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July 17, 1996 - Image 3

Resource type:
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Publication:
Michigan Daily Summer Weekly, 1996-07-17

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N EW S Wednesday, July 17, 1996 - TheMichigan Daily - 3
Anti-Klan protesters in court for preliminary exam today
Two protesters faCe another two protesters were dropped ing charges of felonious assault against scared, of course, Defense Attorney against the anti-KKK protesters are
charges of felonious two weeks ago. Three more protesters police officers. Each felonious assault George Washington said in a recent being pursued in the usual manner.
assault in June rally are slated to appear today in 15th charge is punishable by a $2,000 fine interview with The Michigan Daily. "We bring charges where crimes are
r iici '.u i n iu~i n m r cxamtna - -A,. n4.. :«......\ . .: ... . __] .. . y <r.

By Jennifer Harvey
Daily Managing News Editor
Proceedings resulting from the June
22 anti-Ku Klux Klan rally are sched-
Sed to continue in court this week. Two
anti-KKK protesters have already been
ordered to stand trial. Cases against

District C-ourt for prenimary examina-
tions in the felony charges they face.
Russell Stewart, 21, and Michael
Helms, 20, were granted proceedings
delays on July 3. Their attorneys told
15th District Court Judge Ann Mattson
they had not had enough time to prepare
for the preliminary exams. Both are
scheduled to appear in court today, fac-

and up to sour years in pnson.
Jeffrey Anderson, 29, is also sched-
uled for preliminary examination today,
the originally scheduled date for his
proceedings. He too is charged with
felonious assault against a police offi-
cer.
"These kids are very bright, very
angry that they were charged, and

Washington questioned the
Washtenaw County prosecutor's rea-
soning in pursuing charges against the
anti-KKK protesters. "Why is the pros-
ecutor pursuing these charges and
wasting the taxpayers' money?" he
said.
Washtenaw County Assistant
Prosecutor David Lady said charges

committed," Lady said. "If there's evi-
dence to support, we prosecute a
crime."
Small groups demonstrated in sup-
port of the anti-KKK protesters outside
the Washtenaw County Courthouse dur-
ing the July 3 hearings. Demonstrators
said they would return to protest at the
remaining proceedings.

Orientation programs undergo transition, offer new emphasis

By Brian Campbell
Daily Staff Reporter
Incoming University students are
ceiving a slightly different orientation
program than new students of previous
years. The Office of New Student
Programs (ONSP) is giving them a
more pragmatic and academic introduc-
tion to the University, said Penny Reid,
director of New Student Programs.
Reid emphasized the need to focus
the three-day orientation program on
fully preparing the students for the first
v of classes in the fall. Reid said
Tanners asked themselves certain ques-
tions when designing the revised pro-
gram. "What do the students need to
know? When do the students need to
know it? And in what form can we pro-
vide it to them?" Reid said.
Reid, along with the many coordina-
tors and faculty involved in the orienta-
tion process, is trying to answer those
fundamental questions by bringing the
faculty closer to the students.
*On the morning of the first day, new
students are introduced to an academic
panel of whom they can ask questions.
In addition to the academic panel, Reid

said faculty involvement is increasing
due to greater success in recruiting for
the Mentorship program, now under the
auspices of ONSP
Other changes include putting the ori-
entation fees on the September billing
statement, specific orientation services
for transfer and graduate students, and
the establishment of the Information and
Referral Center, which will complement
other information centers on campus to
assist new students.
Today's new students are also given a
more thorough introduction to comput-
ing on campus. Reid explained the
increased technological emphasis.
"Orientation is a time before classes
start for the students to get their feet on
the ground, to get prepped-up before
those first classes start," she said.
To ensure that new students are on
firm ground, Reid said they must
become familiar with Wolverine Access,
e-mail and the World Wide Web. Reid
said she is creating a question & answer
web site for new students.
As in previous years, the orientation
program is conducting panels egaruing
University Health Services, the

Department of Public Safety, diversity,
acquaintance rape and the Sexual
Awareness Prevention and Awareness
Center.
This year's discussions about diversi-
ty on campus have also been reassessed
and revised. What were called diversity
workshops last summer are known as
Global Community sessions this year.
In a 40-minute session, the new' stu-
dents are presented with a hypothetical
situation that might stir racial preju-
dices, after which they discuss personal
feelings about the selected situation,
trying to resolve any conflicts between
them. A potentially uncomfortable situ-
ation might be their reaction upon see-
ing a dorm poster of the confederate
flag or advocating the "black power"
movement, reminiscent of late-60's
Black Panther activism.
"I think (the workshop) is effective in
a different way," said Alyssa Duarte, a
diversity facilitator. "It's not as con-
frontational."
Duarte said she thinks the message of
the program is awareness of the impact
ot diversity on campus.
In previous years, the diversity see-

tion of the orientation program lasted
about twice as long and often contained
an "administrative video," which creat-
ed a more instructive environment.
Reid said the program is inclusive
enough to give new students a taste of
the diverse campus.
"You can't change people's values in
40 minutes. What we can do is introduce
the students to the community. We want
to leave them with the desire and intent
to start talking about racism and to cre-
ate other opportunities to learn about it.
We want to conclude the session without
concluding the topic," she said.

The diversity section of the orienta-
tion program has been a contentious
subject since its inception in 1988,
being criticized by student volunteers,
and some University administrators.
The program has evolved through
the years, picking up programming
including skits, videos, facilitators and
excercises, and reassessing after each
summer orientation program concludes.
In their evaluations, students partici-
pating in the new diversity session have
given the diversity discussion slightly
above average ratings, and the general
orientation program a good rating.

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