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June 03, 1992 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily Summer Weekly, 1992-06-03

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Wednesday, June 3,1992 - The Michigan Daily Summer Weekly - 3

Sunny side up
Sergio Andrade, a recent MBA graduate, enjoys the week's first rays of sun on the Diag yesterday. It is his
last afternoon on campus before returning to his home in Brazil.

Poor economy
stirs overseas
job market
by Rachel Katz The Peace Corps is one of man
Daily Staff Reporter programs offering students experienc
ThirtyyearsafterJohnF.Kennedy's abroad. Jeannine Lorenger, intemz
dedication of the Peace Corps on the tional opportunities advisor for thetI
Michigan Union steps, recent Univer- ternational Center, said more studen
sity graduate AndreaAthanas is excited are looking into these programs.
to participate in the vision. "I'm not sure whether the increas
"I am interested in gaining an un- is because wordisspreadingandpeop
derstanding of another culture while are hearing about these opportunitie
helping the people of that nation gain or because of the job market, or both
skills needed to excel in the modern she said.
world," she said. The number of available program
Athanas-whomajoredinEnglish has been rising to meet this increase
andEconomics-leavesnextweek for demand. The flurry of changes in Eas
Hungary, where she will teach English em Europe has spurred a new setc
to middle school and high school stu- programs in the former Soviet Bloc.
dents. "New ones are springing up evea
She said her decision to join the day," Lorenger noted. Education ft
Peace Corps was basedon aninterestin Democracy,forexample,sendsAmer
developing nations and a lack ofsatis- cans to Czechoslovakia to teach E
faction with more traditional career glish.
options. She farstbecame interested in
theeconomicconditionsofThirdWorld I'm not sure whether the
countries while writing a paperon Ni- increase is because word
geria for an economics course. This is readingand pople
interest guided her when she began her
quest for a job. are hearing about these
"I started in the process at Career opportunities, or becauSo
Placement and was pretty set on it," of the Job maket, or both
Athanas said. "But I didn't find any- -.Jeannine Lorenge
thing that suited me, that was genune. international opportunitie
She said the Peace Corps offered a advis
different type of opportunity.
In addition to the Peace Corps, she
considered the Teach for America pro- "One of the easiest jobs is teachi
gram, which assigns graduates to teach English, because you can do it with
in American school districts that have B.A. and no other experience," sa
trouble attracting and retaining teach- Lorenger. She added that the Overse
ers. Opportunity center organized fo
The application and interview pro- workshops this past year on teachi
cess took close to a year and a half, English overseas.
Athanas said. She said she was origi- Students in professional fields c
nally assigned to Albania, and that she also find a niche overseas, Loreng
was somewhat relieved when her as- noted, pointing to a video designed f
signment was changed. students in Public Health. Athanas sa
"Things in Albania are so chaotic that the Peace Corps is looking f
now," she said. students with M.B.A.'s and those w
Athanas said she hoped the Peace a background in natural resources.
Corps will helpher "find apath to take With a more interconnected woa
and get experience." When she returns economy,overseas opportunities co
in two years, Athanas said that she be thewaveof the future."Theeconor
would like to become a writer and do a is becoming a world market. We ha
lot of world traveling. to be open to the world," Athanas sa

ibraries lift hiringfreeze
by Maureen Little next year, said Gayle Ackley, a busi- them," Cohen said.
Daily Staff Reporter ness manager for Library Administra- CohensaidthatLibr
The University Library Personnel tive Services. goal was to protect pe
Officehaslifted its hiring freeze and is Ackley is partially responsible for already working. Them
now seeking students andstaff for em- allocating the budget for the libraries. freeze was to close 2
ployment positions. In planning for personnel, book bud- opened after permanen
The hiring freeze - which began gets,attritionandhourlywages,Ackley "Nobodywaslaid-o
winter term in the last half of the said that Administrative Services de- "We just didn't recruitf
University's fiscal year - was caused vised a plan to counter the possible tions."
by budget constraints. budget cuts. Other effects of th
The University Library Systemcon- "We were never certain that the cludedalossofworkers
sists of approximately 17 libraries and budget was going to be cut, sowehad to of hours.
is separate from the Law, Business and plan as if the money would not be "There were fewers
Clements libraries. there," Ackley said. could hire and less full-t
TheUniversity Library System was The Library System set aside a per- said John Powell, circa
asked to set aside 2.57 percent of its centage of its non-materials budget, sor at the Music Librar
$21,271,000 budget, due to possible which includes the wages for library Inaddition, the Assis
state funding cutbacks, said Robert personnel but excludes money used for Librarian position - o
Holbrook, associate vice-president for buying new books and other materials ary - will now be fill
academic affairs. for the libraries. "There was no cutb
About 43 percent of the budget for "Over a year's period, Library Per- number of) student hot
the libraries is obtained through state sonnel hires an estimated 1,000 work- the number of worker
funding.However,Holbrooksaid,"The ers," said Lucy Cohen, library person- The decrease in fundsv
exactpercentage ishard to tellbecause nelmanager.Cohensaidthatmosttem- percent cut in the stud
all funds for the Universityfm tu- poraryemployees work approximately added.
ition, the state, private donations, as 10-12 hotas per week and are Univer- 'The five percent ct
well as other sources, are pooled to- sity students. budget was a proportia
gether and then divided among depart- "Students are our priority as work- of the 2.57 percent fr
ments." ers. We couldn't function without library cut," Ackley sa
The University responded to signs
of trouble in Michiganbudget funding
by withholding a percentage ofeach of
its department's budgets. "The state
sent out warning signs that trouble with C 1 1N A D
funding was ahead," Holbrook said. SZECHUAN, HUNAN &t PEKING CUISIF
While the hiring freeze was tempo- 1. RATED No.1 in Carry Out Service by The Ann Arbo
rary and has now been lifted, the Li- 2. Selected the Best Chinese Restaurant by the Michig
brarySystemwillfaceacutbackof2.57
percentfromtheMichigangovernment Of f
Hair Styling with Dinner and Carry-Out Meni
a Flair Expires June 15, 1992
" 6 Barber Stylists
Ifor MEN & WOMEN
- NO WAITING!!! RESERVATIONS, 971-0970
DASCOLA STYLISTS 33MWetenaw Avenue' Ann Arbor, MI48104
66p -9329 j'Open7DsAWe.k 11:30 .m.- p.m.

ary Personnel's
ople who were.
ainaffectofthe
20-30 positions
t workers left.
ff,"Cohensaid,
for vacant posi-
he cutbacks in-
and areduction
students that we
time positions,"
ulation supervi-
y.
stant tothe Head
pen since Janu-
ed.
ack on (the total
ars but a cut on
s,' Powell said.
was due to a five
dent budget, he
ut in the student
onate reflection
om the overall
id.

iy
e
a-
n-
its
use
le
as
ns
ed
st-
of
ry
or
ri-
ng
.
er,
es
or
ing
ta
aid
as
ur
tng
an
er
for
aid
for
ith
rld
uld
my
ve
id.

... RIUe

rt
NEw
r Noms
;an Daily
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01~

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