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July 24, 1984 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1984-07-24

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

A rt Fair 184 ^Inside:Aguidetothe
summer's main event
rtb torzu ILIUdIQ
Ninety -four years of editorial/freedom

Tuesday, July 24, 1984

Fifteen Cents

Sixteen Pages

Williams forfeits
crown over
nude photos

CAROL L. FRANCAVILLA/Daily
The Graceful Arch on East University was almost vacant yesterday, but it
will soon be overtaken by swarms of people visiting Ann Arbor's 25th annual
art fair.
Preparations for art
fair hit fever pitch

By ANDREW ERIKSEN
The familiar assemblage of art
booths, music stages, knockwurst
stands, and bargain sales are begin-
ning to take shape in the city today
as preparations continue for
tomorrow's opening of the art fair.
Local merchants and workers
stacked the sections that make up
the art booths last night along South
University, and construction of the
booths should start this morning.
The construction and the installation
of the white plastic roofs and elec-
trical lines will take most of the day,
and the artists should be able to
move into the booths later tonight.
MOST OF the hotels in the down-
town area are booked solid for the
fair. Many people make reser-
vations a year in advance for the an-
nual ritual, according to Deanna
Dean, who works at the Ann Arbor
Inn.
Visitors trying to get into town
may find it a little more difficult
this year because of the road constr-
uction along Plymouth Road and
State Street during the fair. Patrons
may want to use the Ann Arbor-
Saline road exit off I-94 or the
Washtenaw Ave. exit off U.S. 23, ac-
cording to Ann Arbor police.
People who come to Ann Arbor to
look at artwork during the fair will

be treated to a spruced-up Univer-
sity campus. Robert Hanselmann, a
general service foreman, said the
University has constructed ramps
on some side streets to help artists
and vendors load and unload their
goods. In addition to adding wood
chips underneath some bushes along
South University, cutting the grass
inside the Law Quad, and trimming.
the bushes near Helen Newberry
residence hall, the grounds depar-
tment plans to shut off the sprinkler
system during the art fair.
"WE DON'T want to give any of the
displays a bath at 11 o'clock at
night," said Hanselman. The
University will have to put in an ex-
tra effort during the fair to control
the trash problem, he added.
People setting up the booths aren't
the only ones working late - many
artists in the fair are also busy.
Many need to "replace" work that
was sold at other fairs around the
country.
"We're working like mad," said
artist Neal Wright, who will be
displaying his work in the Ann Arbor
Street Fair. Wright added that most
visitors don't show up before the fair.
People are more particular and just
looking the first day and coming
back and buying the second, said
See MERCHANTS, Page 7

By DAVID VANKER
with wire reports
Vanessa Williams reluctantly gave
up her Miss America title yesterday,
saying Penthouse magazine's
publication of sexually explicit photos
of her and another woman made it im-
possible for her to finish her reign.
The 21-year-old beauty, the first
black woman to hold the title and the
first of 57 Miss Americas to lose the
crown, told a packed Manhattan news
conference she never agreed to have
the pictures published and did not
realize how explicit they were until she
saw them in the magazine.
"IT IS apparent to me that because of
all that has happened during the past
week, it would be difficult for me to
make an appearance as Miss
America," Williams said in a calm
voice.
She said her mistake was "almost
totally devastating to have to share
with the American public and the world
at large."
The 10-page layout in the September
Penthouse, rushed to newsstands a
week early yesterday and selling for $4
instead of the usual $3, showed
Williams posing nude in several
sexually suggestive scenes with an
unidentified woman.
IN ANN ARBOR, Community
Newscenters held a monopoly over
sales of the issue yesterday while other
local retailers anxiously awaited their
mid-week shipments.
"I think we'll get a special order on
Wednesday - probably more copies
than normal," said a spokesperson for
Marshall's.
A clerk at Tice's reported that the
store did not receive its copies of the
September issue yesterday, but said
"we were kind of hoping we would. We
had about 50 people ask for it."
CAROL DAVIS of the Community
Newscenter on South University con-
firmed that sales of the magazine were
brisk.
"We're not sold out yet, but I imagine
we will be soon," she said last night.
"It's been selling very fast. I've been,
here for two or three hours and we've
sold 20 or 30 copies."
But not everyone who came in was in-
terested in owning the magazine, Davis
added.
"PEOPLE are obviously looking for
that issue," she said. "Some are
looking through it and deciding not to
buy it.

. On the opposite corner of campus, the
East Liberty Community Newscenter
was enjoying a comparable sales boom.
"It's incredible," remarked Kim
Hanafee, a Newscenter clerk. "We
probably overstocked, but they're
selling like hotcakes. People are buying
two or three."
Hanafee.said most of the customers
sympathized with Williams but could
not contain their curiosity.
"Everybody's on (Williams') side,"
Hanafee said. "They seem to think
(Penthouse publisher) Bob Guccione is

Williams
... relinquishes title
cruel and sadistic, and they hope
(Williams) will make a lot of money af-
ter it's over.
"Nevertheless, they are buying it,"
she said. "They want to see her, but
they don't agree with it."
In Atlantic City, N.J., pageant of-
ficials said Suzette Charles, Miss New
Jersey, would serve the remainingtwo
months as Miss America. Charles is
also black.
Inside:
* Israel held key elections
yesterday. See Page3.
" Opera comes to Ann Arbor.
See Arts, Page 10.
" The Olympics are political -
even without the Soviets. See
Sports, Page 16.
Outside :
Partly cloudy with a chance of
thunderstorms and a high in the
Low to mid-80s.

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