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May 22, 1987 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily Summer Weekly Summer Weekly, 1987-05-22

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

The Michigan Daily-Friday, May 22, 1987- Page 5
Contest rates sexist advertisements

By KENT WAGNER
The Citizens Advisory Commit -
tee on Rape Prevention is currently
holding its third annual contest to
increase awareness on sexism in the
media.
The contest, entitled, "What if
They Were Selling a Woman and
No One Was Buying?" is intended
to "stop violence against women,
and encourage advertisers to pay
more attention to the impact they
have on attitudes," said Carol
McCabe, CACORP coordinator.
C A C O R P, a committee of
fifteen which includes two males,
selected five local and five national
advertisements from which the Ann
Arbor community will select the
most sexist.
Voting for the most sexist ad

ends today. The results will be an -
nounced June 1. The contest re
ceived 400 votes in each of the last
two years, and McCabe expects this
year's turnout to match that figure.
"The importance of the contest
is to show how the media reflects
and perpetuates our attitudes about
women," said contest organizer
Jennifer Akfirat.
CONTEST organizers said
that attitudes presented through the
media can lead to sexism, and in an
extreme form, rape. "If that attitude
is changed, then sexism and rape
will diminish," McCabe said.
There are five local finalists,
including Dagwoods, a restaurant in
the basement of the Michigan
Union. The eatery used the slogan,
"They say size doesn't matter" in

reference to the length of their subs.
Other finalists include a
fraternity rush poster depicting a
seductive, naked woman in high
heels hiding behind a Pi Lamda
banner, and a Vote-for-FLASH
poster displaying a flasher with a
big, mocking grin. The FLASH

marks like "Beer labels come off
without a fight", and "After you've
had a beer it's still worth ten
cents."
The last advertisement appeared
in an April issue of The Michigan
Daily. The ad attempted to attract
readers by saying, "Use us. We like

'I chose a sexual connotation because it's a current trend in
advertising. It captures the audience's eye and gets them to
remember.' - Mason Franklin,
Former Daily Business Manager

Franklin claimed that the adver -
tisement had a "sexual connotation,
not a sexist connotation."
"I CHOSE a sexual conno -
tation," he continued, "because it's
a current trend in advertising. It
captures the audiences' eye and gets
them to remember."
In a separate national compe -
tition, the five finalists include
advertisements for L'eggs, Calvin
Klein, Coca-Cola, and Miller beer.
Georges Marciano won last
year's competition with a two-
frame advertisement for Guess clo -
thing. McCabe said the winning
advertisement showed a man
carrying a woman over his shoulder
in the first frame and a woman with
her clothes open struggling to get
out of a car in the second frame.

party competed in the Michigan
Student Assembly election last
March.
ANOTHER finalist was a
flyer entitled "Why Beer is Better
than Women" which contained re -

it", "Take advantage of us. We want
you to", and "Pick us up. We're
easy".
According to Mason Franklin,
the Daily's former Business Mana -
ger, "They were not sexist at all."

Outdoor bars, patios
draw summer partiers

I I

By CHRIS BORRIS and
DAN COOKE
Spring is often considered a time
when young people's fancies turn
to thoughts of love, but many
University students think their fan -
cies turn to nothing but thoughts of
beer and parties.
Spring parties are different than
parties during regular terms. Many
students believe that since there are
fewer students in Ann Arbor during
spring, the atmosphere around cam -
pus is more "laid back."
LSA JUNIOR Adam Levine
said, "Summer partying is a
redundancy; summer is a party."
"All these people, they're either
pro-life, pro-this, or pro-that, but I
don't care - I'm pro-partying," he
added..
"Springtime in Ann Arbor is a
time when Fritz, a good friend of
mine, and I can sojourn, can
frequent the local gin joints or
parties, and enjoy a relaxing drink
together," said Kevin Wass, a recent
University graduate.
AN INVESTIGATION of
the campus area last Saturday
evening revealed that the summer
'U' grads find
success in
job market
(ContinuedfromPage 3)
from last December's class either
are employed or are planning to
attend graduate school.
Peggy Carroll, director of career
placement at the Business School,
boasts similar successes. "This has
been the best year the Business
School has seen sinee I came here
in 1980 - 130 out of 275 grad-
uates have already accepted jobs."

partying mood is in high-gear.
People wearing their best summer
tans and clothes flocked to the
streets headed to one party or
another.
At a party on Dewey Street,
many drunken, smiling faces were
found. People roamed in and out of
the house, most stopping to rest on
the porch and to contemplate the
scene.
Barney Klein, a resident of the
house and an Eastern Michigan
University communications major,
said, "Spring parties are more porch
style. You hear more reggae music
and you smell more body odor."
Although the latter thought was not
on everyone's mind, the warm
summerbreeze and idlerelaxation
on the porch formed the framework
of the summer house party
atmosphere.
Reggae nights and New-Music
nights held at the University Club
every Thursday and Friday nights,
respectively, have grown in
popularity since the start of spring
term. Held on the patio of the
Michigan Union, the outdoor
atmosphere draws large crowds.

Daily Photo by DANA MENDELSSOHN
Cartful of kids
Lee Gallagher of the Jack and Jill Toddler Center pulls five children from the center in a six-seater wagon
outside of Kerrytown.

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