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July 19, 1999 - Image 13

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily Summer Weekly, 1999-07-19

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Scot Paul Lawrie made major golf
history with a ten-stroke
comeback on the final day of the
British Open. Page 14.

SI!oORTSu

Monday
July 19, 1999

Come home
to touch
football
By David Den Herder
Daily Sports Writer
Yes, I'll remember where I was.
A muggy, messy Ann Arbor apart-
ment with a television three sizes too
small for the room and its remote con-
trol nowhere to be found.
The couch was coarse and uncom-
*rtable, and the fan rattled as though it
would break apart at any moment.
Even so, I was
willing to sit and SPORTS
stare as CNN told
me that my hero's commentary
son - the only liv- -----------
ing link to a mentor before my birth -
was gone. No shock, no disbelief-just
intrigue.
I But as I watched the various news
encies air melodramatic pieces on the
Kennedy legacy - from Joseph and
Rose to all their children and grandchil-
dren - one sidenote kept catching my
ear, and forced me into reflection. In
their retrospective stories, the press were
always inclined to mention a game of
touch football as a staple of every
Kennedy gathering at the old house on
Martha's-Vineyard.
Some said it was symbolic of the
*cho mystique-that was expected of
ennedy males. Others mentioned it in
connection with the thrill-seeking, enve-
lope-pushing attitude that surrounded
the boys and many times got them in
trouble.
But I think, more basic than any per-
sonality trait, those roughhouse games
symbolized family solidarity. No matter
what was abuzz or what was amiss, the
'ennedys could always convene on the
eyard and the boys could always
haul out the pigskin.
One of the last vivid memories I
have of my mom's extended family
together is on a back lawn in mid-
Michigan duing a touch football game.
I remember catching a pass from my
ex-uncle, only to be touched down by my
cousin. I guess she was faster than me.
It was over Thanksgiving, and I sup-
pose we were all together during dinner
- in fact, I suppose we were together all
*ekend - but it was the game of foot-
ball that I can play back in my mind. I
remember the faces, I remember the
laughs, I even remember the sharp pain
as I stomped, bare-footed onto art acon
in the grass. Things weren't perfect in
our lives, but at that moment, together,
the most important thing on anyone's
mind was getting the rubber football
pa~st tire wsoodchrips, arnd ceebratirng
Sh kin.
Saturday, as I watched the btef
footage of the Kennedy bos on home
film, I saw the good times The way
things used to be.
If we could only go back go home
to touch football - together.

FORE A GREAT CAUSE
By Chris Grandstaff
Daily Spors Editort
When Bo Schembechler took
over as head coach of the Michigan
football team in 1969 he asked his
players to do one thing: beat OhioA
State. They listened, handling the
top-ranked Buckeyes 24-12 en
route to a Rose Bowl birth.
When Bo Schembechler coined
the phrase "Those who stay will be
Champions" his players listened -
capturing 13 Big Ten titles and two
Rose Bowl victories..
And last Monday when Bo
Schembechler asked an array of
celebrities and former players to
play in tire seventh annual Millie
Schembechler Classic at the
University of Michigan Golf
Course you better believed they lis-
tened.
"When Bo asks you something
you don't turn him down," former
shortstop and current Detroit Tigers
hitting coach Alan Trammell said.'
"We're all out here for a great cause
and we all know that when he asks
you to do something it's hard to
turn him down."
The event raised money for the
Adrenal Cancer Research Fund at
the University of Michigan
Hospital in honor of
Schembechler's late wife Millie,
who died from adrenal cancer in
August of 1992. Schembechler M
has already raised $1.5 million in Former Piston Isiah Thomas tees off at the Millie Schembechler
the first six years of the event and
has received over $3 million in Celebrities from all walks of the Isiah Thomas, Red
donations. entertainment, sports and political man Aaron Ward, for
"Our goal is to make the worlds were on hand for the event Steeler and current
University of Michigan Medical led by a large cast of former football reporter
Center the adrenal cancer research Wolverines. Detroit Free Press co
center for the world," Former Michigan football Albom, ESPN anal
Schembechler said in a written heroes Anthony Carter, Bump Michigan football ra
statement. "Still, there is no effec- Elliot, Pete Elliot, Jim Harbaugh, Jim Brandstatter
tive treatment for patients with Rick Leach, Jim Mandich, Reggie Beckman and Go
adrenal cancer. Hopefully, the McKenzie, John Wangler and Brian Engler.
donations will help develop new Griese were on hand. But the event v
treatment and better understanding They were joined by the likes of tribute of respect tC
of this disease." Trammell, former Piston great S

Icers face
bumpy
road slate
By David Den Herder
Daily Sports Writer
When it's almost too hot to think,
it's far too hot to think about hockey.
But somewhere between 64 and 84
degrees on the mercury last
Wednesday, the Michigan hockey
team announced its upcoming sched-
ule - conjuring up images of
sweaters, tube socks and hot cocoa.
And one tough road schedule to
boot.
The Wolverines will not have
much time to prepare for important
matchups. They jumpstart the 199t
2000 season at Notre Dame, in what
should be the marquee series of the
CCHA's opening weekend.
"I'm excited to play that already,"
said junior Mark Kosick, who led
Michigan through last year's postsea-
son and was named CCHA
Tournament MVP.
The Fighting Irish offered
Michigan several hard-fought contests
last season, including a memorable
See SCHEDULE, Page 15
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lyst Lee Corso,
adio announcers
and Frank
iovernor John
was as much a
o the legendary
See BO, Page 14

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1999-2000 season,
On campus, call D-A-l-L-V

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