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July 13, 1994 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily Summer Weekly, 1994-07-13

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

2 - The Michigan Daily - Wednesday, July 13, 1994

-I

IRELAND
Continued from page 1
Maranda's first-term GPA at the
University was a 2.8, showing that she
experienced the same first-term diffi-
culties of many other new students.
But she could not finish winterterm
due to the many hours of court pro-
ceedings.
After Ireland filed suit for parental
support against Maranda's natural fa-
I "" "= I

ther, a studentatMacomb Community
College, Smith cross-fired with a suit
for custody of their daughter. "Her
father is failing out of a community
college," Ireland said.
She also said Cashen thought that
Marandacould be betterraised by blood
relatives - Smith and his mother,
Maranda's paternal grandmother, who
does not work outside the home.
Miriam Razado, assistant director
of family housing, said the University
tries very hard to provide a supportive
environment for the often non-tradi-
tional families that reside in the North
Campus facilities.
"It's a struggle (to raise a child
withoutaspouse), butitcan bedone, so
we're very supporting of single-parent
families," Razado said. "The majority
of our residents are married, but that's
not always the case."
Su-Fan Lin, manager of Children's
Services, said Maranda was receiving
care through alicensed provider within
Family Housing's HomeCareprogram,
whichiscomparabletohavingatrained,
licensed babysitter.
"It seems to me that (Ireland) tried
her best to place her daughter in i-
censedcare,"Linsaid,adding that many
student parents are unable to find such
qualitycareduetofinancialconstraints.
Religious
Services
ANN ARBOR CHRISTIAN REFORMED CHURCH
1717 Broadway (near N. Campus)
665-105
SUNDAY:
Traditional Service-9 a.m.
Contemporary Service- 11:15 a.m.
Evening Service- 6 p.m.
Complete Educational Program
Nursery Care Available at all services
FIRST UNITARIAN UNIVERSALIST CHURCH
1917 Washtenaw 665-6158
SUNDAY: Service - 9:15 a.m.
A Welcoming and Affirming Congregation
Reverend Kenneth W. Phiter
HURON VALLEY COMMUNITY CHURCH
Gay-Lesbian Ministry 741-1174
LUTHERAN CAMPUS MINISTRY
LORD OF LIGHT LUTHERAN CHURCH, ELCA
801 South Forest (at Hill)
SNA:Worship loam
John Rollefson, Campus Pastor 668-7622
ST. MARY'S STUDENT PARISH
(A Roman Catholic Community at U-M)
Corner William and Thompson St.
Across from Cottage Inn
Weekend Liturgies-MONDAY &
WEDNESDAY: 5:10 pm
FRIDAY: 12:10 pm
SUNDAY: 8:30 am, 10 am,
12 noon, and 5 pm
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
1151 Washtenaw (near Hill Street)
Summer Schedule
SUNDAY: Worship 9:30am
WEDNESDAY: Supper & Devotion 6pm
Pastor Ed Krauss 663-5560
WELS LUTHERAN CAMPUS MINISTRY
Redeemer Lutheran Church
1360 Pauline Boulevard
Sunday Worship, 9:30AM
Robert Hoepner, Pastor
662-0663

TUmON
Continued from page 1
portion oftheincrease goes to financial
aid, students should still be able to
afford a university education. Of the
funding generated by the tuition hike,
18.3 percent will go toward increasing
financial aid.
"We have always tried to match the
increase in tuition with an increase in
financial aid," Whitaker said.
Duderstadt said students who can-
not afford to attend the University can
benefit through increases in financial
aid.
"The real price-the tuition minus
the average financial aid - has held
steady and has actually dropped a bit,"
he said. "Itsreally asking students and
parents to carry a little more of the
weight because they aren't in terms of
taxes, but someone has to pay."
Of the budget increase, 34.2 per-
cent will be used to funda 2.5-percent
average salary increase for faculty and
administrators.
The University expects each col-
lege to raise faculty salaries even fur-
ther through cost-cutting measures. It
will also use part of the increase to pay
for rising benefits costs.
AssociateProvostRobertHolbrook
said the University is "putting pressure
on each unit to economize."
Holbrook added that such a large
portion ofthe revenue generatedby the
tuition increase funds salary boosts be-
cause of the high cost involved in rais-
ing faculty compensation. To raise all
salaries one percentage point costs ap-
proximately $4 million.
Senate Advisory Committee on
University Affairs Chair Jean Loup
"When In Rome"
The Italian Barber
Dascola's
615 E. Liberty Off State
M-F 8:30-5:20 Sat til 4:20
Even The Godfather Recommends Us
SELF-SERVE
COPIES
REG. COPIESC
20# White, 8.5x11
" Collate _
SStapleWo-sided
" High Speed MTE
Dollar Bill
C®PYI NG
611 Church Street
n the acade above Rick's
Phone: 665-9200 Fax: 930-28000

said that while she is pleased with the
salary increase, she feels the individual
colleges may suffer from the pressure
to make cutbacks.
"I think it provides a real hardship
for the units which have to come up
with something to cut," she said. "The
University is better positioned (than its
peer institutions) for moving forward
and we all have to pay for that."
Loup said although she understands
the burden that accompanies rising tu-
ition, "You do what you have to do to

maintain thequality of the University."
Outgoing Chair of the Committee
for the Economic Status of the Faculty
John Tropman said he had mixed feel-
ings about thehike.Whilehe was happy
to receive a raise, he has a son who
attends the University.
"I think we are getting to the top of
the tuition. We don't want a tuititg
higher than people can pay," he said.'T
feel as a parent I have got tremendous
value from the University of Michigan
education I am paying for."

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