con-
gress should get to work after the sum-
mer recess while the next president -
either President Bush or Democratic
challenger John Kerry - must push for
the overhaul soon after taking office in
January.
"We're in danger of just letting
things slide," Kean said. "Time is not
on our side."
In its blistering report Thursday, the
panel of five Republicans and five
Democrats cited multiple intelligence
failures that contributed to the deadliest
terror attack in U.S. history.

nity to learn what buyers want, but
also to talk to other artists in the
field. For Logsdon, talking to other
artists convinced her that being in
art fairs all summer could be the
right career move.
"Some older artists were tired of
(art fairs), of not being as settled as
they wanted to be. But others were so
excited to be creating their own art
and traveling from place to place,
meeting new people - those people
were so inspiring," Logsdon said.

Schumaker said she too enjoyed
talking with artists in the field, though
she said she doesn't think a summer
of art fairs is what suits her best.
"It was good talking to people
who already had the knowledge but
wanted to know how I made my
art," she said. "Meeting other artists
was great, and I think I'll apply
again next year. But it was way too
grueling to be a full-time job."
And for anyone who doesn't think
it's exhausting to be an exhibitor, just
imagine Logsdon hauling her pottery
from her booth near the Michigan
League to a van six blocks away,
twice a day.
"In that sense, it's really nice to be
done," Logsdon said. "That made me
wish I did photography."

E-MAIL
Continued from Page 3
Other changes to the BCP include free
and unlimited statewide MichNet dial-in
access. The printing allocation for stu-
dents will remain at 400 pages a semes-
ter, but it will be reduced for faculty and
staff from 400 pages to 50 pages.
The academic deans decided they
did not want to reduce the printing
allocation for students, Addis said.

Faculty and staff, however, do not
need to use this central resource
because they can use the printers in
their own departments and offices.
During the last fiscal year, which lasts
from July 1 to June 30, 22,850,000
pages were printed from the computing
sites in the libraries. ITCS hopes to
reduce this number so they can use their
budget to provide better technology,
such as bigger e-mail mailboxes and
more IFS space, Addis said.

the michigan daily
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pref. Exc. judgement & interpersonal skills.
Management exp. & familiarity w/UM-Ann .
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children.
SCOREKEEPERS SPORTS GRILL and Pub transporta
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310 Maynard.734-995-0100.
BABYSIT
START AT $9.50/HR. and make new friends 5 mo. inf
while supporting your University. MICHI- Very flex.
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flexible night and weekend schedules. Awe- 734-994-07
some Resume Builder! Work Study / Non-
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BUSES back and patterns in usage. This
Continued from Page 3 information will be used to provide
additional services.
Ann Arbor," Burress said. "I'll Plans for these services may
- -probably use the buses to come include extending hours or routes or
from home each day." increasing the frequency of buses at
Brown said the University is stops. Cook said these enhanced
h I'' planning to collect further data in services will begin in January 2005,
the fall in regard to passenger feed- after the data has been collected.
WE HAVE 4 sideline football tickets to-TC
gether with few steps. Will trade for 2 excep-
tional setsof2.517-605-8252.
s.. .- a

ENCED WEB DESIGNER needed
Arbor company. Contact Tracy at
40.

.

TER NEEDED 8-15 hrs./wk. for 2
Must love preschoolers, have own
tion, and be a non-smoker. Sched-
flexible. $8.00/hr. Call Kristine at
9578.
TER NEEDED. 10-15 hrs./wk. for
ant while mother works at home.
schedule. Located just blks. from
Staduim. Call Christine at
91.
ARE FOR girls (ages 1 and 3) in
Arbor home. PT (Mon, Wed, or
g. in mid-Aug. Experience and ref-
uired. Call 419-475-617.
OKING for a day care provider for
en year old daughter. I need some-
kes kids, can help with homework,
t meals and has their own trans-
I live just west of downtown. I am
or after school hours and am flexi-
ay would be approximately $10 an
rested, please call734-887-7502.
E CHILDCARE needed for 10 m/o.
er. Experience and references re-
P/T 30 hrs/week. Start Aug.
517.

ROOMMATE NEEDED- female grad stu-
dent for ru. in townhse. Furn., washer/dryer,
by hosp. & Dental sch. $60/tto. 341-5595

40 YR. OLD substitute teacher seeks lunch
date/meeting on Wednesdays. 419-335-3555
or2andy@toast.net.
LOVING COUPLE, BOTH graduates from
the U of M, are searching for a U of M stu-
dent for sperm donation. If you are attractive,
athletic, and have a healthy family medical
history please consider helping us. $5,000
compensation.Reply to dkd@mieye.com.

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