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June 05, 1984 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1984-06-05

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

STUDENT FIGHTS FOR SIX YEARS
'U' stays strict on residency rule

By DAVID VANKER
Robert Casad has tried just about everything.
In his bid to be considered a resident of Michigan
in order to pay the lower tuition required of residents,
the 24-year-old gereontology research assistant has
applied and reapplied to Assistant Registrar Larry
Katz, appealed Katz's denials to Richard Kennedy,
the University's Vice President for State Relations,
represented himself in federal court in a suit against
the University's regents, and spoken twice to the
regents at their monthly meetings.
CASAD CONTENDS that he meets "most of the
requirements" for resident status, but officials say

his intention to accept a post-doctoral scholarship
outside the country disqualifies him.
Katz and Kennedy refused to discuss the details of
Casad's case, but they said student attempts to
circumvent the residency regulations are both
obvious and rare. "The aplication won't hold together
if there's some abuse of the regulations in it," Katz
said. "We can check the facts with various University
offices."
"Fortunately," he added, "it's been infrequent
enough that we haven't had to consider what kind of
discipline would be appropriate."
MOST RESIDENT students don't give their status
a second thought, but to those who come to the

University from outside the state, non-residency
means significantly higher tuition.
For 1983-84, tuition for undergraduate juniors and
seniors is $1212 per term, while non-residents of the
same standing pay $3384, nearly three times as much.
Non-resident graduate students pay $3428, over twice
the $1598 paid by residents.
Casad's most recent action in his own case was to
request that the regents send his file and a copy of the
regulations to the University ombudsman for a final,
impartial ruling.
KENNEDY SAID he will not respond to Casad's
latest letter, but that the regents will announce their
See 'U', Page 11

Nit-forear i afel
Ninety-four years of editorial freedom

Vol. XCIV, No. 13-S

Copyright 1984

Ann Arbor, Michigan-

Tuesday, June 5, 1984

Fifteen Cents

Sixteen Pages

Burke arrested
on disorderly

conduct
By ERIC MATTSON
One of Ann Arbor's favorite Diag en-
tertainers was caught in the act and
arrested yesterday for disorderly con-
duct.
Stoney Burke, a popular Diag
comedian/philosopher, was arrested
yesterday afternoon after a police of-
ficer rode past on his bike three times
and warned Burke to stop using ob-
scenities. Burke allegedly refused each
request.
ACCORDING to eyewitnesses, Burke
had been performing his usual act and
had been lamenting the Reagan ad-
ministration. "What he was doing today
- if it was different at all he was milder
than usual," said Dave Casper, a
CAROL 1. FRANCAVILLA/Dailv graduate student.
Diag comedian/philosopher Stoney Burke stands outside City Hall But Sgt. Paul Bunten of the Ann Ar-
yesterday after his arraignment in 15th District Court. Burke was arrested bor Police said "I don't know that he's
on a charge of disorderly conduct.
Couneil vote leaves Braun Insi
"The
Court open to development Omaha t
Series ga

charge
Bunten said Burke was arrested par-
tly because he was using obscenities,
and added that he didn't think Burke's
right to freedom of speech had been
violated.
"WE DIDN'T arrest Stoney Burke
just because he's Stoney Burke," he
said. "I think the only issue is that you
can't call people those kind of names,"
he said, referring to the allegation that
Burke shouted obscenities at passers-
by and police.
Burke made a brief appearance at an
arraignment and stood mute to the
charge, which the court enters as a plea
of not guilty.
When the judge, Burke's lawyer, and
the bailiff briefly left the courtroom,
Burke leaped up and shouted "OK,
that's it. We're taking over."
Later, when Judge Pieter Thomassen
asked Burke to approach the podium
See BURKE, Page 11
de:
Wolverines ended a short stay in
by losing their second College World
ame to New Orleans. See Sports, Page
art school hopes to attract students
A and other programs. See Page 3.
rmation about hospitals and doctors
e made public, but stitches and taped
not glamorous. See Opinion, Page 6.
l performers take a flight over the
nest.See Arts, Page8.
ide:
th a high in the 80s and a chance of

By ERIC MATTSON
The fight over the fate of a seven-house develop-
ment downtown ended last night as the Ann Arbor
City Council voted down a plan to rezone the area to
strictly residential use.
Braun Court will remain zoned for residential, of-
fice, or commercial use. Despite the efforts of the
Downtown Neighbors Association, the 74-year-old
development will be converted to retail use by
developer Peter Allen and landlord Jan Mak.
MEMBERS OF THE DNA presented the Council
with a 350-signature petition opposing the conversion
of the development, but the ordinance was defeated
five to five (along party lines), with six votes needed
for approval.
Before the Council voted on the proposal, sponsored

by Councilmember Lowell Peterson (D-First Ward),
four people used audience participation time to ex-
press their support for the proposal.
Fred Horowitz, a former Braun Court 'resident,
reminisced about the years he spent there.
"IT'S A DAMN homely place, but it's something
special," said Horowitz, now a professor at
Washtenaw Community College. "It wasn't terribly
beautiful, but there was something about it."
Ethel Potts, a member of Citizens Association for
Area Planning, also opposed the expansion of com-
mercialism downtown.
"We do not see a need to add to the downtown
acerage house by house when there is so much
See BRAUN, Page 2

16.
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from LS
" Info
should b
toes arei
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cuckoo's
Outs
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rain.

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