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August 03, 1998 - Image 7

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Publication:
Michigan Daily Summer Weekly, 1998-08-03

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Monday, August 3, 1998 - The Michigan Daily - 7
4tate provides $6.5 million for special'U' needs

By Rae Goman
Daily Staff Reporter
The '98-'99 tuition has been increased by
3.9 percent and the question remains: How
long will it be before students can actually
witness their money at work around campus?
Students and staff may actually see improve-
Onts and additions this year, thanks to a
recently signed state budget plan.
July 21, Gov. John Engler signed the Higher
Education budget, supplying Michigan's 15 public
universities and financial aid programs with $1.6
billion for the fiscal year 1999.
The 3 percent increase in operating funds to uni-
versities will supplement the 5.5 and 4.4 percent
increases provided for the prior two fiscal years.
"Projected revenue was quite higher than we

expected it to be in May" 1998, said Kelly
Chesney, spokesperson for the Department of
Management and Budget for the state of
Michigan. "It was higher than what was original-
ly recommended in January."
As a result, the state was able to make generous
offerings to its higher education institutions this
year.
A supplemental one-time funding for the fiscal
year of 1998 will work in conjunction with the
1999 Higher Education budget.
The one-time ,supplement will provide $27.3
million to meet special maintenance, equipment
and technology needs among the state's higher
educgtion programs.
"The tuition and student fees is only one com-
ponent of the general funding budget, while the

state appropriations make up another,' said Joel
Seguine, information officer for the University's
News and Information Services.
While tuition has risen in past years, Engler
announced in a press release that the increases in
state funds "should allow universities to hold down
tuition, thereby helping to ensure that all Michigan
residents have access to higher education."
The southeast Michigan area alone will be
allocated $16 million to apply toward campus
improvements.
The University will receive $6,409,407,
with its Dearborn campus receiving another
$581,997.
"Ann Arbor, throughout the 90s, has received a
25.9 percent increase" in funds, said Chesney.
"That's pretty healthy, especially if you look at

inflation."
Other highlights of the bill include
$150,000 to support a new minority teacher
initiative, and a Tuition Incentive program pro-
viding $1.75 million to enable a greater num-
ber of economically disadvantaged Michigan
students to have access to higher education.
The Michigan Legislature has also provided a
2.3 percent increase for student financial aid
programs and degree reimbursement grants to
independent colleges and universities.
"Continued support for education creates
opportunities for Detroit residents and the sur-
rounding communities," Engler said. "These
advances will enable the graduates of these institu-
tions to be thoroughly prepared for the 21st
Century."

LEGISLATIVE INTERN position open in a
conservative GOP office. Duties include
research, public relations, assisting the
Senator for session, caucus and committee
rk. Contact Ben Ramirez, (517)373-7670.
KING FOR a full time smiler. Some-
one who is energetic, dependable, and caring.
Position offers excellent benefits, advance-
ment opportunities, and a health club
membership. Call the Ann Arbor YMCA at
(734) 663-0536 and ask for Rob Hess. -
MUSEUM OF ART-Security guard;
temporary, part-time; must be available
Thursday evenings and weekends. Call
Kathy 647-0517.
NOTETAKERS NEEDED!
Seniors & Grads. Attend class, take notes.
Eam up to $14/lecture. Variety of classes,
fltible schedule. Faculty approved classes
. Reserve a class of your choice for the
all teen now. Apply at Grade A Notes, 549
E. University Ave., or call 741-9669 for more
info.
PAID INTERNSHIP: Work as an Accoont
Executive at The Michigan Daily. Gain valu-
able work experience. Great Staff and pay
opportunity. Begins late August-call 764-
0662 by July 30.
PART-TIME OFFICE STAFF: Local
educational company looking for organized
and efficient office staff. 20+ hrs./wk. Call
662-3149 for information.
*JN POSTER SALES on college
campuses. Great opportunity to travel.
Guaranteed salary & expenses. Call Trent
Graphics for information: 800/821-9489.
SUBJECTS WANTED for perception
experiment. Takes 2.5 - 3 hrs., pays $25.
Must be right-handed and have vision cor-
rectable to 20/20. Call 936-2825.
TANFASTIC HIRING now & for Fall.
Must be available momings or afternoons 2-3
days/wk. Apply @ S. Main St. or E.
Michigan Ave. locations.
TELEMARKETING Eves. $7-512/hr. No
sellingl Call John 996-1157.
LEMARKETING Eve. $7-12/hr. No
ngl Call Allen 996-1107.
Tim Horton's
Up to 6.75/hr.
All Shifts
Fall Availability Necessary
Benefits include:
* Health Insurance
* free meals/uniforms
* 401K
4bonvenient to bus route
on get to work with Rose in a clean
friendly environment
Apply in Person at.
Michigan League
by Hill Auditorium
911 N. Universi

