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July 10, 2000 - Image 3

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Publication:
Michigan Daily Summer Weekly, 2000-07-10

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The Michigan Daily - Monday, July 10, 2000 - 3
.University profs push for higher salaries

By Lisa Hoffman
For the Daily
Each year the University Board of Regents
announces the amount of money full-time profes-
sors earn. The numbers vary drastically, and
lower paid professors struggle to earn more.
The average full professor salary comes out at
@00,900, but in the past year the salaries range
from 529,800 to S352,816, according to the
University department of human resource's annu-
al analysis.
This six-figure average brings the most debate
from professors receiving lower salaries.
The University continues to raise salaries,
especially for the top professors, in order to keep
them on staff.
Though the University ranks among the high-
est paying universities, it feels constant pressure
from other top research schools, like Harvard,

Yale and Princeton.
To ward off this pressure. the University
imposes "loyalty tax - a pay cut that lower
salaried professors take to free up money to go to
star professors or those who receive outside
offers. This money goes to faculty pay raises,
such as the 4.9 percent raise given to the top pro-
fessors during the 1999-200 school year, promo-
tions and other special offers to hold on to top
faculty.
Paul Courant, associate provost for academic
and budgetary affairs, said, "Faculty members are
concerned that the only way to get paid well is
from outside sources, so it is important to treat
the people who don't go on the market well."
The departmental breakdown of the median,
average, high and low salaries appears each year
in the Yellow Book. This book shows the differ-
ence in pay between the 800 people paid on a
nine-month appointment and the 355 professors

Lion around

who received a 12-month appointment.
Professors on a nine-month appointment
receive an average pay of $ 101, 115, where a 12.
month appointment averages S139,057.
The 12-month appointments are given to pro-
fessors in the medical school and the more
prominent professors to keep them from accept-
ing outside offers.
Other bonuses such as "summer ninths," a sup-
plernental salary given to esteemed faculty mem-
bers who only have nine-month appointments,
are not included in the average salary, and thus
are not reported to the public.
The salary differences concern many profes-
sors within the University who feel that the
money pool available to the faculty is given
mainly to those professors regarded highly in
their fields.
Rudi Lindner, this year's chairman of the
Committee on the Economic Status of Faculty,
HAVEL
Continued from Page 1
He is not only a magnifice
Wright, but also a real def
-r,,. v freedom," he said.
After studying economics
lege and briefly joiningth
Havel became a stageh
Prague's Theater on the Ba
ie quickly moved up to
assistant director of the the
later its literary manager.
His first play, "The
Party," opened in 1963 t
acclaim.
In the 1970s, Havel be
defender of human rights
Soviet Un ion's invasi
Czechoslovakia.
lile formed committees tc
oppression and was jailed
times, spendine five years o
in pr ison.
After the fall of communis
late 1980s, Have emerged as
logical leader of his country
elected president of Czechosl
1989.
H Ie became president of th
Republic in 1993 and was re-e
1998.

was not available to comment on the current dis-
cussions, but suggested to the board that the
median salary be reported.
By reporting this figure, the overall report
would be far more accurate and not skewed by the
few highest salaries. The pay would not change
for either end of the spectrum, but the public
would get a more accurate figure.
University deans are now reviewing reports
from the CESF at the request of Provost Nancy
Cantor.
They will report back later this fall, when
Cantor will decide what will be done next.
Courant said the University must pay more to
keep certain types of professors.
"The problem will never go away, and there
will always be some difficulty. Surgeons get
paid more than art professors. That is the mar-
ket, and we have no choice but to respond,"
Courant said.
"He is not only a
mt play- magnificent
playwright, but also
it col-
e a real defender of
and at reedom "
lustrade.
become - Brian Porter
'ater and Assistant history professor
Garden
o much "This is a wonderful opportunity
to publicly recognize President
came a Havel and tire values at the core of
after the his life and work - integrity,
on of courage and a creative spirit that
cannot be shattered," University
protest President Lee Bollinger said in a
several press release.
f his life Havel has been the recipient of
many honors in his life, both for his
m in the literary and political accomplish-
an ideo- mrents.
and was Be is the winner of the
ovakia in Charlemagne Prize, the Indira
Girandi Prize, the Philadelphia
ie Czech Liberty Medal, three Obie Awards
lected in for playwriting, and the Four
Freedoms award, among others.

aF-f t v.
k ..
5 ,,..0. [.
'x _

A male lion watches its cubs from afar as it climbs through its home at the Detroit Zoo in Royal Oak.

ACCOu'EeCn I

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idelt ti HISTORICAL FRATERNITY ARTIFACTS STOLEN.
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