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July 19, 1999 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily Summer Weekly, 1999-07-19

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One hundred eight years of editorialfreedom http://www.michlgandaily.com

Monday. July 19. 1999

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Goss
nswers
th
Sper
tui
CO m
ge
y Michael Grass to
ally News Editor li
All eyes turned to University
Athletic Director Tom Goss as he sta
began to speak from the Fleming ili
Administration Building's Regents b
Room podium at
the monthly meet- de
ing of the si
University Board
of Regents on
Thursday.
Goss has
become the prime
target of the media
in the past month
when a report indi-
Goss rated a $2 million
deficit this year for the Athletic
Department.
During -his presentation to the
regents, Goss indicated the department
could see air $880,000 surplus for fiscal
ear 2000.
After presenting the department's
budget, later approved by the eight-
member board, some regents rallied
behind Goss while others closely ques-
tioned his department's fiscal practices.
"We need to understand why
expenses are increasing beyond our
means," said Regent Andrea Fischcr
Newman (R-Ann Arbor).
# Newman said part of the problem is
a lack of communication between the
regents and the Athletic Department.
"It took a long time to get answers,
and when I did get them, they were not
good," Newman said.
Goss said new revenue-generating
initiatives not meeting expectations
and lower basketball revenues con-
tributed to the budget shortfall.
"I take loll responsibilities for thos'
decisions." Goss said.
In reply to Newman's statement.
3oss stid the such a deficit will not be
repeated next year.
"We hate procedures that are it
place to make sure that all teams and
departments operate within tteir bud-
gets." Goss said.
See GOSS, Page 2
Ann Arbor gears up for the annual
r: street art fairs set to begin on
Wednesday. Page 3.

Regents approve tuition increase

yNika Schulte
ally Nei's Editor
Creating the lowest hike in more than a decade,
e University Board of Regents approved a 2.8
rcent increase in all undergraduate student
ition as part of the 1999-2000 budget at their
eeting on Thursday.
Earlier in the week, University Provost Nancy
antor said tuition increases were kept low due to
nerous state appropriations. The University
ceived an additional 4.75 percent in state funding
r the coming year, bringing the total to $338.9 mil-
it.
"We are really happy this year," Cantor said. "The
ate appropriation works well with students and fam-
es and we were pleased to hold tuition down, even
elow what the governor's legislation recommended."
The in-state tuition for a lower division LSA stu-
ent will increase by $87 and $98 for an upper divi-
ton student.

LSA junior Elsa Argyres said she is not concerned
about the additional expenses she will have to pay
next term.
"Because I'm in-state, my family and I already
think we are getting a great deal." she said.
Argyres said her older siblings attended the
University and her parents have planned for tuition
increases throughout the years.
School of Education senior Danielle Cross said she
is glad the increase is less than it has been in recent
years, but said any extra costs do put a dent in college
students' bank accounts.
Cross said while an increase of close to $100 a term
"may not seem like a lot in the real world, when liv-
ing on a college budget, it is a lot when translated into
pizza and trips to the bar."
In years past, University students benefited from
the state's tuition tax credit, which allows additional
funding for those at institutions that keep tuition at the
rate of inflation.

1999-2000 Rates
Tuition and Fees
Lower division Upper division
Resident
LSA $3,074 $3,476
Engineering $3,248 $4,223
Kinesiology $3,248 $3,740
Non-resident
LSA $9,788 $10,482
Engineering $9,847 $11,062
Kinesiology $10,411 $11,382
Since the rate of the inflation for this year is 1.6 per-
cent, University students will not be able to take
advantage of the credit when filling out their income
tax returns.
Cantor said the tuition tax credit is expected to be
See INCREASE, Page 2
Donorsa
giv e $t.LOM
to Business
School
By Adam Zuwerink
Daily News Editor

"4 +:. '. ',

Students'
su pport
s citizens

By Ray Kania
Daily Staff Reporter
Despite great distance, a small
group of University students tent their
support to the 60(000 people in India
forced to trove from their homes last
Monday.
University Losmrnus Nishant Jain, a
member of the Association for India's
Development, said the group fasted
and organized a candlelight sigil on
the Diag to "show hit ie care" about
the Adivasi people forced to lease the
Narmada Valley to make way for an
expanded reservoir.

Niti Sharma (above) wife of a University student,
takes part in a candlelight vigil at the Gandhi
memorial (left) on the Diag last Monday.
The Indian government hopes to object to the construction of the dam,
increase the local water supply by but rather to the treatment of the dis-
raising the water level of the reser- placed Adivasi.
voir. Engineering graduate student Priya
Jain also said AID hopes to raise Sundaravalli Sudarsan, a member of
awareness of the issue in the United AID, said India's plan to compensate
States and to encourage Indian- the Adivasi monetarily is not satisfac-
Airricans to influence decision roak- tory because "they have no use for
ers in India. money."
The group's action coincided with She said the Adivasi, India's origi-
norldwide efforts as part of Narmada nal inhabitants are a non-industrial
Solidarity Day, which protested the people w ho do not rely on money.
Indirrn s'overnment's Adivasi resettle- Sudarsan said instead that the
reI IAicies. Adivasi "should be given land for
Members of AID said they do not See ADIVASI, Page 7

The University's Business School
recently received a $10 million gift to
establish the Samuel Zell and Robert H.
Lurie Institute for Entrepreneurial
Studies.
Donated by Zell and Ann Lurie, the
widow of Zell's former business part-
ner, the contribution will fund the
establishment of the Institute, which
will focus on practice-oriented research
and student projects in the business
field.
"There's a tremendous need for
entrepreneurial thinking in business,"
said School of Business Administration
spokesperson Keith Decie.
The gift is the nation's second-
largest monetary donation to an busi-
ness entrepreneur program. University
Provost Nancy Cantor told the
University Board of Regents on
Thursday that to her knowledge, the
Institute will be one of the largest of its
kind on any campus nationwide.
Serving as chair of the board for
two Chicago-basedt real estate invest-
See INSTITUTE, Page 3
) The Michigan Daily
Student Publications Building
420 Maynard St.
News: 76-DAILY
classifieds: 764-0557
Display: 764-0554

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Stanley Kubrick's haunting final movie, 'Eyes
Wide Shut,' keeps eyes open.
Page 8.

Bo Schembechler hosts the Millie
Schembechler Golf Classic at the
University Golf Course. Page 13.

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