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May 19, 1993 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily Summer Weekly, 1993-05-19

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Wednesday, May 19, 1993- The Michigan Daiy Summer Weekly -3
Renovations place a pretty
V 71face on an UGL building

By LAURA CAPIRIS
FOR THE DALY
The eyesore on the south edge of
the Diag willibe healed in spring 1995.
The Undergraduate Library, or the
UGLi as it is affectionately called, is
undergoing a much needed facelift-
its first renovation since 1956.
The extensive project includes the
addition of a unified science library on
the UGLi's third and fourth floors, an
expansion of the existing building and
the addition of catwalks linking the
UGLi to the West Engineering Build-
ing and the Harlan Hatcher Graduate
Library (Grad).
On Monday, workers began to lay
the foundation for the bridge connect-
ing the science library's third floor to
the Grad's second floor. Another en-
closed bridge will connect the Science
Library to West Engineering's fourth
floor.
Because the project is so extensive,
there is a risk that the noise would
damage the students' ability to con-

centrate in the UGLi.
Jack Weigel, science library coor-
dinator, said an agreement has been
made that all excessively loud work
must be completed before 3 p.m. on
each work day to avoid disturbing stu-
dents who will be permitted to use the
library's facilities throughout the con-
struction period.
"The major change willbe to create
a space in the building for central cam-
pus science library materials," said
Barbara MacAdam, UGLi director.
"The UGLi will actually become
two libraries in one with the UGLi
collection kept on the first and second
floors and the unified science collec-
tion on the third and fourth floors,"
said Dean of University Libraries
Donald Riggs.
Daisy Wu, head of basic science
and engineering libraries, said there
will be a sense of leaving one library
and entering another as library visitors
exit the stairwell or elevator and enter
the third floor of the new Science Li-

brary.
Currently, the science-related ma-
terials are housed in separate build-
ings. The Physics, Chemistry, Math-
ematics and Natural Science Depart-
ments individually house their own
resources.
"One of the disadvantages of the
separate departmental libraries is that
they are running out of space, forced to
compete with classrooms and labs,"
Wu added. "The new Science Library
will accommodate their continual
growth and expansion."
Due to staff cuts, reference person-
nel are now thinly dispersed across the
campus. By consolidating the librar-
ies, there will be one well-staffed sci-
ence library, offering increased sup-
port services for students, Weigel said.
The total cost of the project is esti-
mated at $11 million of which $6.85
million is to be funded by the sale of
bonds. Grants and donations are ex-
pected to fund the remainder. An in-
crease in tuition is not anticipated.

HEATHER LOWMANIDaiy
Workers loosen and peel bricks from the east side of the UGU in
preparation for expansion of the building.

Scholars debate religious and ethnic strife in India

Speakers criticize
lack of unity; stress
need for dialogue
By PETER MATTHEWS
DA LY STAFF REPORTER
The December riots that followed
the destruction of a 16th century
mosque and the consequences such
religious and ethnic strife could have
on India's future were concems that
brought six speakers and an audience
of several hundred to Rackham Audi-
torium last Thursday.
Morethan 1,000peoplewerekilled
and several thousand injured in the
aftermath of the obliteration of a 464-
year-old Ayodhya mosque in the In-
dian state of Uttar Pradesh. Approxi-
mately4,000 Hindunationalists,claim-
lag the mosque covered the birthplace
of their god Rama, leveledit with hand
tools.
India's population, which is near-
ing 900 million, is 83 percent Hindu
and 11 percent Muslim. There are also
numerous Christians, Sikhs and
Buddists.Rivalries between the groups
couldhavegraveramifications for this
country which was constituted as an
independent democratic republic in
1950.
Hindu and Muslim speakers who
attended the Thursday symposiumm -
"Ind: One Dre, One Dcstiny" -
criticized what they considerd politi-
cally motivated violence in a country
that should be proud of its religious and
ethnic diversity.

Azml
Most speakers said that the current
sectarian animosities result from po-
litical and economic inequality, Brit-
ish colonialism and hate mongering
for political ends.
"Bringing religion into the debate
is misleading and destructive," Prof.
Deba Patnaik of the Residential
College's African and African-Ameri-
can Studies said.
Dr.A.Raheman Nakadarthepresi-
dent of the American Federation of
Muslims from India, said that those
who incited the "communal rioting
hadtheulteriormotiveofgaining power
and thereby destroying a beautiful cul-
tural mosaic."
Dr.,JawaidQuddus, the U.Sree-
sentative of a Bombay company, said'
"'he problem has been created by the
leaders for vestedinterests, we are one,
we must unite and fight the forces that
seek to divide the country. We have to
defeat the fascists, because if we don't
you'll see what's happening in Bosnia
but a thousand times worse."
One of the political organizations

thatwascondemnedaspurposelydivi-
sive by the speakers was the Bharatiya
Janata Party. This Hindu party heads
the provincial government in Uttar
Pradesh and has been using virulently
sectarianrhetorictoconsolidateapower
base.
Madhav Deshpande, a professor of
Asian Languages andCultures,recently
returned from India. He spoke of a
Religious
Services
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political slogan written on a city wall
that read, "The only place in India for
Muslimsis they eithergotoPakistan or
to the cemetary."
Shabana Azmi, a renown Indian
actressofMuslimdescent,said, "Secu-
larism as a belief has to be articulated
as vehemently as communialism. We
must condemn majority and minority

communialism with equal fervor as
bothreinforce oneanotherintoasnow-
ball effect."
Indians, Azmisaid,"Donot know
enough about each other so we tend to
create monsters of one another. We
must enter into dialogue. India can
only march into the 21st century ... if
she is a secular democratic society."

Compare & GIORGIO ARMANI
Save! alau
POLICE
FOR YOUR
EYE EXAMS & EYEGLASSES
320 S.State St.
(Located in the Lower Level of
Richardsonis Drugs)
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Student Discounts! Wed.& Sat. 9am - 1pm

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