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June 01, 1998 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily Summer Weekly, 1998-06-01

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abz Mihidganki g
One hundred sreven yen~ of ed turin! freedom

News: 76-DAILY
Display: 764-0554

Monday

*MSA student regent quest
moves to Secretary of State

By Susan T. Port
Daily News Editor
After months of extensive plan-
ning and meetings, the Michigan
Student Assembly's fight for a stu-
dent regent may have a few more
*bstacles ahead.
In this past semester's elections,
University students approved a $4
increase for MSA to begin collecting
signatures for a petition to place the
student regent issue on the statewide
ballot.
But MSA President Trent
Thompson said the University
General Council has found the

assembly's actions to be in violation
of its campaign laws. In response,
MSA has asked the Secretary of
State to decide if it is legal to use
student fees to collect signatures to
place the issue on the statewide bal-
lot would allow Michigan residents
to determine if having a student
regent on the University Board of
Regents is prudent. If approved, stu-
dent fees would be raised to
$400,000 to hire petition gatherers.
The Secretary of State must decide
that MSA is a separate entity from
the University and that the organiza-
tion is not a public body. This would

allow the regents to vote on the fee
increase at their upcoming meeting
on June 18 and 19.
Since the assembly will not know
the Secretary of State's decision until
July, Thompson said there will be a
stipulation at the iutie regents meet-
ing that MSA w ill not do anything
until we know it is legal.
Thompson said assembly members
have been meeting with various
regents and executive officers "to
prove hosva student voice would
benefit them"
MSA Treasurer Bram Elias, who
See MSA, Page 2

SIRINGINCA-HI)
By Amit Pandya
Dily StaffhReporter
While some University students spen
months relaxing with family and friends, o
different activity - hitting the books. S
are several advantages to taking spring or
es.
LSA sophomore Roruika Singh said
courses allows for more free time durin
winter semesters.
"By taking classes during the spring,
credits during the fall and winter" Singh s
give me more free time to get involved wi
ular activities around campus."
LSA sophomore Hanna Phan said he
time during the fall and winter semesters,
class during spring term "gets it out of th
LSA sophomore Charul Patel said she
reason for taking classes in May and June
"I have more time to focus on a sing
Patel, who is currently taking an economi
Patel said the summer offers the opport
small class, which gives students the cha
relationship with a professor that may n
the regular school year.
"The fact that my biggest class has 30
lot," she said.
University professors said they valued t
that exists between teacher and student a
they often see spring and summer classes
ums in which to work and learn.
"I refer a smaller class where the atmo
ANDY YOUNG/ Daly Ipee
Students participate in Chemistry 215, taught by Arthur Ashe, during spring intimate," said Barbara Weathers, a che
term at the University. Many students use the summer to take courses. See SP

MSA President Trent Thompson and Vice President Sarah Chopp are trying to earn
a student seat on the Board of Regents. They wish to start a petition drive.
700 discuss
future, effects
d the summer
ethers opt for a By Sarah Welsh
ome say there Daly StaftReporter
summer class-
When historians reflect upon the crucial events of our centu-
taking spring ry, which ones will stand out? One of the most noticeable
g the fall and changes in daily life has been the development and growth of
the Internet, but what elTect does computer technology have on
I can take less society?
aid. " This will These questions were the focus of the Marshall Symposium:
th extracurric- The Information Revolution in Midstream. The symposium
was held on campus last Friday and Saturday, and attracted sev-
has more free eral hundred participants. The symposium, which commemo-
since taking a rated the 45th anniversary of the Marshall Scholartship pro-
e way." gram, brought together leaders from diverse quarters of society
had a different - business, academia, journalism, law and government - to
discuss the past, present and future of the information revolu-
tle class," said tion.
cs class. The keynote speakers were Vinton Cerf, MCI vice president
unity to be in a of Internet Architecture and Engineering, and Douglas Van
ance to form a Houweling, who is on leave from his professorship in the
ot exist during University School of Information. Cerf is widely known as the
"Father of the Internet,' and Van Houweling is president and
people helps a CEO of "Internet 2," a consortium of universities, researchers
and businesses which is investigating methods of adding new
he relationship specialty "lanes" to the clogged information superhighway.
nd agreed that Cerf's address surveyed the brief history of the Internet,
as better medi- which began as a military project in 1973 and had no com-
mercial services until 1990. Cerf also spoke about personal
sphere is more impacts of technology - his wife's cochlear implant allowed
mistry lecturer her to hear for the first time in almost 50 years.
PRING, Page 2 Van Housweling looked to the future, predicting that new
See SYMPOSIUM, Page 2
S ia
owing Team
this weekend's . owl
12. ' http://www.pub.umich.edu/daily

* NEWS
Proposed legislation that
would aid arts funding moves
to the House. Page 3.

ARTS SPORT
Peter Wein talks about r .The Michigan R
directing Jim Carrey in "The finishes fifth at
Truman Show." Page 8. Nationals. Page

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