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May 25, 1984 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1984-05-25

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The Michigan Daily - Friday, May 25, 1984 -Page 7
Administration seeks
record debt increase

(Continued from Page 2)
quickly accepted by voice vote the
slightly different $30 billion boost
adopted by the Senate.
House and Senate negotiators needed
to resolve the difference before mid-
night so the bill could be sent to
President Reagan for his signature.
Without action, government benefit
checks - Social Security for example
- could bounce, Treasury Secretary
Donald Reagan warned.

A $30 billion increase, permanent or
temporary, is small by the standards of
federal red ink and would'set the ceiling
at $1.52 trillion.
The reasoning given in the House for
a short-term increase was to give added
incentive to Congress to reconcile dif-
fering House and Senate measures to
reduce budget deficits over the next
three years.

Wednesday's solar eclipse
may be dangerous to eyes

Treasures revealed Associated Press
Dr. Steven Muller, President of Johns Hopkins University examines a bottle
of book-binding glue which was found in a sealed vault on the university
campus which had been sealed for over 3 decades prior to the opening
yesterday morning. Other treasures found were floor plans to Gilman Hall,
78 rpm sound effects records, and some confederate naval papers.
Citizens protest Braun Ct.
conversion to retail use
(Continued from Fage 3) continue to rent the houses for residen-
little initiative and clean the place up." tial use. "I won't subsidize it, but I'm
Braun Court resident Tom Marx willing to discuss it," he said.
strode up to the podium when Nelson The next confrontation in the con-
concluded and said, "I've just been troversy will come on June 4, when
insulted . . . I don't think I live in a Councilmember Lowell Peterson (D-
slum area." First Ward) will introduce a proposal to
Developer Peter Allen apologized for the City Council to rezone the neigh-
the fact that the residents learned they borhood for strictly residential use. It is
would be forced out of their homes currently zoned for office, retail, or
through the newspaper and said he may residential use.
4 uri t *iervires

(Conti"ed"fromPage1)
curring at 12:37, said Loudon.
THE BEST way to safely view the
astronomical event is through the
telescope on the fifth floor of Angell Hall
said Loudon. The University's
astronomy department and the Univer-
sity Lowbrow Astronomers, a local
amateur astronomy group, will offer
free observations to the public with the
specially equipped telescope.
The National Society to Prevent Blin-
dness recommends another safe
method of viewing the eclipse using two
sheets of white cardboard. Make a
pinhold in the center of one sheet and,
standing with your back to the sun, hold

the sheet with the pinhold over the solid
sheet. On the solid bottom sheet, the
exact image of the eclipse will be
reflected.
Using sunglasses, smoked glass or
even welder's glasses to protect eyes
will "just increase the danger of blin-
dness," Loudon said.
The last annular eclipse visible in
North America was in 1951 and the next
will be in 1994 when the view from in
Ann Arbor will be evenvmore spec-
tacular. The shadow of the overlap of
the sun and the moon will be cast on the
city, reflecting the jagged lunar craters
silhouetted onto the ground.

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH AND
AMERICAN BAPTIST CAMPUS
FOUNDATION
502 East Huron., 663-9376
(Between State and Division)
Sunday Worship 9:55 a.m.
May 27 Sermon: "Peace Makers."
Childcare provided.
John Reed, Director; Janice Beck, or-
ganist.
Pastor and Campus Minister, Robert
B. Wallace.
Associate Minister, Terry Ging.
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
1432 Washtenaw Ave., 662-4466
(Between S. University and Hill)
Sunday Worship Services 9:30 and
11:00.
Wednesday Night Fellowship, 8:00.
Communion at 9:30
Campus Minister - Steve Spina
CAMPUS CHAPEL
1236 Washtenaw Ct.
A Campus Ministry of the
Christian Reformed Church
Pastor: Reverend Don Postema
668-7421
Sunday Morning 10:00 a.m. Service:
Guest Speaker, Ms. Laura Smit, Stu-
dent at the Calvin Theological Semi-
nary. There will be a Peace Sabbath to
celebrate Peace and Justice Week.
6:00 p.m. Evening Worship.

UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN
CHAPEL
1511 Washtenaw
Robert Kavasch, Pastor
663-5566
Sunday 9:30 Worship Service.
LUTHERN CAMPUS MINISTRY
at Lord of Light
(LCA-ALC-AELC)
801S.Forest at Hill St.
668-7622
Pastor: Galen Hora
Sunday Worship: 10:30 a.m.
FIRST UNITED
METHODIST CHURCH
120 S. State St.
(Cornr of State and Huron)
662-4536
Sunday 9:30 and,11:00. "The Long and
Short of it" by Dr. Gerald R. Parker.
A Memorial Garden Service will follow
the 11:00 WorshipService.
Ministers:
Dr. Donald B. Strobe
Dr. Gerald R. Parker
Rev. Tom Wachterhauser
Education Director:
Rose McLean
Broadcast Sundays 9:30 a.m.- WNRS, 1290 AM
Televised Mondays 8:00 p.m.-Cable Chanel 9.

---------------am m m - m - = - - m - m mm m mi
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