TUTOR FOR my 8th grade daughter in my
home after school. Math, French & Music.
Excellent pay. 995-0686.
TWO FALL OPENINGS. Early Childhood
Center needs someone to help open & close
center. Work with children 3-5 years old.
Start Aug. 31, Monday-Friday, 3-5:30 p.m.
Call Pat at 668-0887. Great fun & cam some
cash!
WANTED IMMEDIATELY: Light Main-
tenance/Groundskeeper for Scio Farms
Estates. Full-time. Competitive pay scale.
Call 663-8822 or apply at 6655 Jackson
Road.
Wendy's
Up to 6.75/hr.
All Shifts
Fall Availability Necessary
Benefits include:
a Health Insurance
, free meals/uniforms
* 401K
* convenient to bus route
Apply in Person at:
Michigan League
by Hill Auditorium
911 N. University
Michigan Union
530 S. State
chl d care
ANN ARBOR COUPLE looking for an ex-
perienced nanny to care for their infant son in
their home part-time. Please call 662-2712.
BABYSITTER FOR active 18 mo. old girl.
Flex. hrs., walk to campus. 995-9742.
DAYCARE ASST. part-time. Will train.
Own trans. Flex. hrs. 663-1737.
IN HOME CHILDCARE needed for my 1
yr. old son. Start 9/1. Mon. 12:30-6:30, Tue.
10:15-7. Refs. req. 971-5751.
. .
BASKETBALL FAN looking for UM 1985
NIKE DUNK BASKETBALL SHOES.
Blue and Gold. PAY UP TO $500 new or
used, Call anytime: 1-800/921-5411.

DONATIONS OF USED BOOKS wanted
for A.A.U.W. Fall Book Sale. No text books.
For information, phone 973-6287.
LARGER/FIRMER BREASTS!!! Safe &
Affordable alternative to implants! Fast
results! Toll-Free 1-877-6-BREAST.
LOVING, PROFESSIONAL couple desires
to adopt infant. This child will be cherished
& loved. Please do something beautiful for us
& yoorself. Expenses paid. Call Julie & Jeff
@ 1-800-631-6447.
THE BEST GIFT Name an actual star! Just
$35.50. Celestial Presence 800-446-3985 x-
1010.
Washtenaw Alano Club's
**GALA FAMILY PICNIC**
Don't miss the chance for a day of sober
family fun at Independence Lakel August 9,
Sam-9pm. Call 668-9401 for more info. See
you there!
HORSE TO LEASE-
$125/mo. Family Farm.
Great trails, rings, may show. Young
Thoroughbred Mare: Dressage, honest
jumper, loves people (or for sale-$3500}. Or
AngloArab Gelding-Smart, athletic. 1/2 hr.
west of campus-734-428-8796.
JOIN THE D"AILY.
COME TO A DAILY
MASS MEETING
AT THE STUDENT
PUBLICATIONS
BUILDING,
420 MAYNARD.
MASS MEETINGS:
TUE. SEPT 15
THUR. SEPT. 17
TUE. SEPT. 22
ALL MEETINGS ARE AT
7:30 P.M.

Two 'U' professors
given $450,000 grants
* The two scientists will use the funds to continue
their research on Alzheimer's disease and the
immune system
By Christina Branson
Daily Staff Reporter. "U of M continues
For the first time in history, the
American Federation for Aging Research to be a leader in
awarded one of its most prestigious
awards to two professors at the same uni- the fields of
versity. Profs. R. Scott Turner and
Raymond Yung were recently named the geriatrics and
1998-2001 Paul Besson Physician
Faculty Scholars in Aging Research. gerontologys
The American Federation for Aging
Research is a private, nonprofit volunteer - Peter Clear
organization that supports research on AFAR public relations direct
understanding the aging process and the
diseases and conditions that affect people important breakthrough with thed
as they become older. covery of a protein, XI1 alpha, wh
Every year, the AFAR offers the may prevent or slow the development
Beeson Award, which grants a three-year the loss of mental impairment.
faculty development support of $450,000 Although progress has been ma
to outstanding junior faculty committed over the past years, Turner stressesI
to academic careers in aging-related continued importance of Alzheim:
research and teaching. research and other aging research.
Turner and Yung were two out of 10 "Continuing the research will all
professors chosen for the highly com- us to get a better understanding of w
petitive award. AFAR commended both causes the Alzheimer's, as well as f
Turner and Yung for their work, as well ways to prevent and treat the diseas
as the University's research on aging. Turner said.
"The U of M continues to be a leader Yung said he also believes in the c
in the fields of geriatrics and gerontol- tinuance of aging research. Yur
ogy, or the scientific study of the aging research is of a different nature t
process, said AFAR Public Relations Turner's. Yung is attempting to de
Director Peter Cleary. mine how physiological decline in
According to AFAR Executive hormone production affects interact
Director Stephanie Lederman, the between cells of the immune syst
awards were based on Turners' cutting- and the cells that line the blood vess
edge research on Alzheimer's disease The significance of Yung's resew
and Yung's research on the role of lym- is the utilization of a novel cell track
phocyte homing. system that places a reporter genei
Turner's work on Alzheimer's disease lymphocytes - white blood cells,
"holds the promise of developing earlier homing studies.
screen and treatment programs for mil- Yung said the Beeson award
lions of Americans suffering from the allow researchers "to create a be
debilitating disease," Lederman said. understanding of how the immune:
Alzheimer's disease causes memory tem works and the effects of sex h
loss in older adults. The chance of get- mones, especially estrogen."
ring the disease increases with age. Yung said there are no answers
When Turner heard he received the the prevention of Alzheimer's diseas
award, he said he was pleasantly sur- his line of research, but "diet and e)
prised because the three-year grant will cise are important for the immune:
allow him to further his research. tem when combatting bacteria ands
Turner's work has already made an eases:'

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