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August 10, 1998 - Image 2

Resource type:
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Publication:
Michigan Daily Summer Weekly, 1998-08-10

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2 - The Michigan Daily - Monday, August 10, 1998

CAREER
Continued from Page 1
applications for funds must be
approved by their local Michigan
Works! office.
"Michigan Works! is responsible
for approving the occupations and
supporting the high-skill, high-
wage, high-demand training pro-
grams," said Trenda Rusher, execu-
tive director of the Washtenaw
County Workforce Development
Board.
The Board will also monitor the
programs to insure that they are suc-
cessful in training the students for
their specific occupations.
After the specific programs are
approved, the Michigan Works!
Board awards each application with
the corresponding amount of money.
Guy Hower, director of financial
aid at Washtenaw Community
College, said his institution received
"$426,000 for 25 different programs
that were specifically picked by the
Governor's committee."
WCCC applied for more than the
approved 25 programs, but some
were turned down for not meeting
the "high-skill, high-wage, high-
demand" qualifications.
WCCC offers programs such as
robotics, nursing, radiography and
computer-aided drafting. Depending

on the program, students can receive
up to $2,000 for either a one-year
certificate or' two-year associate's
degree.
James Varty, dean of students at
Macomb Community College, reiter-
ated that the programs must train
students for the "high-wage, high-
skill, high-demand" occupations that
the Governor identifies as "Gold
Collar Jobs."
"Macomb Community College,
one of the largest community col-
leges in the state, received $1 mil-
lion, " Varty said.
Varty said many students will ben-
efit from the legislation.
"I feel that the placement percent-
age of students into the workforce
will be very high," Varty added.
Compared to four-year university
degrees, the "Career Scholarship"
programs were designed to "train
people at a technical level rather
than at a level of engineering,"Varty
said.
He said that a pre-engineering pro-
gram was rejected by the Governor's
committee because it was directed
towards a four-year degree.
For more information about the
Career Scholarships or programs
funded by the scholarships, contact
your local Michigan Works! office or
local community college financial
aid department.

CAN HAM
Continued from Page 1
Stevenson said.
If the different parts of renovation
are not completed in the right order it
might cause serious problems,
Stevenson said.
We don't want to "build something
and then have to tear it down,"
Stevenson said.
The Natatorium was first com-
pleted in 1989.
The estimated cost was $8.5 mil-
lion and the facility is considered
among the finest college-owned
swimming and diving buildings in
the nation by students and athletes.
LSA junior Randall Johnson said
last year he lived near the natatorium
and enjoyed swimming at the pool
every day.
"The natatorium is beautiful,"
Johnson said.
Johnson said he felt the changes will
improve the facility.
"The renovations that they will be
doing will probably attract more stu-
dents," Johnson said.
Johnson said students "know that the
natatorium exists, but I am not sure they
visit it."
The natatorium was built to allow
student athletes the opportunity to
excel athletically at the facilities.
Since the completion of the natatori-

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