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May 13, 1988 - Image 4

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Publication:
Michigan Daily Summer Weekly, 1988-05-13

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Page 4 - The Michigan Doily - Friday, May 13, 1988
'U' raises Black
faculnumbers
BY VERONICA WOOLRIDGE hiring minority faculty a priority
The University has hired 12 new because of negative publicity from
Black faculty members - more than recent student protests against cam-
in any previous year - will pus racism, Morris said.
probably hire six more minorities, There is "no doubt that the social
and has 12 additional offers under protest in the spring this semester
negotiation, according to last has played a major role i n
month's Provost's report on the highlighting the extent of underrep-
minority affairs agenda. resentation of Blacks on campus," he
The names and departments of the said. "Social protest brought the is-
new employees, however, will not sue to the forefront of the campus,
be released until a later date, said the state of Michigan, and the na-
Mary Ann Swain, associate vice tion."
president for academic affairs. On April 17, a front-page article
Dr. Aldon Morris, associate pro- called "Campus Blacks Feel
fessor of sociology and a Black fac- Racism's Nuances" in the New York
ulty member, said the University Times focused on the University, as
should be commended for its efforts. did a 60-minute PBS Frontline doc-
But Morris said far more new mi- umentary aired Tuesday. The docu-
norities need to be hired and recruited mentary, Racism 101, depicted what
in order to "turn around the degree to Frontline Executive Producer David
which U of M's image has been tar- Fanning called, "a disturbing portrait
nished." of racism and prejudice among
THE UNIVERSITY has made young people."

Duderstadt
...initated Target of Oppor-
tunity program
After students protested racism on
campus in spring 1987, the Univer-
sity resolved to provide budgetary
incentives to attract and retain Black
See Faculty, Page 8

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HIGH SCHOOL -OR COLLEGE STUDENTS
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Equal Opportunity
Employer M/ F

Classes
Continued from Page 1
Gerson added that the material
taught in 401 is the same as that
taught during the year.
Prof. Peter Smith, who is co-
teaching organic chemistry this
term, agreed. "The material is
identical," he said. "It just comes at
you twice as fast because the class
lasts half as long."
"The material isn't less difficult,
it's just that the people are less
competitive," said LSA junior
Sharyn Daskal.
SOME professors say it is diffi-
cult to fit in all the material during
the shorter term, even though more
hours are added.
"There is no attempt at making
the class easier or harder. The num-
ber of problems and chapters as-
signed are the same," said accounting
Prof. Harold Arnett.
But while class hours are the
same as in the fal, Arnett added,the
finds it difficult to keep up with the
material.
Lemuel Johnson, a professor of
English literature, said he is nor-

City loses domestic
violence offcer grant
BY KRISTINE LALONDE arrest alleged domestic assailants if a
The State Appropriations Com- victim is clearly injured, and if they
mittee will not renew a federal grant find a weapon and probable cause.
for the city's special domestic vio- According to the law, the assault
lence detective for next year, despite victim need not decide whether to
pleas from the Ann Arbor City press charges immediately after the
Council. -crime. Other cities without the
The state body designed to mandatory arrest law only require
administer federal funds has $1.2 that the police officer use personal
million to cover the $2.6 million discretion in determining whether to
requested, said Sharon Miles, one of make an arrest.
Rep. Perry Bullard's (D-Ann Arbor) Kathy Edgren (D-5th Ward) said
assistants. the council has not decided what
The special officer is currently in steps to take to replace the federal
charge of all domestic violence funding. She said the police depart-
cases- assisting the victim, and ment was lucky to get the grant and
preparing reports for the local courts. it does not affect the law's imple-
The grant amount issued w a s mentation.
$26,394 and will end June 30. But Sue McGee of Ann Arbor's
WITHOUT a federal grant, the Domestic Violence Project said the
police department, City Council, and officer was crucial for implementing
City Administrator Godfrey Collins the law. She said only one person
must find another way to implement should handle cases so the officer can
the city's domestic violence law.
The law requires police officers to See Grant, Page 8
mally "ambivalent" about offering
classes spring term. S
"I'm not sure it allows for the
same degree of intense recognition
and reflection that one might nor- su rvey
mally get during the regular
semester," he added.
JOHNSON said he compensates Code 1s
for the shorter time span by stress-
ing general ideas and theories for
texts. concern
According to the Office of the
Registrar, 9,874 students stayed on BY MARGO GILBERT
to take spring classes last year. The Michigan Student Assembly
Generally, regular term four-credit recently released the results of its
classes become three credits in "20 Questions" campus-wide survey
spring and summer, and three-credit on students' opinions and awareness
classes become two. of University policies and services.
"Most courses are taught at re- "The main purpose behind the
duced credit, because faculty mem- survey is to find out what students
bers find it is too intense to do the are thinking about particular issues
whole course in the amount of time and what the level of awareness is
given," said Robert Wallin, director around these issues," said Sarah Ri-
of LSA Checkpoint counseling ser- ordan, MSA Student Rights Com-
vices. mittee chair.
LSA Associate Dean for Long The respondents said MSA should
Range Planing Jack Meiland said the give highest priority to the code,
College Curriculum Committee has racism, tuition, and off-campus
discussed evaluating the spring and housing - issues that MSA Presi-
summer courses. Meiland added that dent Mike Phillips said are already
he would like to see more courses the assembly's greatest concers.
that are traditionally hard to get into The majority of respondents op-
during the fall and winter terms of- posed an administrative code, Rior-
fered for spring and summer. dan said, "so that sends us a signal

l

ENJOY COMPLETE CURRICULUM
SAINT LOUIS UNIVERSITY'S IN ENGLISH, SPANISH
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SCIENCE, HISPANIC STUDIES
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SLU IS AN AA/EDE
Apply NOW for SUMMER & FALL!
INFORMATION:
L 1-800-325-6666
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In the classroom with more than 700 Spanish students.

to keep working against it."
Sixty eight percent of the
respondents said students should not
be punished academically "for non-
academic behavior a University ad-
ministrator finds out of line."
In addition, 22 percent of the stu-
dents said they thought financial dif-
ficulties would force them to leave
the University, and 92 percent fa-
vored 24-hour University transporta-
tion to and from North Campus.
Next fall MSA hopes to mail the
survey with University Student
Verification Forms in order to reach
more students. Students would be
able to drop them off at CRISP
when they register for classes.

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