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May 21, 1983 - Image 7

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1983-05-21

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The Michigan Daily - Saturday, May 21, 1983 - Page 7
Bartleby's cashes in on students

By JACKIE YOUNG
Bartleby's made students an offer last term that
nearly 2,000 couldn't refuse. The temptation to skip
class was a guilt-free reality for some students who
paid Bartleby's to take notes for them.
Patterned after the "Black Lightening" chain of
note taking services on the west coast, Perry March
opened Bartleby's at the University Cellar last
January.
FOR UNDER $17 a term, students could pick up
notes from 25 University courses 48 hours after the
lecture, March said.
The 25 note takers, all graduate students, made
$610 each for their work last term, March said. Bar-
tleby's made a significant, profit - "enough to pay
off debts," according to March - although he would
not give an exact amount.
Out of operation during the summer, Bartleby's
will return in September with 15 additional courses,
March said. A Bartleby's is opening at Ohio State
University in September, and March is also planning
to start a branch at Western Michigan University.

THE BLACK LIGHTENING chain has also expan-
ded from Stanford, and the University of California in
Los Angeles and Berkeley to include the University of
Wisconsin.
Many University professors criticized Bartleby's
when it began last January because they said the
notes could be inaccurate, encourage skipping class,
and discriminate against students who couldn't af-
ford them.
"Quality of notes is a very important factor.
Without the proper notetaker the notes could be of lit-
tle value to students," said Political Science Prof. J.
David Singer.
PROFESSORS WERE given the option to look over
the notes before they were sold to students, and Bar-
tleby's would pay them 50 cents to contribute to their
department.
Bartleby's strives for accuracy, March said, ad-
ding that last term 21 of the 25 notetakers were ap-
pointed by the professors teaching the course. Most of
the graduate students were teaching assistants in the
class.

Many students who subscribed said it was too ex-
pensive. The average cost was $13 a term, which
March said would drop to $10 by September.
THE SERVICE also gave those students who could af-
ford it an unfair advantage, said Charles Brace, an
anthropology professor.
The notes are valuable, Brace said, if students use
them as a supplement to their own notes which March
insists is the purpose of the service.
"Notes are a good supplement to classes and
provide a good second opinion on material presented
in class - but students still need classes," March
said.
Notes won't be provided for courses which require
creative interpretation such as art history, he said.
When Bartleby's returns in the fall, classes will be
better suited to the notetaking system, March said.
Bartleby's has more credibility with professors and
will institute an editing policy which would require
that another person look over each set of notes to en-
sure accuracy.

Ann Arbor copystores fear publishers' lawsuits

(Continued from Page 1)
case, said Robert Dautremont, Univer-
sity attorney.
"We will watch the New York case
carefully, but will not jump to any con-
clusions now, because not all the details
are out yet," said Dautremont. "The
copyright law is a complex problem
and the limits are not yet completely
decided."
COURSEPACKS copied in University
Printing Centers strictly comply with
the law, said John Ketelhut, University
attorney.
Professors must submit written per-
mission from the publisher before
University Printing Centers will use the
copyrighted material, according to
Ralph Maten, head of the copy center.
"We follow the law strictly because
me, the professor, and the Univesity
will all be libel in case of a lawsuit,"
Maten said.
MEANWHILE CAMPUS copystores
are requiring professors to sign
disclaimers that certify materials will
only be used for educational purposes,
said Bill Wood, owner of Albert's
Copying on East Liberty Street. In ad-
dition the disclaimer ensures that
copying doesn't violate publisher's
rights to profits from selling the
material.
Copy stores must often pay royalties
to publishers for reprinting copyrighted
works. At Albert's, students
unknowingly pay royalty charges
which are included in coursepack
prices, Wood said. Royalty charges
range from less than half a cent to $1
per page, he added.
But copyright laws prohibit students
from being charged beyond the costs of
copying, according to guidelines issued
from the Copyright Office in
Washington D.C.
IT IS difficult, however, to determine
when the law is being violated, Wood
said because there are too many "gray
areas."
Every day,i Kinko's Copies turns
away three to four customers who want
illegal copying done, said Shop
manager George Kann.
The threat of a lawsuit does not worry
Kann because Kindo's will only copy
materials that comply with the law, he
said. Kinko's requires written per-
mission from publishers and also asks
professors to sign a disclaimer, per-
manently filing all these documents, he
added.

