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July 07, 1983 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1983-07-07

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

The Michigan Daily - Thursday, July 7, 1983 - Page 7
Gators write video virgin guide

Two Florida students have teamed up
to write the complete guide for video
virgins, Defending the Galaxy.
The manual written in the same
genre as The Preppie Handbook. Author
Michael Rubin, a Gainsville native who
attends Brown University, said it is
written for the person who is curious
COLLEGES
about video games, but afraid to walk
into an arcade and start dropping quar-
ters.
Rubin spent last summer putting the
book together with Carl Winefordner, a
University of Florida engineering
student.
The authors said Gainsville was an
ideal spot to write the book because of
the high quality and quantity of playing
in the area.
Nearly 7,500 copies of the book have
been sold nationwide, but local sales
have been dismal so far.
"It's really strange," said Rubin.
52
s ,
CottaaHe IN
10 PM to 1 AM
Sunday thru Thursday /
HAPPY HOURS
DRINKS 2 fort
PITCHER DLsDw U 2.A
GLASSES MIc"O" UGHT .S
DOMESTIC WINES .7S
j j :00 - Midnight
STue. - Sun.

"Gainsville doesn't seem to care about
anything that comes from here."
The Independent Florida Alligator
Indiana student elected to
parliament
A graduate student at Indiana
University became the youngest mem-
ber of Britain's House of Commons in
last month's elections.
Charles Kennedy, a 23-year-old
Fulbright scholar from Scotland, com-
pleted his course work in May before
returning to Scotland to campaign.
In an election dominated by Prime
Minister Margaret Thatcher's Conser-
vative Party, Kennedyscored a
political upset by winning on the Social
Democratic Party ticket against for-
mer Minister of State for Energy
Hamish Gray.
Kennedy expects to complete his
thesis soon on Roy Jenkins, the former
leader of the Social Democratic Party.
The Indiana Daily Student
Illinois admits 15-year-old
A 15-year-old whiz kid has been ac-
cepted as a junior in the College of
Engineering at the University of
Illinois.
Branko Radosavljevic started taking
college courses in the eighth grade
from Purdue University at which his
father is a professor of computer
programming.
He graduated last month from
Morgan Park High School in Chicago
after spending only one year there.
Radosavljevic will study in the
College of Electrical Engineering, star-
ting a year ahead of his 20-year-old
brother Alex.
The Daily Illini
Tufts prof probed
A former biologist at Tufts University
in Boston is being investigated for
possible misuse of funds, an alleged
homicide, and theft of university office
equipment.
Tufts spokesman Hank Wilson said
$65,000 in research funds "may have

been misused by (William) Douglas," a
researcher in cellular biology.
Douglas resigned his job as associate
professor of anatomy in the medical
school May 27.
Douglas has also been identified as a
murder suspect in the disappearance of
Robin Benedict, a 21-year-old graphic
artist, although no charges have been
filed yet in the case.
Benedict's car was last seen in front
of Douglas's home and her purse was
found in one of his closets. Police sear-
ching his home also found computer
and office equipment Douglas allegedly
stole from his office in January.
The Chronicle of Higher Education
Court rejects Calif. abortion
suit
The Supreme Court last month
refused to hear a suit by University of
California students who objected to
paying mandatory health service fees
becuase some of the money went to
pregnancy counseling and abortions.
The suit was first filed in 1977 by
three students at the University of
California in San Diego who argued un-
successfully in state courts that their
First Amendment rights to freedom of
religion were violated by having to pay
for other students' abortions.
Students who refuse to pay the fee
can be expelled or denied admission to
the university.
The Daily Bruin
California prohibits gay
discrimination
Homosexual students and em-
ployees in the University of California
are now protected by the university's
anti-discrimination policies following a
decision in June by the board of regen-
ts.
The vote came after a survey by the
Lesbian and Gay Intercampus Network
showing that campus homosexuals suf-
fer physical and emotional harassment.
The new policy prohibits
discrimination on the basis of sexual
orientation in university hiring,

promotions, admissions, and other
university activities.
The Chronicle of Higher Education
Western makes Chinese con-
nection
East is east and west is west and the
twain shall meet following an
agreement signed last month between
Western Michigan University and
Guangxi University in China.
The agreement calls for an exchange
of scholars, students, books, and
materials. In May, Guangxi University,
one of China's top arts and sciences in-
stitutions, opened the door by inviting
six faculty members from Western to
visit the region.
During the next three years Guangxi
University will send as many as 20
visiting scholars to Western for
graduate work and the school has of-
fered to host faculty and students from
Western as visiting scholars in return.
The Western Herald
New Mexico profs cut their
pay
In a sacrificial move to counter
budget cuts in the music department at
the University of New Mexico, faculty
members voted unanimously last mon-
th to cut their own salaries to save the
summer class schedule.
After budget cuts were announced in
early June, the department decided to
cut classes which were normally of-
fered to public school teachers working
towards Master's degrees.
Eleven faculty members took cuts
ranging from $300 to $1,200 and
managed to save seven of the nine
classes offered in the summer term.
The art and theatre arts departments
cancelled all their summer classes to
keep their fall and spring term classes
intact.
'Daily Lobo
- Compiled by Halle Czechowski
Colleges is a regular feature ap-
pearing every Thursday.
UNIVERSITY TEST
PREPARATION SERVICE
Seminars now forming for
Oct. and Dec. 1983
LSAT and GMAT
For further information
please call
(313) 425-TEST

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