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May 08, 1984 - Image 9

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1984-05-08

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Classical pieces in
tune for local peaces
ficiently strong tone quality of her voice
By Lou Fintor couple with a good balance of in-
strumentals.
M ICHIGAN UNION'S Pendleton Hargis tackled the technically dif-
Room was alive with the sounds fcult upper-range transitions and firm
of Bach, Handel, and LeClair this vibratos with the relative ease and self-
weekend as several local musicians assurance of one who is destined for
showcased their talents in a "Benefit bigger things.
i fo Pece"tha wil ai tw loal on- Similarly, Sarah Sumner and Daniel
for Peace that will aid two local con- Foster gave strikingly cohesive per-
cerns - the Ann Arbor Nuclear Freeze formance of Jean-Marie LeClair's
and Medical Aid for El Salvador. for To Vilnsain D eMajr
Unfortunately it isn't too often that Sona for woeViolins in D Major s
one can both enjoy a well-done classical Their unique interpretation of this
recital and yet at the same time have piece and proper balance left the
the satisfaction of contributing to a audience with a feeling that the two
worthy cause. Those who attended violins were but one.
Saturday's recital, however, were of- Highlighting the evening, Har-
fered just that unique opportunity. psichordist Barbara Weiss captivated
Overall, the program provided a well- in the classical tradition by leading the
balanced smorgasbord of chamber program with two pieces - one
music with local Soprano Ellen Hargis familiar, one somewhat obscure.
giving the evening's most noteworthy Contrasting Bach with Frogerger,
performace by far. she mastered the keyboard with an air
In a truly professional rendition of of confidence. Violoncellist Enid
three songs by Handel, Hargis proved Sutherland is also worth mention for
that a good vocalist can indeed over- her performance of Bach's six-
come weighty instrumentals to achieve movement Suite in D Major for Solo
a satisfying classical blend. Cello - although it would perhaps have
The spiritual quality of these pieces been better to mix the program as the
was enhanced by the light, yet suf- movements became somewhat
monotonous.
The jury says guilty

The Michigan Daily - Tuesday, May 8, 1984 - Page 9
Meet ... Slash Recording Artists
VIOLENT
F EMMES
WEDNESDAY, MAY 9 AROUND 5:30 P.M.
AT SCHOOLKIDS' 523 E. Liberty
'7

Ahhh! The smell of spring, and with it
free time to kick up your feet and relax
What to do with the extra hours - go
to museums, read a good book? No, in
our house free time means TV time. At
least until last Sunday night it did. What
forced us out of the lazy boy recliners?
A television show called "You Are the
Jury."
The ads made it sound good because the
television audience could call in their
decision - guilty or not guilty - in a re-
enacted court case. Kind of made us
feel like part of the NBC family, calling
up and being on the jury.
At the beginning of "You Are the
Jury" the viewer was told that Joe
(what washis last name?) was on trial
for the first degree murder of his wife's
lover. Joe's defense lawyer made him
seem like a real nice guy - har-
dworking, clean cut (y'know they type
of guy who drives a Chevy and loves
apple pie).
The prosecutor said a few irrelevent
words in cross-examination, then the
viewers at home were urged to call in
their verdicts. That didn't make a lot of
sense to us, since the prosecutor hadn't
even presented his case yet. What kind
of people would call in a verdict at that
point, and what would their reasoning
be?
"I dunno George, he seems like a
cleancut kid - nice tie ... Nnnnyeah, I
think he's innocent." Or perhaps,
"Edna, I say it's tails he's guilty."
At the end of the show, what we
though was a simple whodunit
mushroomed into an insanity trial. Af-
ter the prosecution presented its case, it
was clear that Joe had committed the
murder.
The question then became: Was Joe
insane when he fired the gun? The show
dealt with this now all important
question for perhaps 10 minutes. When
the defense and prosecution finished
their summaries, NBC provided the
viewer 60 seconds to decide whether
Joe was not guilty by reason of insanity,
and to call up the station.
When there was no evidence to make

an educated decision they gave you all
day to call, after you realized what the
trial was really about they just closed
up shop. No apple pie, no Chevrolet, no
nothing.
As for NBC's message, it seemed sort
of warped - something like "Remem-
ber viewers, you may be a juror in a
real court case, so call in now with your
gut reaction, don't worry about the
evidence, just call."
Sorry NBC, now we're the jury -
your show is guilty by reason of
stupidity.
See ya at the museum.
- Mike Fisch and
Norman Zavela
INDIVIDULTHEATRES
DAILY 1:00 P M SHOWS
$1 50 TUESDAY ALL DAY
EXUBERANT!
GOLDIE
H AWN
LAST 9 DAYS!
ACA DEYANNA RD
MIOU MIOU
ISABELLE
HUPPERT
(R)
DAILY 1:00, 7: 20,9:30

Slash Records releases the new Violent Femmes
LP and cassette, "Hallowed Ground" Monday,
May 14. Bring in this ad for the Special sale price
of $5.99.
O e e

VIOLENT FEMMES IN CONCERT WED. NIGHT
AT MICHIGAN UNION BALLROOM, 8 P.M.
Tickets on Sale at Schoolkids' Records

I

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