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July 20, 1994 - Image 2

Resource type:
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Publication:
Michigan Daily Summer Weekly, 1994-07-20

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2- The Michigan Daily - Wednesday, July 20, 1994

Crrv
Continued from page 1
The University bought Eisenhower
Corporate Park West just 18 months
after purchasing Wolverine Tower,
which cost the city $316,000 in annual
tax revenue. The University made both
purchases with little warning to city
officials.
"One of the problems with city-
Universitycommunicationisthatthere
is none," said Julie Creal, a Republican
COMPARE
THE

city councilmember fromthe4th Ward.
"Just like the Wolverine Tower, we
found out about this after the sale went
through. That's frustrating."
Womacksaidcityofficialsareblow-
ing the problem out of proportion. "It's
not as though we're buying every prop-
erty in town. We bought two, for God's
sake."
To help remedy the situation, Gatta
suggeststhe University issue an "urban
impactstatement"wheneveritmakesa
move that affects the city.
Gatta said the statement should in-
clude measures the University would
take to blunt any negative fallout from
its plans. While calling Gatta's pro-
posal a "good first step,"
Councilmember David Stead (D-5th
Ward) said further measures must be
considered to avoid "a deterioration in
the quality of life for our residents."
But Womack dismissed Gatta's
suggestion, asserting that the

University's overall impact on the lo-
cal economy is overwhelmingly posi-
tive.
"The city administrator and others
focus on a single building rather than
the institution as a whole," Womack
said.
And Lisa Baker said informing the
city of impending purchases would
jeopardize negotiations with the prop-
erty owners.
"We can't always let people know
when a property transaction is about to
take place. The reality is that such
transactions can't be discussed in pub-
lic before they happen," she said.
The University had been negotiat-
ing the purchase of Eisenhower Corpo-
rate Park West since early 1993, when
the owners were asking for at least $9
million.
But Gatta said he was not informed
of the purchase until the night before
the regents approved it.

I

-a

b

ROACH
Continued from page 1
Open Meetings Act and the Freedom
of Information Act during the search.
Roach said he believes the court
rulings on the search will make it more
difficult to conduct presidential
searches in the future.
Religious
Services
AVAVAVAVA
ANN ARBOR CHRISTIAN REFORMED CHURCH
1717 Broadway (near N. Campus)
665-0105
Traditional Service-9 a.m.
Contemporary Service- 11:15 a.m.
Evening Service- 6 p.m.
Complete Educational Program
Nursery Care Available at all services
ARST UNITARIAN UNIVtRSALIST CHURCH
1917 Washenaw 665-6158
CtmNAY: Service - 9:15 a.m.
A Welcoming and Affirming Congregation
Reverend Kenneth W. Phifer

I

"If you think what you tell this
inquirer is going to end up in the news-
paper, what do you tell them?" Roach
asked. "This undermines the processof
confidential inquiry."
But Petykiewicz said the regents
need to be accountable to the public
throughout the search.
"I think it makes it more difficult
for the regents to do their job. I don't
think it makes it any harder to find a
college president," he said.
Vice President for University Rela-
tions Walter Harrison said University
officials did not have a position on the
ruling, since they are no longer
involved."The regents already tum
over all their papers and Tom Roach
decided to take another course of ac-
tion," he said.
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Phone: 665-92 ax:932 5

FAIR
Continued from page 1
Briarwood Mall and Pioneer High
School tostreetsnearthefair. Signswill
be posted on highways entering the city
directing visitors to the shuttle lots.
Froelich, an Ann Arbor native and
University alum, has worked as the art
fair coordinator fornine years. She said
the art fair benefits the city in many
ways. The fair serves as a huge eco-
nomic boost for the city. Froelich esti-
mated it brings 37.50to 50 million tour-
ists' dollars to the city.
"It's a big boost. We order more
jewelry, but mainly we move every-
thing outside to catch the passers-by.
They see the cool stuff outside and then
come in to look. We really look for-
ward to the fair," said Kathy Warrow,
assistant manager of Middle Earth, a
gift store on South University.
Froelich said that close to 2,000
artists applied and only 189 booths are
available. Organizers chose the artists
through an intense selection process.
One native of the fair, sculptor
Steffanie Samuels, said she looks for-
ward to displaying her work to an ap-
preciative audience.
"This is my fourth year and I really
enjoy getting toseepeoplewhoIhaven't
seen in a year or more. Ann Arbor has
a loyal following. It is definitely one of
the best shows, if not the best show, in
the nation," Samuels said.
Visitors to the fair will also be able
to see demonstrations by a number of
artists at various times during the fair.
"All the artists are very friendly,
they enjoy talking to the public, they
get some of their ideas from the public.
They like to get to know the people
who take their work home with them,"
Froelich said.
The fair runs from 9 a.m. to 9 p.m.
Wednesday through Friday and 9 a.m.
to 5 p.m. on Saturday.

REVELLI
Continued from page 1
said Maggie St. Clair, administrat
assistant of the marching band. "He
would come into the office on a pretty
regular basis after he retired, and would
tell stories about his experiences. He
could remember where a particular stu-
dent sat, who they married, what their
children did, what they are doing now.
... I don't think I've ever knew any-
body like him."
Revelli was a recipient of S
Interlochen Academy of Arts Medal o
Honor.
He was one of the first living in-
ductees to the National Band Associa-
tion Hall of Fame of Distinguished
Band Conductors.
Revelli began conducting in 1929in
Hobart, Ind. Originally hired as super-
visor of music, he did not let lack o
rehearsal space and funding stop
Hobart High SchoolConcertBand fr
becoming six-time national champions
Six years later, Revelli was nam
as the University's director of band
and chair of the wind instrument de
partment. He held the position for 3
more years.
From a single band and a depart
ment staffe only by himnself, Revell
developed the program into one
seven bands, in excess of500 mem
and a nationally recognized faculty.
Revelli's success, though, was no
limited to this country alone.
In 1961,theUniversity'sSymphony
Band, sponsored by the State Depart-
ment, wentona 16-week, 30,000-mile
88-concert tour with performances i
the Soviet Union, Jordan, Lebanon
Romania and Poland, among othe
countries.
The University recognized his o
standing service by honoring him wi
the Faculty Award for Distinguishe
Achievement in 1961.

I

HURON VALLEY COMMUNITY CHURCH
Gay-Lesbian Ministry 741-1174

LUTHERAN CAMPUS MINISTRY
LORD OF LIGHT LUTHERAN CHURCH, ELCA
801 South Forest (at Hill)
SUNDAY: Worship loam
John Rollefson, Campus Pastor 668-7622
ST. MARY'S STUDENT PARISH
(A Roman Catholic Community at U-M)
Corner William and Thompson St.
Across from Cottage Inn
Weekend Liturgies-MONDAY &
WEDNESDAY: 5:10 pm
FRIDAY: 12:10 pm
SUNDAY: 8:30 am, 10 am,
12 noon, and 5 pm
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
1151 Washtenaw (near Hill Street)
Summer Schedule
SUNDAY: Worship 9:30am
WEDNESDAY: Supper & Devotion 6pm
Pastor Ed Krauss 663-5560
WELS LUTHERAN CAMPUS MINISTRY
Redeemer Lutheran Church
1360 Pauline Boulevard
Sunday Worship, 9:30AM
Robert Hoepner, Pastor
662-0663

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