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August 10, 1994 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily Summer Weekly, 1994-08-10

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SUMMER WEEKLY
enehudthreyar s
One hundred three years of editorial freedom

Scholar Mandate' may require research for graduation

1

ulie Becker
AILY STAFF REPORTER
This fall, administrators will be discussing yet
nother possible requirement for graduation from
ie University.
The.proposalunder discussion is the so-called
Scholar Mandate," which would require all un-
lergraduates to do research before graduating
rom the University. Introduced in January by
lice President for Research Homer Neal, the
roposal defines research very broadly-includ-
ag opportunities for work in the humanities,
ocial sciences, the arts and the natural sciences.
"There is nothing at all definite," said Gary

Krenz, assistant to the vice president for research.
"Our office has been trying to provide assistance
as needed, but it's really up to the provost and the
deans."
The proposal will be brought up in September
to the deans of the various schools and colleges,
who - if they like the plan - will take it to their
respective faculties for discussion and final deci-
sion.
"Right now it hasn't even been introduced ...
in a decision-making group," said LSA Dean
Edie N. Goldenberg.
LSA Associate Dean Michael Martin, who
heads the LSA curriculum commitee, said he

supports undergraduate research, but is unsure ing them is "a big enough task" in itself.
whether requiring it is a good idea. Recent LSA graduate Reed Konsler, who did
"We want very much to increase the options research for more than three years as an under-
for research participation," Martin said. "(But) graduate, said, "I think research is definitely very
I'm not sold on the idea of a requirement." important.... It's what made my undergraduate
Martin expressed concern about having the education worthwhile."
resources to implement such a requirement, a However, Konsler was unenthusiastic about a
concern shared by Sandra Gregerman, director of possible research requirement. He noted that it
the Undergraduate Research Opportunities Pro- might create a "two-tiered" systemofresearchers
gram. -those who are really interested in research, and
"Clearly there's a very strong interest on the those who are only doing it because ofthe require-
part of students in research," Gregerman said. ment. "I think that most of the people who would
However, she added that the program has 800 get anything out of research are already getting
students participating this year, and administer- it," he said.
Ci
awaits
movein

Candidates kick off race
for Nov. 8 election votes

yJoshua Ginsberg
OR THE DAILY
Since their nominations last week,
Democrats and Republicans running
or offices have begun preparations for
the general elections on Nov. 8.
V Former Democratic U.S. Rep.
Ioward Wolpe will face Republican
Gov. John Engler. Wolpe won a close
ace against Debbie Stabenow in the
aries, while Engler ran without a
rimary opponent.
Wolpe's support from labor and a
trong showing among Detroit voters
ave him an edge in the primaries.
Wolpe said he will be a tough chal-
enge for Engler. Full of enthusiasm
nd optimism, Wolpe remarked that he
ould feelthemomentumbuilding dur-
ng a 102-hour campaign swing before
hejrimary election.
Johi Engler has got to go. We're
oing to pack him up and we're going
o move him out," Wolpe said.
Although Engler expected to be
nning against Stabenow, he doesn't
nkthatWolpe'snomination willhave
significantly different outcome.

Engler said that whoever his oppo-
nent is will oppose Republican efforts
"to cut taxes, reduce welfare and re-
duce the cost and the size of the govern-
ment..... Ithink that they're out of touch
with where Michigan voters are."
For Wolpe, a major task between
now and Nov. 8 will be to reunite his
party against Engler, whose support
was undivided.
Republican Spencer Abraham and
Democratic U.S. Rep. Bob Carr will
compete for Sen. Donald Riegle's seat
in the U.S. Senate. Carrran acloserace
for the Democratic nomination against
state Sen. Lana Pollack.
Pollack, an Ann Arbor senator since
1982, trailed Carr by only 1 percent or
5,589 votes.
Carr's moderate voting record in
the past could have put him at a disad-
vantage in the primaries, but it may
help to draw Republican votes in the
general election.
He willface strong opposition from
Abraham, who chaired the Michigan
Republican Party from 1983-90.
See ELECTIONS, Page 2

* 'U' cannot enforce
staggered move-in
plan, AATU says
By Michelle Lee Thompson
DAILY STAFF REPORTER
The 10,000students whomoveinto
the residence halls in two weeks will
bring lofts, clothing, futons and other
"collegiate necessities."
They will also bring a lot of traffic,
left meandering about the streets of
Ann Arbor with nowhere to park and
precious few streets with space to drive
on.
To help solve the problems, the
University has devised a new move-in
plan. The schedule this year is "stag-
gered"toease congestiononand around
JONATHAN LURIE/Daly campus, according to the booklet sent
President Clinton gives his support to Howard Wolpe and Bob Carr. to students who will be living on cam-
pus.
Aug. 31 and Sept. 1 are the desig-
gate high cost of textbooks ntedasmoen days fortyeand
transfer students, and each day's plans
The committee decided to meet LSA. carry different residence halls' open-
again Aug. 26 to set up a task force to Committee members said they were ings, and include most CentralCampus
increase awareness of the topic and to not aware of student complaints. dorms. Sophomore, junior and senior
prepare a "tip sheet" for faculty about "Ireally have to say that we haven't students living on campus are asked to
the subject in the interim. been aware of this at Michigan," said moveEa QuadN t Campus and other
Representatives from the state leg- Associate Provost Susan Lipschutz, a h
islature, universities and bookstore committee member. "It's been handled housing residents may move in on or
owners discussed the high prices and by the bookstores. They circulate the after Aug. 31, the day student leases
low resale value of textbooks and re- request for book orders and have a B the terms of their leasesstu-
lated student complaints in the Michi- cover letter saying it's important but it dentshave theright tomove in n 'Aug.
gan Union. Despite the focus on stu- doesn't have the same conviction as if 31, when their leases begin, although
dent concerns, the only student present the letter came from someone else." thenrsi asehbes u eal
was Mike Christie Jr., a Michigan Stu- Committee members debated if the
dent Assembly representative from See TEXTBOOKS, Page 3 Se Movy-N, Page 2

tate House,
rank C. Lee
AlLY STAFF REPORTER
As students migrate back to cam-
us, textbooks will weigh heavily on
eir minds. However, they won't be
e only ones taking a hard look at
xtbooks and their prices.
In July, President James J.
uderstadt directed Provost and Ex-
ve Vice President for Academic
rs Gilbert R. Whitaker Jr. and
ice President for Student Affairs
aureen A. Hartford to construct a
lan to deal with the cost of textbooks.

'U' to investit
"Theprovostandlagreedweshould
put together acommittee to spend some
time looking at it this fall," Hartford
said. "We came up with some names
that the provost was going to appoint."
Hartford said the committee will be
looking more into the book-ordering
process at the University. She said the
committee will begin meeting this fall.
Besides University discussion, the
state Legislature is looking atthe topic.
A meeting Aug. 3 on textbook prices
held by the Michigan Houses' Higher
Education Committee debated the topic.

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