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May 05, 1993 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily Summer Weekly, 1993-05-05

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Wednesday, May 5, 1993 - The Michigan Daiy Summer Weekly -3
University receives
funding to advance
TV technology
By JEI tM SI

By JEN DIMASCIO
DALY NEWS ED TOR
In the year2000, a television that
hangs on the wall may replace the
one that sits on the floor, thanks in
part to a combination of grants and
aid from the state and federalgovern-
ments and Guardian Industries.
Monday, a $120 million plan to
create a new Center for High Defmi-
tionDisplay Technologiesandapro-
duction plant in Northville which
will assist the development of flat
panel displays was announced.
Officials said flat panel displays,
used now in the military and for
laptop computers, are expected to
replace currenttelevisionscreen tech-
nology by the end of the decade.
The University will receive $20
million to establish the center using
existing facilities at the Environmen-
tal Research Institute onNorth Cam-
pus.
The program will conduct re-
search and development of active
matrix liquid displays (AMLCD).
AMLCDs are flat crystals which
form flat panel displays when fused
together.
Engineering School Dean Peter
Banks said the center will allow the
University to import 50 masters de-
gree candidates. Banks said the En-
gineering school will attract engi-
neers displaced by military spending
cuts in the aerospace industry and
actively recruit students.
Mike Elta, aprofessor inthe Elec-
trical Engineering andComputer Sci-
:nce department, said the recruiting
process should be easy. He said hav-
ng the department will make stu-

dents more marketable in the work-
place.
"We've had three people walk in
offthestreetsalready,"Eltasaid,"Stu-
dents will perceive it as the place to
be."
Elta said the students he hopes to
recruit will have a strong background
with semi-conductors and control
theory.
Regent Rebecca McGowan (D-
AnnArbor)praisedtheproposalasan
enormousopportunity for theUniver-
sity.
"I'mparticularly excited about the
amount of emphasis the College of
Engineering placed on student in-
volvement," McGowan said.
Flat panel displays are low-tech,
high resolution television screens.
AMLCDsreplace television's cathod
ray tubes to make clearer pictures.
Flat panel displays use AMLCDs to
replace the standard television's cath-
ode ray tubes.
The United States imports flat
panel displays primarily for laptop
computers and aircraft controls.
01$ is the only American coin-
pany currentlyproducingthe screens.
The screens are produced primarily
by Japanese companies.
Officials say this is why they in-
tend to invest the $120 million to
begin production in America
Sen. Don Riegle (D-Mich.) said
the plant represents the country's first
venture into a team mentality. Riegle
said Japanese companies work in co-
operation on all levels in govemment
whereas United States. industries of-
ten work in solitude.
"We can't be islands among our-
selves," Riegle said.

'VA Pr E/ i
University President James Duderstadt (left) and Gov. John Engler exchange greetings at the
announcement of OIS's new TV research project. Engineering Dean Peter Banks looks on.
SUNY hires University s Associate
*Vice President for Academic Affairs

By JEN DIMASCIO
OSLY NEWS MOR
By midummer, the office of Aca-
demic Affairs will be accepting job
applications for the position of Asso-
ciate Vice President.
Last week, Mary Ann Swain, the
University's Associate Vice Presi-
dent for Academic Affairs, was se-
lected as the provost and vice presi-
dent for academic affairs for the State
University of New York at
Binghamton.
"I'm very excited. It's a great op-
portunity andafine institution,"Swain
said.
Swainbeganher careerattheUni-
versity in 1970 in the Schoolof Nurs-
ing. She attained tenure as a Nursing
professorsevenyearslaterandmoved
tohercurrentadministrative position
in 1983.
University President James Dud-
erstadt said Swain has been an excel-
lent employee.
"While we are very sorry to lose
her, we realize that someone with her
talents and abilities will seek higher
challenges and this is one such chal-
lenge," Duderstadt said in a press
relase.
Swainheldhigh parting praise for

the University.
LindaSpear,chairofBinghamton's
search comnmittee, said shechose Swain
from a field of 100 candidates. Spear
said she was impressed by Swain's
background and professional de-
meanor.
"I'm sorry Michigan had to lose
her, but I'm real excited," she said.
Spear said the search for a provost
at Binghamton began last September
when the position was vacated by Pete
Wagner - an electrical engineering
professor who retired from adminis-
trative activities to return to academia.
Swain'shusband, AssociateDirec-
tor of Admissions Donald Swain, will

also be leaving the University to move
to New York

Swain

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