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July 21, 1983 - Image 7

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1983-07-21

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The Michigan Daily - Thursday, July 21, 1983 - Page 7
Harvard student's scheme fails

Preliminary hearings were held last
week for a Cambridge man charged
with raping a former Harvard Univer-
COLLEGES'
sity student and forcing her to black-
mail a top Harvard law professor.
The woman, whose name and age
have not been released, testified that in
February her boyfriend, A. Victor
Gaentas, allegedly raped her and then
forced her to tell Cambridge police of-

ficials that Harvard Law Prof. Detler
Vasts rapedher.
The woman worked for Vagts helping
to take care of his ailing father but was:
fired in January after several thefts
were reported. The woman dropped out:
of school in December.
When the woman reported the
charges to the police in February, of-
ficials investigated the incident. The'
police discovered the attempted
blackmail scheme and arrested Gaen-
tas.
Gaentas allegedly told the woman
that Vagts would pay off the couple
before the case ever reached the courts
to protect his reputation. The woman

testified that Gaentas encouraged her
to publicize the case to The Boston
Globe and The Harvard Crimson.
Neither papers printed the story that
Vagts raped the woman. A grand jury
this fall will hear the extortion and rape
charges against Gaentas sometime this
fall.
- The Harvard Crimson
MSU gets dead ape
The body of a deceased gorilla named
Jim-Jim, formerly a star attraction at
the Detroit Zoo, was donated this month
to the natural history museum at

Michigan State University.
After undergoing a bone-cleaning
process of enclosing the dead gorilla in
a room filled with dermestid beetles,
Jim-Jim's skeleton will be used in MSU
zoology classes in September.
Natural history museums commonly
use dermestid beetles to eat the flesh
off animal bones, said Kurt Duehurst,
official at MSU's museum. The
cleaning process usually lasts several
weeks, Duehurst said.
- The State News
Colleges appears every Thursday.
Compiled by Halle Czechowski.

Annual art fair crowds pack city streets

(Continued from Page 1)
Annville, Pennsylvania. "I do a lot (of
fairs) that I think are a lot better," he
said.
REASONS for coming to the fair are
as varied as the artwork itself. "Most of
the local people come for the deals on
clothes. Most of the younger people
come to check out the action," said Ken
Miline of Ann Arbor.
Grosse Pointe art teacher Lina Lund
said she comes each year to stay at-
tuned to the innovations and changes in
the art.
For Milwaukee. illustrator Dan
Nedobech, "This is the only place I
spend money," on art.
But art takes on a broad definition at
the fair, with as many vendors and
magicians as painters.
The Flying Gambini Brothers, a
comic juggling act, are in their second
season at the fair, and they hope to earn
$200 a day this time around. The money
goes into a silver trash can.
"Street entertaining is the hardest
entertainment there is. You have to get
them to stay, you have to make them
stay, and getting money out of them is
even harder," said Bobby Hills, one of
the Gambinis.
"THIS IS a great atmosphere," Hills

said. "Being around all that creative
stuff rubs off on us."
The jammed Ann Arbor streets are a
noisy, pushing contrast to the quiet mon-
ths of May and June. "This (fair) has a
tendency to be a little crowded," said
Indiana photographer John Fulton. But
Fulton said it's worth the long trip
because of the wide exposure the fair
offers.
"People take their vacations just to
come to the art fair," Fulton said. "We
get buyers from all different parts of the'
country."
MANY ARTISTS said that even if
sales did not go as well as they had
hoped, they still expected the fair to add
to their resume, which can be "a step-
ping stone to other shows," one artist
said.
Artists also come for the chance to be
scouted by gallery owners as far away
as New York.
Restaurants and stores such as
Olga's, Raja Rani, Marshall's, and
Miller's Farms Ice Cream Parlor all
set up booths to cash in on the hot
weather and large crowds.
RICK'S AMERICAN Cafe and Joe's
Star Lounge have free concerts
scheduled throughout the fair. The
combination of drink and music is

likely to set people dancing in the
streets as the fair continues.
Mark Fox, sipping a rum and coke in
front of the Second Chance said, "it's
great, all the free music."
The first day of the fair was a good
one as far as injuries went. The Ann
Arbor Fire Department responded to a
call from a woman who passed out from
sunstroke, but no other serious inciden-
ts were reported.
MOST OF the Ann Arbor Police of-
ficers assigned to the fair Spent their
time making sure vendors were
properly licensed.
The Red Cross set up a first-aid
station on the corner of East and South
University Streets, but Susan Brown,
Who ran the station, said they only saw
a few cases of blisters.
To avoid dehydration, Brown
suggested tourists should drink plenty
of liquids and rest whenever they're
tired.
The art fair sprawls through much of

the downtown and University area, but
it is actually not one, but three fairs.
The oldest of the three is the Ann Arbor
Street Fair, located on South and East
University streets. The State Street
Area Art Fair is the smallest, located
on State, North University, Liberty and
Maynard streets.
The Summer Arts Festival, largest of
the three, is located on Main Street.
Read
and
Use
Daily
Class if ieds

BIKINI CONTEST
SATURDAY, JULY 30, 1983
WANTED
YOUR BODY at
THE LITTLE ROOSTER
11485 N. Territorial Ph. 426-8668

You're Needed
All Over the
World.
Ask Peace Corps volunteers why their ingenuity and flexibility
are as viral as their degrees. They'll tell you they are helping
the world's poorest peoples ottoin self sufficiency in the areas
of food production, energy conservation, education, economic
development and health services. And they'll tell you about
the rewards of hands on career experience overseas. They'll
tell you it's the toughest job you'll ever love.
See Representatives
during the Ann Arbor
Art Fair.
764-9310
or
1-226-7928, Detroit
PEACE CORPS

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ASK FOR JOE
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BIKINI CONTEST
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JOIN THE FUN!!!
1st Prize-$75.00 NO ENTRY FEE
2nd P.Ize-$50.O0 MUST BE
3rd Prize-$5.00
4th Prize-STEAKS FOR TWO 18 and up
ENTRY FORMSAVAILABLEsAT
LITTLE ROOSrE ORIN YOUJRLOCAL NEWSPAPER

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