OTHER COPY STORES are not as
strict. Phil Zaret, owner of Accu-Copy-
on Maynard Street said he trusts that
his customers are honest and comply
with copyright laws. "I can't afford to
police the professor's - and my other
customer's - copying," Zaret said.
Dollar Bill Copying owner Bill Slack
would not comment on his store's
policies, but said that the law is vague
and rules for making coursepacks are
"up in the air."
The New York lawsuit is being con-
tested by local and national copy store
chains, but meanwhile the threat of
more lawsuits has prompted some

universities to issue guidelines to
professors on enforcing copyright laws.
MANY UNIVERSITY professors who
rely heavily on coursepacks know
"very little" about copyright
regulations, according to Com-
munication Professor Marion Marzolf.
"Ninety-nine percent of the
faculty aren't aware of the laws and
don't care," said Charles Morris,
associate chairman of the Psychology
Department, adding that he hopes the
University will publish guidelines
clarifying the professors' responsibility
to publishers when making cour-
sepacks.

At most state universities copy stores
follow procedures similar to those used
in Ann Arbor.
Since the New York suit, Wayne State
University issued guidelines to
professors on enforcing the law.
At Michigan State University, the
administration has not yet issued any
rules for complying with copyright
laws, said Robert Bankes, in
MSU's Provost office.

Aak L.461.996. ur rb ur l 4r PruitE
(94

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH AND
AMERICAN BAPTIST CAMPUS
FOUNDATION
502 East Huron, 663-9376
10:00 a.m. Sunday Worship. Child care
is provided.
11:00 a.m.-Church School. Classes
for all ages. Class for undergraduates.
Class for graduates and faculty.
Also:
Choir Thursday 7:15 p.m., John Reed,
director; Janice Beck, organist.
Ministry Assistants: Marlene Francis,
Terry Ging, Barbara Griffen, Jerry
Rees.
FIRST UNITED
METHODIST CHURCH
120 S. Slate St.
(Corner of State and Huron)
Worship Schedule:
THE SHY MEMBER OF THE
TRINITY by Dr. Donald B. Strobe.
Church School for all ages-9:30 a.m.
and 11:00 a.m.
Choir Rehearsal-Thursday at 7:15
p.m.
Ministers:
Dr. Donald B. Strobe
Rev. Fred B. Maitland
Dr. Gerald R. Parker
Education Directors:
Rose McLean and Carol Bennington.

LORD OF LIGHT LUTHERAN
(The Campus Ministry
of the LCA-ALC-AELC)
Galen Hora, Pastor
801 S. Forest at Hill St. 668-7622
Worship Sunday at 10:30 a.m.
CAMPUS CHAPEL
1236 Washtenaw Ct.
A Campus Ministry of the
Christian Reformed Church
Reverend Don Postema
10:00 a.m. Service of Holy Com-
munion.
6:00 p.m. Evening Worship.
Wednesday, 10:00 p.m. Evening.
Prayers.
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
1432 Washtenaw Ave., 6624466
(between S. University and Hill)
Campus/Career Fellowship Coor-
dinator: Steve Spina.
Sunday 9:30 and 11:00 a.m.
Coffee House-10:30 social hall.
Wednesday p.m.
8:00-Allelous (Christian
Fellowship), French Room.
8:30-Study/Discussion Groups
9:30-Holy Communion, sanctuary.

NEW GRACE APOSTOLIC CHURCH
632 N. Fourth Ave.
Rev. Avery Dumas Jr., Pastor
9:45 a.m. Sunday School.
11:45Morning Worship.
7:00 p.m. Evening service.
Bible Study-Wed. & Fri. 7p.m.
For rides call 761-1530.
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
1511 Washtenaw between Hill and South
University
Sunday Service 9:30 a.m.
Sunday morning Bible Study
following service.
Wednesdays: Volleyball at 7 p.m. and
Bible Study at 9 p.m.
THE DAILY
CLASSIFIEDS
ARE A GREAT
WAY TO GET
FAST RESULTS
CALL 764-0557

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