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May 13, 1984 - Image 5

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1984-05-13

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The Michigan Daily - Sunday, May 13, 1984 - Page 5
'Angels' patrol Northwestern

Guardian Angels, wearing red berets
and white T-shirts are now patroling
the campus of Northwestern Univer-
sity.
The chapter at Northwestern was
started by students in March 1983 after
an Angels chapter was opened in the
city of Evanston, Ill., said D'Arcy
Rahming, chapter coordinator at Nor-
thwestern.
Including new students, the North-
western chapter has 25 members,
Rahming said. They walk around cam-
pus in groups of two or more and their
major purpose, he said, "is visual
COLLEGES
deterrence of crime and to let people
know we care."
Anyone can belong to the group, he
added. "You don't have to be built like a
football player or Bruce Lee. You just
have to be an average person."
The Guardian Angels carry no
weapons and concern themselves only
with crimes such as muggings, rape
and assault. When a student or anyone
joins the Angels, Rahming said, he or
she goes through a two-month training
program. They take courses in CPR,
self-defense and the technicalities of
citizen's arrest, he said.
-The Daily Vidette
Mass. student tree-sits
Richard Barrett can't understand
why more people don't want to enroll at
the Stockbridge School of Agriculture,
and it's driven him right up a tree.
Barrett, a 23-year-old landscape
operations major, climbed a tree in
front of his fraternity house last week
and said he would stay in the tree for a
week to try to spark some interest in the
"wide range of educational oppor-
tunities" his school offers.
"I plan to do homework, reading, and
maybe a little pruning, perhaps,"
Barrett said.
Enrollment has declined at the two-
year school affiliated with the Univer-
sity of Massachusetts because people
are not aware that agriculture is a wide
open field, Barrett said. The school is
ripe with opportunities in turf
management, animal agriculture,
agribusiness and landscaping, he said.
"If one person comes to Stockbridge,
I guess that's successful," said the
anything but out-of-his-tree senior.
-Associated Press
Harvard reopens
discrimination case
Harvard's business school may
reopen a case of . alleged
discrimination during an interview by a
Wall Street firm in the wake of student
demands that the firm be banned from
on-campus recruiting for one year.
Administrators proposed that the
school evaluate charges made by a
black second-year student that a
Merrill Lynch Company recruiter
questioned him unnecessarily about his
minority status in a recent interview, a
school official said.
Merrill Lynch has already conducted
an investigation which confirmed most,
but not all, of the student's accusations,
said Thomas Smith, the legal counsel
for Merrill Lynch.
The Company has also agreed to
tighten its recruiting policy and fine the
interviewer, but the student insisted
that further action be taken.

Smith said that Merrill Lynch has in
the past been accused of
discrimination, but never in an em-
ployment interview such as this.
-The Harvard Crimson
La. school gets a new name
You can be forgiven if you've never
heard of the University of
Louisiana-it's not yet two weeks old.
And already its days seem numbered.
The University of Louisiana was
known, until quite recently, as the
University of Southwestern Louisiana.
Many here have believed for some time
that it aspires to be more than a
regional institution giving up its best

was WGNR at the Grand Rapids
School of the Bible and Music with a fir-
st place in sports play-by-play.
UPI College Broadcast Awards are
judged by a panel of broadcast
professionals. All entries are required
to be voiced, produced and presented
by undergraduate or graduate students
enrolled in an accredited U.S. college or
university that subscribes to one or
more of UPI's broadcast services.
- United Press International
Ill. museum dons darts .
When Moby Dick turns into Moby
Dart and Darth Vader becomes Dart
Vader, just remember it's all part of a

sharp art show, Objects D'Dart.
"It's a rather informal exhibit," said
Evert Johnson, the amused curator at
the University Museum at Southern
Illinois University. "It's all kinds of
tongue-in-cheek."
"The display of dart-art was the idea
of metalsmith graduate student H.
Charles Schwarz. Metalsmiths,
glassblowers and blacksmiths were in-
vited to participate in the exhibit.
The Objects D'Dart, about 90 in all,
are made of glass, wood, aluminum,
megnesium, steel, paper, bronze,
peacock feathers, cork, rope, hair,
bamboo, silicone, cloth-and the list
goes on.
The darts' names are as varied as
their components. There are, for
example, the Winged Narwhale dart,
the Spiral Nebulous dart, and the
Rliquary of St. Leoparini, who, the
exhibit declares, is "the patron saint of
the snail darter."
Johnson said there are "a lot of stuf-
fed shirts" who might look down on
such a show. But the pointed criticism
doesn't bother him.
"I think we can get too serious too
long sometimes," he said. "There's
some room for humor, too."
--Associated Press
Compiled by Daily staff writer
Michael Beaudoin.

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Phone 764-0558

JAMES CHAPLIN/Daily

graduate students to Louisiana State
University in Baton Rouge.
Two weeks ago, its administrators
asked the Louisiana Board of Trustees
for State Colleges and Universities for
permission to drop the word "South-
western," which they said gave the in-
stitution a "provincial-sounding name"
that made recruiting good faculty
members difficult.
Ignoring threats from a state senator
and protests from Louisiana State
University's counselor, who showed up
uninvited at the trustees' meeting to
denounce the plan, the board approved
the change. But there are currently
three bills in the state legislature at-
tacking the change and officials say the
chances it will stick are "dismal."
-The Chronicle of
Higher Education
UPI honors radio stations
United Press International has an-
nounced the winners of the second an-
nual UPI College Broadcast Awards
Program.
For the second straight year, radio
station WOCR at the State University of
New York, Oswego, has received more
than one award in the national contest.
WOCR swept first place awards in the
sports show, newscast, and spot news
categories and tied for first place for
features. Last year the station received
three awards in the documentary and
newscast categories.
The only Michigan station recognized

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