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July 20, 1984 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1984-07-20

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Troopers
fail to find
kidnappers
in Montana
mountains
BIG SKY, Mont. (AP) - Members of
an assault team armed with high-
technology equipment searched the
roadless Spanish Peaks area from
helicopters yesterday in the hunt for
two wilderness-wise mountain men who
allegedly kidnapped a woman athlete to
get a bride and killed a man searching
for her.
But the 11-member team returned to
base after eight hours without finding a
trace of Don Nichols, 53, and his 19-
year-old son, Dan.
AUTHORITIES said the two men,
who have roamed the mountains for
years, may be living in a cave.
The two vowed not to be taken alive
when they vanished into the timber
Monday morning after Alan Goldstein,
36, of Big Sky was shot to death. Gold-
stein was slain as he attempted to
rescue kidnap victim Kari Swenson of
Bozeman,
Swenson, 23, a member of the U.S.
women's biathlon team, was abducted
Sunday while jogging in the Big Sky
resort area several miles from the ran-
ch where she worked.
Authorities say Swenson, chained to a
tree, was shot in the chest by the
younger Nichols, apparently by ac-
cident, as Goldstein and another sear-
cher approached the Nicholses' camp.
She was hospitalized in Bozeman in
stable condition.
There was no indication why the
search was halted at 1 p.m.
If the two men are found, a hostage
negotiator will attempt to get them to
surrender, said Madison County Sheriff
Johnny France.
Twenty
men rape
Chicago
woman
CHICAGO (AP) - A 41-year-old
woman out walking with a friend was
abducted and held captive in a house
for 12 hours while as many as 20 men
raped and beat her before she fled
naked, police said yesterday.
The victim, who was abducted about
5 am. Wednesday near her North Side
apartment, told police that as many as
20 men took turns raping and at-
tacking her with chains and fists, and
burning her with cigarettes while four
young boys watched but did not par-
ticipate, said Detective William Mur-
phy.
Mark Foster, 17, who police said lives
in the house on the city's South Side
where the attack took place, and Edric
Jones, 20, were arrested Wednesday
and charged with aggravated criminal
sexual assault, Murphy said. Police
were looking for six other men named
by the four witnesses, he added.

The Michigan Dc
Wl' I- S A
l

aily - Friday, July 20, 1984 - Page 3
Protesters
march for
peace in
Central
America
By MARLA GOLD
Carrying banners that read
"Freedom for Nicaragua," and "Uncle
Sam - Hands off Central America,"
the Progressive Student Network
yesterday began a march to Detroit to
take part in a rally Saturday against
U.S. involvement in Central America.
There are more than 100 people who
are somehow affiliated with PSN, but
only six are participating in the march.
About 20 will join the pack by car on
Saturday at the rally site in Detroit.
Marchers explained that many people
aren't participating because of work
and other commitments.
THE MARCHERS contend that the
three-day walk will be a good time to
think about the situation in El Salvador
and Nicaragua, where the U.S. has
been supplying arms for the past few
years.
"We'll sing, talk, and reflect on the
U.S.'s involvement in Central
America," said marcher Tom Marx.
Yesterday also marked the fifth an-
See PSN, Page 4

PSN members David Miklethun, left, Liz Johnson, and Tom Marx begin a
three-day march yesterday to a Detroit rally against U.S. involvement in
Central America.

By
The who
in Michigz
some," sa
the Ann Ar
Research(
PIRGID
organizati
U.S. Distr
court to
present;
creates
against the
"WE
requireme
be certifi
register v'
regulation
city laws,'
"The en
cludes ma
their right
cluding th
handicapp
"Being
responsib
anybody t

Voter registration outdated
'MICHAEL NOWLIN Ann Arbor has had problems with an Gibbons said. "There are i
open deputy-registrar process," said as electing regents, that aff
le voter registration process Herb Katz, assistant city clerk. ts, especially those form out-
an is "archaic and cumber- "PEOPLE WOULD fill out the Gibbons said she believes
id Amy Gibbons, director for registrar's forms, think they were of student apathy is beg
'bor branch of Public Interest registered and go to vote, but find that change.
Groups in Michigan. nobody had bothered to turn in their "We've already registe
q is one of several forms," Katz stated. "We need 2,000 students, and hope to
ons that have filed suit in registrars who understand the impor- that number by making
ict Court in Flint, asking the tance and responsibility involved with freshmen aware of their im
order an overhaul of the the position." she said. "In the fall we'll be
system, charging that it One possible solution to the problem, visible all over campus - t
unconstitutional barriers according to Gibbons, would be to allow the visibility, the greater our
e right to vote, potential voters to fill out postcard or In addition to PIRGIM, t
(PIRGIM) oppose the newspaper registration forms. Agreed suing to overhaul the cur
nt that a deputy-registrar Katz, "Although I can't speak for the registration system are
ied by the city clerek to state, that would seem to be a viable American Voter Registrati
oters and want uniform state alternative in the future." t; Gray Panthers; JewishC
s, not helter-skelter, city-by- PIRGIM is part of an ongoing Council of Metropolitan De
" said Gibbons. nationwide campaign designed to in- Registration Project; Michi;
itire registration process ex- crease voter registration, focusing for a Barrier-Free Environn
ny segments of society from especially on students, a group long Michigan Citizens Lobby;
as U.S. citizens to vote - in- noted for their apathy and traditionally Human SERVE (ServiceI
e homebound, the physically low turnouts. Registration, Voting and
ed and the elderly." "PIRGIM'S goal is to get students in- Campaign) Michigan Prot
a registrar is a position of volved in the plolitical process - that's Advocacy Service for Devel
ility, we can't just allow why we're emphasizing voter Disabled Citizens, Inc.; and t
o become one ... in the past, registration, particularly for this fall," of Flint.

ssues, such
ect studen-
of-state."
the trend
ginning to
red about
improve n
incoming
portance,"
come very
he greater
success."
he plaintiff
rent voter
the Arab-
on Projec-
Community
troit-Voter
gan Center
ment, Inc.;
Michigan
Employees
Education
ection and
bpmentally
the NAACP

Gunman's motive remains unknown
From AP and UPI
SAN YSIDRO, Calif. - A man who told his wife "I'll see you wife a short time before the massacre.
later," and then walked into a McDonald's restaurant and Police, who said the recently unemployed security guard
shot to death 22 people and wounded 11 more in just 10 ordered his victims to the restaurant floor and then
minutes, may have been despondent over being fired as a systematically shot them, said there had been no argument.
security guard last week, police said yesterday. Officers said Huberty calmly walked out of his apartment
But officials said they still had no motive for the after taking his wife and two daughters on a family outing to
Wednesday afternoon killings by James Huberty, 41, who the San Diego Zoo, and headed for McDonald's.
was slain by a police sharpshooter more than an hour after he Huberty entered the restaurant with three weapons and his
opened up with a pistol, shotgun and rifle. It was believed to pockets stuffed with more ammunition and began firing. He
be the largest one-day mass murder by a gunman in U.S. pumped bullets into terrified patrons lying on the floor and
history. cowering under tables.
Neighbors said the killer, who was dropped by a police "The moment he walked in he said, 'Everybody get down
sniper and died instantly after firing hundreds of rounds in to
the crowded fast-food restaurant, had an argument with his See McDONALD'S, Page5

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