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July 24, 1996 - Image 8

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Publication:
Michigan Daily Summer Weekly, 1996-07-24

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8 - The Michigan Daily - Wednesday, July 24, 1996

Committee reports latest progress
on search for next 'U' president

NEWS
y leaders work for healing after rally

0

By Jennifer Harvey
Daily Managing News Editor
The Presidential Search Advisory
Committee (PSAC) reported on Friday
that the search for the next University
president is making excellent progress.
"It's six o'clock and all's well,"
Jeffrey Lehman told the University
Board of Regents. The Board also
serves as the Presidential Search
Committee.
Lehman is the chair of PSAC and
dean of the law school.
Lehman said the PSAC continues to
make "excellent progress" in finding
possible replacements for the presiden-
cy vacated by James Duderstadt. He
said he and other committee members
are still meeting with members of the
University community, gathering input.
Lehman said the PSAC has already
amassed 275 presidential prospects and
continues to gather names. "We're get-
ting new ones all the time," he said.
"We have a large and diverse subset of
people."
PSAC members are contacting all the
prospects to let them know they are
being considered. Lehman said many
of the prospects have offered a "great
willingness to participate," while a

number of others have declined for a
variety of reasons.
Lehman said PSAC has already
encountered a number of rumors, some
of them quite ridiculous. He said none
of the committee members will respond
to the rumors.
Lehman said although PSAC is
"right on schedule," the most important
discussions lie in the future.
Regent Shirley McFee (R-Battle
Creek), co-chair of the Presidential
Search Committee, praised Lehman
and PSAC for their work thus far.
McFee also reminded Lehman of some
of the traits the regents would like the
next University president to have.
McFee said the president should be
an academic with business savvy. She
also said, given the challenges facing
the University Medical Center, the next
president should have "knowledge of
health care facility management."
Regent Philip Power (D-Ann Arbor)
said because the Medical Center is a
massive University budget expenditure
and generates such a large amount of
revenue, the next leader of the
University should understand how the
processes of an academic teaching hos-
pital work.

By Katie Wang
Daily News Editor
When many Ann Arbor residents
arrived at the Larcom Municipal
Building on the afternoon of Saturday,
June 22, they expected to hear the Ku
Klux Klan's rhetoric on white suprema-
cy. Instead, the loud, angry chants of 277
anti-Klan protesters drowned out the
words of National Imperial Wizard Jeff
Berry, who stood on the balcony of the
City Hall building along with 14 other
Klan members. The anger
and emotion of the demon-
strators combined with the W
hot afternoon heat resulted
in an ugly, chaotic melee, and A
ending with shattered
courthouse windows, eight but i
arrests and the use of tear
gas. thou
Almost one month later,
the city of Ann Arbor is
still taking steps to recu-
perate from that after-
noon's events.
About 100 residents, under the lead-
ership of the Women's International
League for Peace and Freedom, returned
to the Larcom Municipal Building bal-
cony on Monday afternoon for another
rally. Only this time, instead of a violent
confrontation, the rally ended with hugs
and hand-holding in an effort to heal
emotional wounds from June's protest.
"I really believe that everyone who
came there, regardless of their different
beliefs, believed in justice and wanted
to end hate and bigotry," said Elise
Bryant, one of the facilitators of the
"healing rally."
"This rally was very important to the
organizers and for the majority of those
who attended as a way to articulate their
feelings about racial injustice," said
Ingrid Sheldon, Ann Arbor mayor, who

attended the rally. Sheldon said she
thinks it is an important step for the city
in the healing process.
Council member Tobi Hanna-Davies
(D-1st Ward) said that although she does
not think the city has completely recov-
ered from last month's events, Monday's
peaceful rally represented "one small
step for the community among many
steps that are being discussed?"
Among those, Davies said, are work-
shops scheduled for October, which
e shall overcome ha
bigotry, not with viol
with careful and well
nht action,,, "

of City Hall," Sheldon said. "Although
it has been used in the past (as a podi-
um), we probably need to re-evaluate
that part of process."
Sheldon said if the Klan does decide
to stage another rally in the future, an
alternative venue that would fit the
court requirements protecting the First
Amendment would be used.
Members of the National Women's
Rights Organizing Coalition and Ann
Arbor Organizing Against the Klan,
two organizations that
have played a large role in
tred the rally are demanding
that charges against the
enCe six protesters who were
arrested and later ordered
P- to stand trial on charges of
felonious assault be
dropped.
"If they are convicted, I

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- Elis
Ann Arbor
deal with non-violent training.
"I think we need non-violence train-
ing so that people who would like to
protest the Klan in the future (can)
make it an active, effective but non-vio-
lent protest;' she said.
Since the violent confrontation
between the anti-Klan protesters and
the police, the Ann Arbor Police
Department has been the focus of much
criticism for its actions.
Sheldon said the department had to
"prepare for the worst and the worst did
happen."
Sheldon admitted in retrospect that
allowing the Klan to speak from the
balcony of the City Hall may have been
a decision that should have received
more consideration.
"We did not realize the psychological
impact of putting the KKK on the deck

e Bryant
resident

to see them sentenced to non-violence
training and hope they will participate
willingly."
Davies said it bothers her when peo-
ple drew analogies between the Klan's
behavior and the anti-Klan's behavior
"The Klan advocates genocide and act
on it," she said. "The Klan advocates a
type of terrorism on the groups they tar-
get. I do not condone the counter-pro-
testers who used violence, but I would
love to see them adopt non-violent ways
of putting out energy."
Sheldon said although a small group
of people are trying to keep open the
emotional wounds of last rionth's rally,
she is proud of the tact that not many
residents are following their call. 0
Should the Klan return next year, as it
says it plans to, Davies said she would
like to see all parties that participated in
this year's rally behave differently. "I'd
love to see the media handle it different-
ly, because essentially they held it up for
days and days before the rally," she said.
Bryant said she is not concerned
about the Klan's possible return.
"They are a symptom of a larger di
ease;' she said. "The people who at
drawn to the KKK reflect the culture
that supports racial superiority.
"We shall overcome hatred and big-
otry - not with violence - but with
careful and well-thought action and
peaceful discourse;' Bryant said.

hope the judge will use
creative sentencing,"
Davies said. "I would love

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