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June 07, 1995 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily Summer Weekly, 1995-06-07

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

8 - The Michigan Daily - Wednesday, June 7, 1995

CAR
Continued from page 1
safe," Lesley said.
The car resembles a race car instead of
a typical four-door sedan.
"Because it is so aerodynamic and
only seats one person, it is not like an ev-
eryday car. It is more like a race car or an
Indy car in its design and construction,"
White said.
The challenge of the Sunrayce is to
complete the 1,150 miles without using a
drop offuel. To qualify for the race, the car
must be able to complete 50 miles around a
closedcourseat an average speed of25miles
per hour.
The race lasts nine days that average
between 70-180 miles a day. The racing
begins each morning at 10 a.m. andends at
7 p.m. with a 15-minute mandatory
break in the afternoon to change drivers.
The car with the lowest cumulative time
at the end of the race is the winner.
"We are confident we can bring home
another Sunrayce championship," White
said.
Students from the United States,
Canada, Mexico and Puerto Rico will join
the race to make it an international event.
The solar car racing teamis entirely stu-

dent run. Research, design, manufacturing,
fund-raising and administration have all
been performed by students.
"I think it is really interesting that tl.
project is done entirely by students. We
have done everything from the design to
the manufacturing," White said.
This solar car team, which is the third
team from the University to enter the com-
petition, was started in September 1993.
The first year of the team was devoted to
research and design. Construction on the
car began in August 1994.
"It is amazing, looking back at the
ginning now that the race is almost here,
Lesley said. "Even if we don't win it will
be something I will always remember."
This project is more than just an extra-
curricular activity to the participants.
"You are doing things because you
want to," said Andrew Schrauben, an En-
gineering first-year student.
The solar car team is working off a
$1.2 million budget. The U.S. Department
of Energy provided 30 teams with $3,000
seed money and the rest of the budget w
raised by students through corporate and
private donations.
Fifteen students and the faculty ad-
viser, will be traveling with the carto In-
dianapolis.

SARA STILLMAN/ta~I
The Potter's GuildS
Ann Arbor resident Margret Douglass looks at a bowl created by one of the 40 artists whose works were displayed at
the Ann Arbor Potter's Guild sale last Sunday. The guild offers lessons and serves as a co-op for local potters.

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Continued from page 1
murdered more than one year ago.
On Monday, an Ann Arbor taxi.
driver testified that he observed Mitchell
walking the streets early Christmas
morning. Later, the driver contacted the
police, leading to Mitchell's arrest be-
cause he resembled a description of a
suspect wanted in connection with a
purse-snatching attempt the day before.

The jurors will also follow the same
route the mugging victim traveled from
Jackson Road to a house in the 1800.
block of Dexter Avenue.
Also to be visited are an apartment
building in the 800 block of Miller Av-
enue where a woman was raped in No-
vember 1993 and the 400 block of
Longshore Drive where, in October
1993, a University student was knocked
unconscious and raped.
The Eberwhite Woods victim also tes-
tified last week. She does not recall the ac-

tual attack, only waking up in the hospital.
"There's terror, fright," she said. "I
don't go any place by myself anymore."
On Thursday, a.University student
recounted the details of her being ag
tacked and burst into tears on the witness
stand. The next day, the mugging victim
testified to being allegedly attacked by
Mitchell. After the assault, she required
eight stitches to her mouth.
None of the victims in court could
positively name Mitchell as their assail-
ant. The prosecution will rely on matches
between samples of Mitchell's DNA and
semen recovered from the victims.
The trial started last week after an e,
tensive jury selection process and is ex-
pected to continue non-stop for two more
weeks. During that time, the jury will be
sequestered in a hotel when not in court.

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