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May 18, 1984 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1984-05-18

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Ninety-four years of editorialfreedom
Ann Arbor, Michigan - Friday, May 18, 1984

Vol. XCIV, No. 7-S

Copyright 1984

Fifteen Cents

Sixteen Pages

DOUG McMAHON/Daily
The dignitaries taking part in the ground breaking ceremony for the new engineering building yesterday included, from
left to right, Regent Sarah Power, Regent Gerald Dunn, University President Harold Shapiro, Gov. James Blanchard,
Regent Thomas Roach, Regent Deane Baker, and Engineering Dean James Duderstadt.
Bktnchard bek gon
~~rasor new campus bidn
buC & n

Delay puts
Leo Kelly
arguments
in jeopardy
By LOU FINTOR
A Washtenaw County assistant
prosecutor may be barred from presen-
ting oral arguments in the appeals trial
of Leo Kelly - the University student
convicted of killing two Bursley Hall
residents in 1981 - because office
problems prevented her from meeting
a court deadline for filing a legal brief, a
county prosecutor told the Daily
yesterday.
Assistant Prosecuting Attorney
Marilyn Eisenbraun failed to meet the
Michigan Court of Appeals' March 17
deadline because a student legal intern
who "did a substantial amount of
work" on the brief left the office forcing
Eisenbraun to "literally start from
scratch," said Lynwood Noah, a
Washtenaw County Prosecuting Attor-
ney who tried the Kelly case in 1982.
KELLY, A 25-year-old black
Detroiter, was convicted of shooting
fellow Bursley residents Edward Siwik,
19, of Detroit, and Resident Advisor
Douglas McGreaham, 21, of Caspian,
after fire bombing the dormitory on
Good Friday, 1981.
An all-white jury dismissed Kelly's
insanity plea and announced the guilty
verdict on June 21, 1982 following a
four-week trial that drew national at-
tention. On August 14, 1982, Washtenaw
County Circuit Court Judge Ross Cam-
pbell sentenced Kelly "to be placed in
solitary confinement, with hard labor,
for the rest of your natural life," (and
he is currently serving time) at the
Marquette State Penitentiary, while
awaiting appeal.
A spokesperson for the state appeals
court in Lansing said that although
Kelly's counsel, prominent Detroit at-
torney Chokwe Lumumba, has been
granted a request to present oral
arguments to justices, Eisenbraun may
have to rely on the brief which she plans
to file early next week.
"I CAN'T SAY whether the
prosecutor's office will be endorsed for
See PROSECUTOR'S, Page 11

By ANDREW ERIKSEN
Gov. James Blanchard, along with University President
Harold Shapiro and Engineering Dean James Duderstadt,
presided over the ground breaking for the new engineering
building on North Campus yesterday.
"This (project) represents a renewed commitment,"
Blanchard said to about 150 people at the ground breaking
ceremony. "This building is the first state-funded project in
two decades...we've got the ball rolling again."
Duderstadt said the new building is "the cornerstone to
making the College of Engineering one of the leading schools
it the nation and in the process it will strengthen the state's
industrial base."
The University regents, taking time out from their monthly
meeting, also attended the groundbreaking ceremony.
There is an obvious link between research facilities and
high-tech jobs, Blanchard said. He said that two high-tech
firms have decided to move to Michigan and one of them has
decided to settle in Ann Arbor.
The College of Engineering could become Michigan's

Silicon Valley, Duderstadt said.
"Our greatest natural resource is not our lakes or our state
forests," said Duderstadt, "but our people, especially our
young people."
The entering freshman has a collective high school grade
point average of 3.7 or higher, said Duderstadt. These
students certainly represent the state's most valuable
resource or its future, he said.
"I'm glad I didn't apply to the engineering school," said
Shapiro after Duderstadt's remarks.
The state has to start planning for its long-term future, said
Duderstadt. Brain power, not semi-skilled labor, could be the
focus for the state's future, he said.
While the ground was being broken for the new engineering
building, four members of the Progressive Student Network
stood outside the fence surrounding the construction area
holding a banner. Tom Marx, a member of PSN, handed out
pamphlets to several people attending the ceremony. The
pamphlet stated that PSN was not protesting the ground
See BLANCHARD, Page 11

Inside:
" University regents receive negative feed-
back ona proposed Department of Defense sof-
twsre institute. See psge 3. -
" An Ann Arbor congregation could have had
a more Christisn attitude toward homeless
people. See Opinion, psge 6.
" Laurie Anderson supplements musical
talent with multi-media effects. See Arts, page
8.
Outside:
" Sunny and warm with a high temperature
near 80 degrees.

No surprise: Berenson will
return to eoaehM'eers
By MIKE McGRAW falo Sabres' assistant would be returning to his alma
If the athletic department was trying to keep the mater.
identity of Michigan 's new hockey coach a secret, it JUST IN CASE someone missed all ofsthis, yester-
didnt doavey god jo. ' day morning the message board at Yost Arena read
Athletic Director Don Canham didn't hide the fact "Welcome Home Red Berenson."
that the man he was after was former Wolverine All- And sure enough, at the 'M' Club Room at the golf
American Red Berenson. And when it was announced course yesterday, the 1981 NHL Coach-of-the-Year
three days ago that a press conference would be held stepped in front of the cameras and reporters to an-
Thursday to announce the new coach, several nounce that he would be returning to Ann Arbor to try
publications went ahead and reported that the Buf- to revives hockey program that has been declining in

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